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Rocks, Rock Cycle, Types of Rocks, Quiz, and more, Earth Science Lesson PowerPoint

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Geology Topics unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 6000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 14 page bundled homework package, ...

This PowerPoint is one small part of the Geology Topics unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 6000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 14 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 12 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, 6 PowerPoint review Game, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus within The Geology Topics Unit: -Plate Tectonics, Evidence for Plate Tectonics, Pangea, Energy Waves, Layers of the Earth, Heat Transfer, Types of Crust, Plate Boundaries, Hot Spots, Volcanoes, Positives and Negatives of Volcanoes, Types of Volcanoes, Parts of a Volcano, Magma, Types of Lava, Viscosity, Earthquakes, Faults, Folds, Seismograph, Richter Scale, Seismograph, Tsunami's, Rocks, Minerals, Crystals, Uses of Minerals, Types of Crystals, Physical Properties of Minerals, Rock Cycle, Common Igneous Rocks, Common Sedimentary Rocks, Common Metamorphic Rocks.
This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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Rocks, Rock Cycle, Types of Rocks, Quiz, and more, Earth Science Lesson PowerPoint Rocks, Rock Cycle, Types of Rocks, Quiz, and more, Earth Science Lesson PowerPoint Presentation Transcript

  • • Limestone becomes marble Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn.
  • • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:
  •  New Area of Focus. The Rock Cycle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  The rock cycle: How one rock changes into another.  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  The rock cycle: How one rock changes into another.  Driven by plate tectonics. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Review: Rock: A mixture of Minerals
  • • Activity! Recording notes of the Rock Cycle / Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Activity! Recording notes of the Rock Cycle / Musical Dance Number. – Whole page needed in journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • The class will be divided into 3 groups. – The teacher will assign each group a rock to create a singing name for. Ex -“Igggggneeous” – They must sing (dance?) the name of that rock when signaled in slideshow. (10 sec) – Igneous. Sedimentary. Metamorphic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • New Material Added From Mantle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Rock Cycle. Learn more at… http://www.learner.org/interactives/rockcycle/diagram.html
  • The Big Ideas with the rock cycle are…
  • The rock cycle has been cycling and changing rocks form for millions of years.
  • • Activity! Making the Rock Cycle
  • • Activity! Making the Rock Cycle – Table groups need to complete the following. • Step 1: Igneous rock (Birth of the rock)
  • • Activity! Making the Rock Cycle – Table groups need to complete the following. • Step 1: Igneous rock (Birth of the rock) – Volcano erupts chunks of crayons (unwrapped) that pile on top of the earth (Large piece of aluminum foil).
  • • Activity! Making the Rock Cycle – Wear Safety Goggles.
  • • Activity! Making the Rock Cycle – Wear Safety Goggles. • Step 2: Weathering and Erosion
  • • Activity! Making the Rock Cycle – Wear Safety Goggles. • Step 2: Weathering and Erosion – Break chunks of crayon into tiny pieces as well as use plastic knife to create shavings.
  • • Activity! Making the Rock Cycle – Wear Safety Goggles. • Step 2: Weathering and Erosion – Break chunks of crayon into tiny pieces as well as use plastic knife to create shavings. – Wind, Water, Animals, Chemicals, Plants.
  • • Step 3: Deposition – Move sediments (tiny chunks and shavings around on tin foil to create a pile in the middle). Wind Water Human Activity Animal Activity Organic Matter Plants
  • • Step 3: Deposition – Move sediments (tiny chunks and shavings around on tin foil to create a pile in the middle).
  • • Step 4: Lithification / Cementation – Place sediment (with foil) into cupcake tin and pack the sediment together as best you can manually.
  • • Step 4: Lithification / Cementation – Place sediment (with foil) into cupcake tin and pack the sediment together as best you can manually. Cover
  • • Step 4: Lithification / Cementation – Place sediment (with foil) into cupcake tin and pack the sediment together as best you can manually. Cover Note! – Teacher shouldn’t melt wax to a liquid. Looking for semi-solid state. Very Low Heat! Watch Out for Liquid wax!
  • • Step 5: Creating a metamorphic rock: – Teacher gently warms the compacted sediment over a heat source. – Teacher safely adds some pressure and temperature together to the packet. – Teacher removes with kitchen mitts (check temp for safety) and places at students tables inside tray. – Let cool a bit so that it’s not dangerously hot / liquid wax. (Discuss intrusive vs. extrusive) – Students compress softly using textbooks again while rock is still warm. (Not liquid Wax) – Let rocks cool slowly for an extended period before opening them up. (Repeat these steps if necessary until rock appears metamorphic.)
  • • When safe! Open up foil, make some observation about the rocks and then answer the following. – Sketch rock and describe each step 1 -5 in your journal as it relates to the rock cycle.
  • 1 2 3 4 5
  • 1 2 3 4 5
  • 1 2 3 4 5
  • 1 2 3 4 5
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common igneous rocks. Sedimentary, A fine- grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud” Shale
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common igneous rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Sedimentary, A fine- grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud” Shale
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common igneous rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Obsidian Front View Igneous Rock - Forms when molten rock material cools so rapidly. The result is a volcanic glass
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common igneous rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Obsidia n Back View Obsidia n Obsidian
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common igneous rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Igneous Rock - Forms when molten rock material cools so rapidly. The result is a volcanic glass Obsidian Cut-Out
  • • NOTE! – Start small with only a few, get really good at those, and then add another rock into your practice. Each time you master a small set add another rock in until they are all mastered.
  • • NOTE! – Start small with only a few, get really good at those, and then add another rock into your practice. Each time you master a small set add another rock in until they are all mastered. – Moving the cards around on a table / clean surface is how these will help you. Just staring at them / trying to memorize them without moving and jumbling will not be as helpful.
  • • New rock from the rock cycle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • New rock from the rock cycle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Please complete this question.
  • • Note that the diagram is opposite of the one from your notes.
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. - - -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. INtrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) - - - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) - - - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) - - - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals - - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals - - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals - - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals - - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. • Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) –Larger crystals • - –- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. • Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) –Larger crystals • - –- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. • Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) –Larger crystals • - –- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Can be minutes to seconds.
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Igneous Rocks: Molten Earth cooled. Intrusive – Cooled below crust (slow) Larger crystals Extrusive – Cooled on Earth’s surface (faster). Fine grain crystals or no crystals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)? A B
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)? Which one has large crystals?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)? Which one has large crystals?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)? Which one has large crystals?
  • • Which of the rocks below cooled quickly (Extrusive) and which cooled slowly (Intrusive)? Which one has large crystals?
  • • Can rocks float?
  • • Can rocks float? • Activity! Floating a piece of pumice.
  • • Picture of floating Pumice Island. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements.
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements. (Magnesium and Iron)
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements. (Magnesium and Iron)
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements. (Magnesium and Iron) – Felsic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which have a lower percentage of the heavier elements. Have more of the lighter elements.
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements. (Magnesium and Iron) – Felsic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which have a lower percentage of the heavier elements. Have more of the lighter elements. (Silicon and oxygen, aluminum, and potassium)
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements. (Magnesium and Iron) – Felsic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which have a lower percentage of the heavier elements. Have more of the lighter elements. (Silicon and oxygen, aluminum, and potassium)
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements. (Magnesium and Iron) – Felsic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which have a lower percentage of the heavier elements. Have more of the lighter elements. (Silicon and oxygen, aluminum, and potassium)
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements. (Magnesium and Iron) – Felsic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which have a lower percentage of the heavier elements. Have more of the lighter elements. (Silicon and oxygen, aluminum, and potassium)
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements. (Magnesium and Iron) – Felsic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which have a lower percentage of the heavier elements. Have more of the lighter elements. (Silicon and oxygen, aluminum, and potassium)
  • • Igneous rocks – Mafic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are relatively high in the heavier elements. (Magnesium and Iron) – Felsic is used for silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which have a lower percentage of the heavier elements. Have more of the lighter elements. (Silicon and oxygen, aluminum, and potassium) Feldspar
  •  Igneous rocks
  •  Igneous rocks  Mafic – Darker in color (Heavy Elements)
  •  Igneous rocks  Mafic – Darker in color (Heavy Elements)  Iron, Magnesium
  •  Igneous rocks  Mafic – Darker in color (Heavy Elements)  Iron, Magnesium
  •  Igneous rocks  Mafic – Darker in color (Heavy Elements)  Iron, Magnesium  Felsic – Lighter in color (Lighter Elements)
  •  Igneous rocks  Mafic – Darker in color (Heavy Elements)  Iron, Magnesium  Felsic – Lighter in color (Lighter Elements)  Oxygen, Silicon, Aluminum,
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Which is considered mafic, and which is felsic?
  • • Note: Although Obsidian looks “Dark”
  • • Note: Although Obsidian looks “Dark” It’s actually clear and Felsic in Chemistry.
  • • Note: Although Obsidian looks “Dark” It’s actually clear and Felsic in Chemistry. Obsidian consists mainly of SiO2 (silicon dioxide), usually 70% or more
  • • Note: Although Obsidian looks “Dark” It’s actually clear and Felsic in Chemistry. Can sometimes also be an intermediate between felsic and mafic.
  • • Note: Although Obsidian looks “Dark” It’s actually clear and Felsic in Chemistry. Can sometimes also be an intermediate between felsic and mafic.
  • • Which rocks are incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice
  • • Which rocks are incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice
  • • Which rocks are incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice
  • • Which rock is incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice Basalt
  • • Which rock is incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice Basalt
  • • Which rock is incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice Basalt
  • • Which rock is incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice Basalt
  •  Classification of Igneous Rocks  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  •  Basaltic: Dark, heavy (dense) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is fine-grained so that the individual minerals are not visible. Basalt includes pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and olivine. These minerals are visible in the coarse-grained basalt called gabbro.
  • “It looked bigger in the brochure Honey”
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Granitic: Light colored, less heavy, filled with oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of micas, amphiboles and other minerals.
  •  Andesitic: Intermediate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Andesitic: Intermediate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Andesitic: Intermediate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Andesitic: Intermediate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Andesitic: Intermediate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Andesitic: Intermediate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Andesitic: Intermediate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Andesitic: Intermediate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Quiz 1-10, Is it Basaltic, Granitic or Name the Rock Band. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Quiz 1-10, Is it Basaltic, Granitic or Name the Rock Band. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Quiz 1-10, Is it Basaltic, Granitic or Name the Rock Band. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Quiz 1-10, Is it Basaltic, Granitic or Name the Rock Band. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Rock and Roll Quiz Music at… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XfRjVo5wOE
  • • Answers 1-10. Is it Basaltic, Granitic, or name that rock band. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Common Igneous Rocks  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, and mica. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, and mica. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Granite is an Igneous Rock.  Quartz and feldspar minerals, and mica. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy ?????????
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Pumice Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Obsidian  Glassy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Obsidian was an important rock to ancient peoples as it could be used as a cutting tool.
  • • Video: Flintknapping (The process of making stone tools). – Hornstone (Not Obsidian) used in video although the process is similar. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=- cHM8rfmQII&feature=fvsr
  •  Rhyolite
  •  Rhyolite
  •  Rhyolite
  •  Rhyolite
  •  Rhyolite
  •  Rhyolite
  •  Rhyolite
  •  Rhyolite
  •  Rhyolite
  • • Which is Rhyolite and which is Granite?
  • • Which is Rhyolite and which is Granite?
  • • Which is Rhyolite and which is Granite?
  • • Which is Rhyolite and which is Granite?
  • • Which is Rhyolite and which is Granite?
  • • Which is Rhyolite and which is Granite?
  • • Which is Rhyolite and which is Granite?
  • • Which is Rhyolite and which is Granite?
  • • Which rock is Obsidian and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Obsidian and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Obsidian and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Obsidian and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Obsidian and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Obsidian and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Obsidian and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Obsidian and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which pumice sample is made of heavy elements such as Iron?
  • • Which pumice sample is made of heavy elements such as Iron?
  • • Which pumice sample is made of heavy elements such as Iron?
  • • Which rock is Rhyolite, and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Rhyolite, and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Rhyolite, and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Rhyolite, and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Rhyolite, and which is Pumice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basalt.????????? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is a mixture of feldspar and pyroxene, a rock made mainly of silica and oxygen. Little… Quartz (Less than 20%)
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is a mixture of feldspar and pyroxene, a rock made mainly of silica and oxygen. Little… Quartz (Less than 20%)
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is a mixture of feldspar and pyroxene, a rock made mainly of silica and oxygen. Little… Quartz (Less than 20%)
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is a mixture of feldspar and pyroxene, a rock made mainly of silica and oxygen. Little… Quartz (Less than 20%)
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is a mixture of feldspar and pyroxene, a rock made mainly of silica and oxygen. Little… Quartz (Less than 20%)
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is a mixture of feldspar and pyroxene, a rock made mainly of silica and oxygen. Little… Quartz (Less than 20%)
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is a mixture of feldspar and pyroxene, a rock made mainly of silica and oxygen. Little… Quartz (Less than 20%)
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is a mixture of feldspar and pyroxene, a rock made mainly of silica and oxygen. Little… Quartz (Less than 20%)
  •  Basalt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Basalt is a mixture of feldspar and pyroxene, a rock made mainly of silica and oxygen. Little… Quartz (Less than 20%)
  •  Gabbro  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gabbro  Same composition as basalt but cooled slower (Intrusive) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Gabbro – A large group of dark,
  • • Gabbro – A large group of dark, coarse-grained,
  • • Gabbro – A large group of dark, coarse-grained, intrusive mafic igneous rocks chemically equivalent to basalt.
  • • Gabbro – A large group of dark, coarse-grained, intrusive mafic igneous rocks chemically equivalent to basalt.
  • • Gabbro – A large group of dark, coarse-grained, intrusive mafic igneous rocks chemically equivalent to basalt. Formed when molten magma is trapped beneath the earth's surface and cools into a crystalline mass.
  • • Gabbro – A large group of dark, coarse-grained, intrusive mafic igneous rocks chemically equivalent to basalt. Formed when molten magma is trapped beneath the earth's surface and cools into a crystalline mass. (Slowly)
  • • Gabbro
  • • Develop your film.
  • • Which rock is Basalt and which rock is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Basalt and which rock is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Basalt and which rock is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Basalt and which rock is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Basalt and which rock is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is Basalt and which rock is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer!
  • F I N D G A B B R O
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rocks below are Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock below is Gabbro? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Igneous Rocks. Learn more at… http://geology.com/rocks/igneous-rocks.shtml
  • • Which rock is incorrectly labeled below? Basalt Obsidian Rhyolite Gabbro Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! Basalt Obsidian Rhyolite Gabbro Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! Should be Pumice not Gabbro. Basalt Obsidian Rhyolite Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is correctly labeled below? Pumice Basalt Rhyolite Obsidian Gabbro Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! Rhyolite. Pumice Basalt Rhyolite Obsidian Gabbro Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! Rhyolite. Basalt Obsidian Rhyolite Pumice Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice
  • • Which rock is incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice
  • • Which rock is incorrectly labeled below? PumiceBasalt RhyoliteObsidian Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Pumice
  • • Which two rocks are switched? Obsidian Basalt Rhyolite Pumice Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! Basalt (Bottom) and Obsidian (top) Obsidian Basalt Rhyolite Pumice Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! Basalt (Bottom) and Obsidian (top) Basalt Obsidian Rhyolite Pumice Granite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • New Rock from the Rock Cycle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • New Rock from the Rock Cycle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Sedimentary Rocks  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Erosion: Process where fragments of soil and rock are broken off from the surface and carried away. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Deposition: Process by which fragments of rock are deposited in a new location. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Deposition: Process by which fragments of rock are deposited in a new location. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Deposition: Process by which fragments of rock are deposited in a new location. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Deposition: Process by which fragments of rock are deposited in a new location. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Deposition: Process by which fragments of rock are deposited in a new location. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which river is young and which is old?
  • • Which river is young and which is old?
  • • Which river is young and which is old?
  • • Which river is young and which is old?
  • • Which river is young and which is old?
  • • Which river is young and which is old?
  • • Which river is young and which is old?
  • Learn more about erosion and deposition at… http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamental s/10w.html
  • • Wind weathering: Particles of sand, pebbles, and dust are carried by wind and cause abrasion which slowly breaks down rock. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Sediments are compacted and cemented together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Caused by weathering, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Caused by weathering, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Caused by weathering, erosion, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Caused by weathering, erosion, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • “let’s see if you were paying attention.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • What is the correct order that these pictures go in? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! C, B, A. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! C, B, A. Weathering, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! C, B, A. Weathering, Erosion, Transport, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answer! C, B, A. Weathering, Erosion, Transport, and then Lithification. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • “let’s see if you were paying attention the second time.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • What is the correct order that these pictures go in? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • What is the correct order that these pictures go in? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • What is the correct order that these pictures go in? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • What is the correct order that these pictures go in? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Sediment can be transported by wind and water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Picture of sediment deposition of the Amazon Delta from space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Picture of sediment deposition of the Amazon Delta from space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Activity! Not Smart Board. – Arrange the terms into the correct order by moving them around. START END
  • • Activity! Not Smart Board. – Arrange the terms into the correct order by moving them around. START END
  • • Activity! Not Smart Board. – Arrange the terms into the correct order by moving them around. START END
  • • Activity! Not Smart Board. • Answer: START END
  •  Sedimentary Rocks  -Sediments are compacted and cemented together.  Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition.  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Usually layered. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Usually horizontal
  • ?
  • • Activity! Sedimentary Rock Core – Please use the materials provided to core out a sample of the sedimentary structure.
  • • Activity! Sedimentary Rock Core – Please use the materials provided to core out a sample of the sedimentary structure. Pipes of Coring
  • • Activity! Sedimentary Rock Core – Please use the materials provided to core out a sample of the sedimentary structure. Pipes of Coring Bore Hole
  • • Activity! Sedimentary Rock Core – Please use the materials provided to core out a sample of the sedimentary structure. Pipes of Coring Bore Hole Rock Samples
  • • A Rock Core: A cylindrical section of rock that was drilled and contains a layered structure.
  • • A Rock Core: A cylindrical section of rock that was drilled and contains a layered structure.
  • • A Rock Core: A cylindrical section of rock that was drilled and contains a layered structure. Oldest
  • • A Rock Core: A cylindrical section of rock that was drilled and contains a layered structure. Oldest Youngest
  • • A Rock Core: A cylindrical section of rock that was drilled and contains a layered structure.
  • • Ice Cores can be drilled in the ice and each layer of ice tells about the climatic conditions of the past.
  • • Activity! Drilling a Rock Core. – Stack two hunks of Earth on top of each other. – Carefully rotate and push down half of a clear milkshake straw into the hunks of Earth in a rotating manner. – Once you’ve drilled through the whole sample, carefully remove the straw and lay it on its side. – Use the scissors to cut down the straw exposing the rock layers. – Draw the rock layers and process in your journal.
  • • Activity! Drilling a Rock Core. – Stack two hunks of Earth on top of each other. – Carefully rotate and push down half of a clear milkshake straw into the hunks of Earth in a rotating manner. – Once you’ve drilled through the whole sample, carefully remove the straw and lay it on its side. – Use the scissors to cut down the straw exposing the rock layers. – Draw the rock layers and process in your journal.
  • • Visual of Experiment.
  • • Visual of Experiment.
  • • Visual of Experiment. Rotate and push down very slowly. A rock core can take days to weeks so don’t rush it.
  • • Visual of Experiment.
  • • Visual of Experiment.
  • • Visual of Experiment. Plan B if core does not work: Bite into and make a road cut.
  • • Example of “Rock Layers”
  • • Example of “Rock Layers” – Please draw a more accurate one in your journal.
  • • Example of “Rock Layers” – Please draw a more accurate one in your journal. – Which layers are the thickest?
  • • Example of “Rock Layers” – Please draw a more accurate one in your journal. – Which layers are the thickest? – Which layers are the thinnest?
  • • Example of “Rock Layers” – Please draw a more accurate one in your journal. – Which layers are the thickest? – Which layers are the thinnest? – Is there a layer which is unusual when compared to the rest?
  • • Example of “Rock Layers” – Please draw a more accurate one in your journal. – Which layers are the thickest? – Which layers are the thinnest? – Is there a layer which is unusual when compared to the rest? Learn more about rock cores at… http://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/Contexts/Volcanoes/NZ- Research/Reading-rock-core-sampl
  • Youngest Layer
  • Youngest Layer Oldest Layer
  • Youngest Layer Oldest Layer Thickest Layer
  • Youngest Layer Oldest Layer Thickest Layer Thinnest Layer
  • Youngest Layer Oldest Layer Thickest Layer Thinnest Layer Unusual Layer Older Unusual Layer
  • Youngest Layer Oldest Layer Thickest Layer Thinnest Layer Unusual Layer Older Unusual Layer 8 Layers found in this sample
  • Youngest Layer Oldest Layer Thickest Layer Thinnest Layer Unusual Layer Older Unusual Layer 8 Layers found in this sample
  • • Where are these sedimentary rocks?
  • • Answer! Mars
  • The Big Idea that core samples tell us is…
  • Core samples let us look far into the past to see processes that are happening today.
  •  Sedimentary Rocks  Sediments are compacted and cemented together.  Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition.  Usually layered  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Layers can be from old living materials (fossils). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Sedimentary Rocks  Sediments are compacted and cemented together.  Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition.  Usually layered  Layers can be fossils and old living materials Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which is a bogus statement about sedimentary rocks from the list below? A.) Sediments are gathered from cooling lava that forms crystals very quickly. B.) Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition. C.) Usually layered D.) Layers can be fossils and old living materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which is a bogus statement about sedimentary rocks from the list below? A.) Sediments are gathered from cooling lava that forms crystals very quickly. B.) Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition. C.) Usually layered D.) Layers can be fossils and old living materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which is a bogus statement about sedimentary rocks from the list below? A.) Sediments are gathered from from erosion, transport and deposition. B.) Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition. C.) Usually layered D.) Layers can be fossils and old living materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which is a bogus statement about sedimentary rocks from the list below? A.) Sediments are gathered from erosion, transport and deposition. B.) Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition. C.) Layers must be horizontal. D.) Layers can be fossils and old living materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which is a bogus statement about sedimentary rocks from the list below? A.) Sediments are gathered from erosion, transport and deposition. B.) Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition. C.) Layers must be horizontal. D.) Layers can be fossils and old living materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which is a bogus statement about sedimentary rocks from the list below? A.) Sediments are gathered from erosion, transport and deposition. B.) Caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition. C.) Usually layered. D.) Layers can be fossils and old living materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Gravel Conglomerate
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Gravel Conglomerate
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Gravel Conglomerate
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Gravel Conglomerate
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Gravel Conglomerate
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Gravel Conglomerate Cemented Shells, Limestone can also form from dissolved minerals
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Gravel Conglomerate
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Gravel Conglomerate Cemented Shells,
  • • The 3 types of Sedimentary Rocks – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Gravel Conglomerate Cemented Shells, Limestone can also form from dissolved minerals Tavertine
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms.
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. Sometimes Chemical
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Which Sedimentary Rock is which? – Clastic: Small pieces of rock are “lithified” or cemented together. – Chemical: Standing water evaporates and leaves dissolved minerals behind. – Organic: The accumulation of debris by living organisms. A B
  • • Please mention three things about this rock.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock in one sentence.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock in one sentence.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock in one sentence.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock in one sentence.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock in one sentence.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock.
  • • Please mention three things about this rock.
  • • Activity! Making Conglomerate or Sandstone Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Activity! Making Conglomerate or Sandstone – Add glue to inside of plastic cup, 1/5 at bottom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Glue
  • • Activity! Making Conglomerate or Sandstone – Add glue to inside of plastic cup, 1/5 at bottom. – Take Sand (sandstone), Pebbles, and other chunks from the bin (Conglomerate). – Add materials, sand, gravel, stir, and then compact. – Place at window to dry and remove from cup in several days. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Glue
  • • Activity! Making Conglomerate or Sandstone – Add glue to inside of plastic cup, 1/5 at bottom. – Take Sand (sandstone), Pebbles, and other chunks from the bin (Conglomerate). – Add materials, sand, gravel, stir, and then compact. – Place at window to dry and remove from cup in several days. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Glue
  • • Activity! Making Conglomerate or Sandstone – Add glue to inside of plastic cup, 1/5 at bottom. – Take Sand (sandstone), Pebbles, and other chunks from the bin (Conglomerate). – Add materials, sand, gravel, stir, and then compact. – Place at window to dry and remove from cup in several days. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Glue Until completely Dry and hardened
  • • Activity! Making Conglomerate or Sandstone – Add glue to inside of plastic cup, 1/5 at bottom. – Take Sand (sandstone), Pebbles, and other chunks from the bin (Conglomerate). – Add materials, sand, gravel, stir, and then compact. – Place at window to dry and remove from cup in several days. Cementing / Lithification Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Glue Until completely Dry and hardened
  •  Common Sedimentary Rocks  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Limestone. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone is a sedimentary rock made up of calcite (CaCO3) as its main mineral. – Some Limestones are formed by chemical deposition and others by the accumulation of shells from small sea creatures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone is a sedimentary rock made up of calcite (CaCO3) as its main mineral. – Some Limestone is formed by chemical deposition and others by the accumulation of shells from small sea creatures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone is a sedimentary rock made up of calcite (CaCO3) as its main mineral. – Some Limestone is formed by chemical deposition and others by the accumulation of shells from small sea creatures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone is a sedimentary rock made up of calcite (CaCO3) as its main mineral. – Some Limestone is formed by chemical deposition and others by the accumulation of shells from small sea creatures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone is a sedimentary rock made up of calcite (CaCO3) as its main mineral. – Some Limestone is formed by chemical deposition and others by the accumulation of shells from small sea creatures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone is a sedimentary rock made up of calcite (CaCO3) as its main mineral. – Some Limestone is formed by chemical deposition and others by the accumulation of shells from small sea creatures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone is a sedimentary rock made up of calcite (CaCO3) as its main mineral. – Some Limestone is formed by chemical deposition and others by the accumulation of shells from small sea creatures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Geologist will often carry hydrochloric acid to use on rocks. – Hydrochloric acid (HCL) reacts with calcium carbonate. CaCO3 + 2HCl -> CaCl2 + H2O + CO2 (g)
  • • Demonstration (Optional) – Teacher will drop some HCL on two different rocks. Which one was limestone? Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBTasvLEsJ8
  • Chalk is made from the shells of single-celled, calcium carbonate secreting creatures from long ago.
  •  Sandstone. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Wind and water transport layers of sand sediment that hardens into rock. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Shale. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Shale forms from very small grained particles and organic matter forming rock.
  • • Oil Shale, know as Kerogen Shale – Has lots of organic matter that can be extracted as oils and gases (hydrocarbons) Learn more about oil shale at http://geology.com/usgs/oil-shale/
  • • Oil Shale, know as Kerogen Shale – Has lots of organic matter that can be extracted as oils and gases (hydrocarbons) Learn more about oil shale at http://geology.com/usgs/oil-shale/
  • • Burgess Shale (Paleozoic).
  • • Burgess Shale: A very important site that has found thousands of Paleozoic fossils. – Great example of an ocean environment on top of a mountain. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Activity! Making a fossil in the Burgess Shale. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Activity! Making a fossil in the Burgess Shale. – Obtain a piece of clay. – Smooth it out so it is long and flat. – Press shells into it to make fossil imprints. – Pass to friend and record shapes in journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Cool animation of a fossil specimen (Anomalocaris) found in shale. (3 feet long!)
  • The Burgess Shale shows us that the earth is…
  • The earth is old and life forms have changed over time.
  •  Conglomerate Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is limestone, and which rock is sandstone? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is shale and which rock is conglomerate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is shale and which rock is conglomerate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is shale and which rock is conglomerate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is shale and which rock is conglomerate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is shale and which rock is conglomerate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Picture of Conglomerate from Mars. – Evidence of water / stream beds / mud.
  • • Which rock below is not sedimentary? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Granite. It’s Igneous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Granite. It’s Igneous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Granite. It’s Igneous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Granite. It’s Igneous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Granite. It’s Igneous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Granite. It’s Igneous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Can you name the rock? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Can you name the rock? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Can you name the rock? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Can you name the rock? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Can you name the rock? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Can you name the rock? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Can you name the rock? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Can you name the rock? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Which rock is a sedimentary rock? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common sedimentary rocks. Sedimentary, A fine- grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud” Shale
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common sedimentary rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Sedimentary, A fine- grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud” Shale
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common sedimentary rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Sedimentary, A fine- grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud” Shale Front View
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common sedimentary rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Shale Back View Shale Shale
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common sedimentary rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Sedimentary, A fine- grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud” Shale Cut-Out
  • • NOTE! – Start small with only a few, get really good at those, and then add another rock into your practice. Each time you master a small set add another rock in until they are all mastered. – Moving the cards around on a table / clean surface is how these will help you. Just staring at them / trying to memorize them without moving and jumbling will not be helpful. Common Sedimentary Rocks. Learn more at… http://geology.com/rocks/sedimentary-rocks.shtml
  • • New rock from the rock cycle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • New rock from the rock cycle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • New rock from the rock cycle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • New rock from the rock cycle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Metamorphic: Rock that changed forms due to extreme temperature and pressures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Metamorphic: Rock that changed forms due to extreme temperature and pressures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Metamorphic: Rock that changed forms due to extreme temperature and pressures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • The Metamorphic rock can change form by.
  • • The Metamorphic rock can change form by. – Mineral changes - Growth of new minerals.
  • • The Metamorphic rock can change form by. – Mineral changes - Growth of new minerals. – Textural changes - recrystallization
  • • The Metamorphic rock can change form by. – Mineral changes - Growth of new minerals. – Textural changes - recrystallization
  • • The Metamorphic rock can change form by. – Mineral changes - Growth of new minerals. – Textural changes - recrystallization
  • • The Metamorphic rock can change form by. – Mineral changes - Growth of new minerals. – Textural changes - recrystallization
  • • If a metamorphic rock gets hot and melts, it becomes igneous. – The cycle starts over. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • If a metamorphic rock gets hot and melts, it becomes igneous. – The cycle starts over. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • If a metamorphic rock gets hot and melts, it becomes igneous. – The cycle starts over. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • If a metamorphic rock gets hot and melts, it becomes igneous. – The cycle starts over. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Metamorphic rock can be divided into two categories.  Foliated: Banded layers  Non-foliated: Not Banded
  •  Metamorphic rock can be divided into two categories.  Foliated: Banded layers  Non-foliated: Not Banded
  •  Metamorphic rock can be divided into two categories.  Foliated: Banded layers  Non-foliated: Not Banded
  •  Metamorphic rock can be divided into two categories.  Foliated: Banded layers  Non-foliated: Not Banded
  •  Metamorphic rock can be divided into two categories.  Foliated: Banded layers  Non-foliated: Not Banded
  •  Metamorphic rock can be divided into two categories.  Foliated: Banded layers  Non-foliated: Not Banded
  •  Metamorphic rock can be divided into two categories.  Foliated: Banded layers  Non-foliated: Not Banded
  •  Metamorphic rock can be divided into two categories.  Foliated: Banded layers  Non-foliated: Not Banded
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: • Schist: • Gneiss:
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: • Gneiss:
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss:
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • What do the notes / colors mean below? • Foliated Metamorphic Rock • Slate: Hot • Schist: Really Hot • Gneiss: Super Hot Foliated: (Metamorphic) formed within the Earth's interior under extremely high pressures. These pressures are often unequal with greater pressure in one direction than in the others. This causes the minerals in the rock to reorient themselves to the greatest pressure direction. This gives the foliated metamorphic rock a stripped look.
  • • Activity! Foliated or Non-Foliated? 1-10
  • • Activity! Foliated or Non-Foliated? 1-10
  • • Activity! Foliated or Non-Foliated? 1-10
  • • Activity! Foliated or Non-Foliated? 1-10 Back and forth
  • • Activity! Foliated or Non-Foliated? 1-10
  • • Activity! Foliated or Non-Foliated? 1-10
  • • Activity! Foliated or Non-Foliated? 1-10 It’s a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll. Optional music for activity http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFlNo1NjAEQ
  • • Bonus: What T.V. Channel did we first appear on?
  • • Bonus: What T.V. Channel did we first appear on? MTV
  • • Limestone Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone becomes Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone becomes marble Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone becomes marble Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Limestone becomes marble Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • A sedimentary rock like a conglomerate Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • A sedimentary rock like a conglomerate can be pressed into a metamorphic rock such as Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • A sedimentary rock like a conglomerate can be pressed into a metamorphic rock such as metaconglomerate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Activity! Creating the metamorphic process with clay. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Directions 1.) Smooth out different layers of clay and lay on top of each other (Sedimentary). 2.) Draw a before picture in your journal. 4.) Smoosh layers to show compressed nature or Metamorphic Rocks. 5.) Draw and after in your journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Common Metamorphic Rocks.  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Slate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • “Can anybody in the class pronounce my name.” “My name is Gneiss.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • “Gneiss sounds just like nice.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • “It has been Gneiss to meet you.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Get out here dumb rock.”
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “That wasn’t very Gneiss.”
  •  Gneiss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gneiss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gneiss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Gneiss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Gneiss striped bandings
  •  Gneiss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Gneiss Gneissic bandings
  •  Marble. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Marble. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Marble. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Marble. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Is marble a foliated or non-foliated metamorphic rock?”
  •  Marble. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Is marble a foliated or non-foliated metamorphic rock?”
  •  Marble. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  •  Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The mica will form a sheetlike orientation in the rock that is called…
  •  Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The mica will form a sheetlike orientation in the rock that is called… schistosity.
  • Metamorphic rocks tell us that the earth is…
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common metamorphic rocks. Sedimentary, A fine- grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud” Shale
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common metamorphic rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Sedimentary, A fine- grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud” Shale
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common metamorphic rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Metamorphic – Foliated, It often contains significant amounts of mica. Schist Front View
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common metamorphic rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Schis t Back View Schist Schist
  • • Activity! Learning to identify rocks. – Please use the provided flashcards / rock kits to memorize the names and some general uses / facts about common metamorphic rocks. – Write the name of the rock on the back of the flashcards. Then cut the flash cards out and try to line up the three boxes to complete each mineral. Schist Cut-Out Metamorphic – Foliated, It often contains significant amounts of mica.
  • • NOTE! – Start small with only a few, get really good at those, and then add another rock into your practice. Each time you master a small set add another rock in until they are all mastered. – Moving the cards around on a table / clean surface is how these will help you. Just staring at them / trying to memorize them without moving and jumbling will not be as helpful.
  • • Study this chart for 2 minutes and then challenge the teacher to a tic-tac-toe game. – Minimize out of slideshow on the next slide. • Spaces provided to put X or O. – Each three in a row gets one point. Most points at the end wins. XXXX = two points.
  • • Activity! Learning to identify Rocks. – You will be given class time to memorize the small collection of rocks. – Learn the names and which is Igneous, Metamorphic, and Sedimentary. – You will then be assessed on how well you can identify them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • This ancient great wall was actually built of wood, earth, grass, and three principal different types of stone: granite (igneous rock), white marble (metamorphic rock) and sandstone and limestone (sedimentary rock).
  • This ancient great wall was actually built of wood, earth, grass, and three principal different types of stone: granite (igneous rock), white marble (metamorphic rock) and sandstone and limestone (sedimentary rock).
  • This ancient great wall was actually built of wood, earth, grass, and three principal different types of stone: granite (igneous rock), white marble (metamorphic rock) and sandstone and limestone (sedimentary rock).
  • This ancient great wall was actually built of wood, earth, grass, and three principal different types of stone: granite (igneous rock), white marble (metamorphic rock) and sandstone and limestone (sedimentary rock).
  • This ancient great wall was actually built of wood, earth, grass, and three principal different types of stone: granite (igneous rock), white marble (metamorphic rock) and sandstone and limestone (sedimentary rock).
  • This ancient great wall was actually built of wood, earth, grass, and three principal different types of stone: granite (igneous rock), white marble (metamorphic rock) and sandstone and limestone (sedimentary rock).
  • This ancient great wall was actually built of wood, earth, grass, and three principal different types of stone: granite (igneous rock), white marble (metamorphic rock) and sandstone and limestone (sedimentary rock).
  • • Activity! On-line rock identification challenge. – A good warm-up for the quiz ahead. – http://www.kidsgeo.com/geology-games/rocks- game.php Learn more about metamorphic rocks at… http://geology.com/rocks/metamorphic-rocks.shtml
  • • Song of Rocks – The most bizarre video I could find. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehcshoYIIM4
  • • Please complete the next two quizzes on your homework sheet.
  • • Quiz Wiz 1-10 Igneous, Metamorphic, Sedimentary + Name the rock for a bonus. • Work on Unit Assessment Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Teacher will invite groups up to the mystery rock.
  • • What movie is this?
  • • Answers! Quiz Wiz 1-10 Igneous, Metamorphic, Sedimentary + Name the rock for a bonus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Teacher will invite groups up to the mystery rock.
  • • What movie is this?
  • • Answer! School of Rock (2003).
  • • Please complete this question.
  • • Rocks Music Video Link! – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_4Y21Ppr zw&feature=results_video&playnext=1&list=P LFA1C870D09D1B48E
  • • Please complete the next two quizzes on your homework sheet.
  • • Quiz Wiz 1-10 Name the rock. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1 Igneous Rock – Extrusive, a light-colored, fine-grained rock that typically contains quartz and feldspar minerals.
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2 Sedimentary, A fine-grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay- size mineral particles  “Mud”
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3 Igneous Rock – Intrusive with large crystals. Composed mainly of quartz and feldspar.
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4 Igneous Rock – Intrusive, Coarse- grained, dark-colored. It is usually black or dark green in color. It is the most abundant rock in the deep oceanic crust.
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5 Sedimentary - Composed primarily of calcium carbonate – (Calcite), forms in marine waters and often has fossils.
  • 6
  • 6 .
  • 6 Sedimentary, clastic rock made up mainly of sand. Found in environments where large amounts of sand can accumulate.
  • • Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7 .
  • • Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7
  • • Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7 Metamorphic – Foliated, It often contains significant amounts of mica.
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8 Igneous Rock – Dark Colored. Extrusive with fine grain crystals. Forms from cooled lava.
  • 8 Igneous Rock – Dark Colored. Extrusive with fine grain crystals. Forms from cooled lava.
  • 8 Igneous Rock – Dark Colored. Extrusive with fine grain crystals. Forms from cooled lava.
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9 Igneous Rock – Extrusive, A light- colored rock. It forms through very rapid cooling.
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10 Metamorphic, Non- foliated rock that is produced from the metamorphism of limestone. It is composed primarily of calcium carbonate.
  • *11
  • *11
  • *11 Sedimentary, -Clastic Rock that contains large rounded clasts. The space between the clasts is generally filled with small particles that binds the rock together.
  • *12 “Who am I?”
  • • Answers! Quiz Wiz 1-10 Name that Rock. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Answers! Quiz Wiz 1-10 Name that Rock. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1 Igneous Rock – Extrusive, a light-colored, fine-grained rock that typically contains quartz and feldspar minerals.
  • 1 Igneous Rock – Extrusive, a light-colored, fine-grained rock that typically contains quartz and feldspar minerals.
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2 Sedimentary, A fine-grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay- size mineral particles  “Mud”
  • 2 Sedimentary, A fine-grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay- size mineral particles  “Mud”
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3 Igneous Rock – Intrusive with large crystals. Composed mainly of quartz and feldspar.
  • 3 Igneous Rock – Intrusive with large crystals. Composed mainly of quartz and feldspar.
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4 Igneous Rock – Intrusive, Coarse- grained, dark-colored. It is usually black or dark green in color. It is the most abundant rock in the deep oceanic crust.
  • 4 Igneous Rock – Intrusive, Coarse- grained, dark-colored. It is usually black or dark green in color. It is the most abundant rock in the deep oceanic crust.
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5 Sedimentary - Composed primarily of calcium carbonate – (Calcite), forms in marine waters and often has fossils.
  • 5 Sedimentary - Composed primarily of calcium carbonate – (Calcite), forms in marine waters and often has fossils.
  • 6
  • 6 .
  • 6 Sedimentary, clastic rock made up mainly of sand. Found in environments where large amounts of sand can accumulate.
  • 6 Sedimentary, clastic rock made up mainly of sand. Found in environments where large amounts of sand can accumulate.
  • • Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7 .
  • • Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7
  • • Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7 Metamorphic – Foliated, It often contains significant amounts of mica.
  • • Schist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7 Metamorphic – Foliated, It often contains significant amounts of mica.
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8 Igneous Rock – Dark Colored. Extrusive with fine grain crystals. Forms from cooled lava.
  • 8 Igneous Rock – Dark Colored. Extrusive with fine grain crystals. Forms from cooled lava.
  • 8 Igneous Rock – Dark Colored. Extrusive with fine grain crystals. Forms from cooled lava.
  • 8 Igneous Rock – Dark Colored. Extrusive with fine grain crystals. Forms from cooled lava.
  • 8 Igneous Rock – Dark Colored. Extrusive with fine grain crystals. Forms from cooled lava.
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9 Igneous Rock – Extrusive, A light- colored rock. It forms through very rapid cooling.
  • 9 Igneous Rock – Extrusive, A light- colored rock. It forms through very rapid cooling.
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10 Metamorphic, Non- foliated rock that is produced from the metamorphism of limestone. It is composed primarily of calcium carbonate.
  • 10 Metamorphic, Non- foliated rock that is produced from the metamorphism of limestone. It is composed primarily of calcium carbonate.
  • *11
  • *11
  • *11 Sedimentary, -Clastic Rock that contains large rounded clasts. The space between the clasts is generally filled with small particles that binds the rock together.
  • *11 Sedimentary, -Clastic Rock that contains large rounded clasts. The space between the clasts is generally filled with small particles that binds the rock together.
  • *12 “Who am I?”
  • *12 “It’s gneiss being Kid-rock”
  • • Write down a number from 1-500 on the note card and write your name under it. – Teacher to collect note cards at end. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Rock and Mineral Auction Project
  • • Rock and Mineral Auction Project “The number you wrote down is how much money you have for the auction.”
  • • Auction Rules – Do not bid higher than the monopoly money that you have. – Raise hand and or murmur something such as “Yuup” or “Here” or “Yah” when you want to bid. – Do not be vocal unless you are bidding. – Once you’ve bid, see cashier to collect rock / mineral and pay. – No giving away your money. You can only bid once. – All rocks / minerals will be passed out at the end to all that not win a bid. – Your rock / mineral becomes the focus of your research and poster.
  • If you win a rock / mineral you get a prize when you hand-in your money to the auction banker.
  • • Item #1 Bauxite Mineral • This ore is the main source of aluminum which the most abundant mineral in the earth’s crust.
  • • Item #2 Gypsum Mineral • Processed and used as prefabricated wallboard or an industrial or building plaster.
  • • Item #3 Quartz Mineral • The most common mineral on the face of the Earth. In every rock type. Primary mineral >98%.
  • • Item #4. Sulfur Mineral • Used in the manufacturing of acid, fertilizers, chemicals, explosives. Smells of rotten eggs, biologically important.
  • • Item #5. Hematite Mineral • Iron Ioxide - black colored or reddish brown (rust-like) Named for the Greek word blood.
  • • Item #6. Mica / Muscovite Mineral • Mineral made of aluminum and potassium. Has a cleavage that can form sheets. Can be transparent or translucent.
  • • Item #7. Graphite Mineral • A high grade of coal. Made of carbon, found in pencils, conducts electricity. Has luster / shine. Can be a lubricant. 5
  • • Item #8. Fluorite Mineral • Colorful mineral in light. Well known and prized for its glassy luster and rich variety of colors.
  • • Item #9 Pyrite Mineral • An iron sulfide often called “Fools Gold”. Used to create a spark in ancient times. Used in paper today and to create sulfuric acid.
  • • Item #10. Feldspar Mineral • A rock-forming mineral (Aluminum and Silica) industrially important in glass.
  • • Item #11. Halite Mineral • Used in human and animal diet, food seasoning and food preservations. Helps to melt ice.
  • • Item #12. Topaz Mineral • A sought after crystal that is formed from a silicate mineral of aluminium and fluorine. Colorless
  • • Item #13. Galena Mineral • Common mineral containing lead. May form cubes and has luster/shine.
  • • Item #14. Corundum Mineral • It is an exceptionally hard aluminum oxide that forms in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Makes rubies and sapphires.
  • • Item #15. Granite – Igneous Rock • Igneous Rock – Intrusive with large crystals. Composed mainly of quartz and feldspar minerals.
  • • Item #16. Basalt – Igneous Rock • Igneous Rock – Dark Colored. Extrusive with fine grain crystals. Forms from cooled lava.
  • • Item #17. Obsidian, Igneous Rock • Igneous Rock - Forms when molten rock material cools so rapidly. The result is a volcanic glass
  • • Item #18. Pumice • Igneous Rock – Extrusive, A light-colored rock. It forms through very rapid cooling.
  • • Item #19. Gabbro –Igneous • Igneous Rock – Intrusive, Coarse-grained, dark- colored. It is usually black or dark green in color. It is the most abundant rock in the deep oceanic crust.
  • • Item #20. Shale - Sedimentary • Sedimentary, A fine-grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud”
  • • Item #21. Limestone - Sedimentary • Sedimentary, A fine-grained rock that forms from the compaction of silt and clay-size mineral particles  “Mud”
  • • Item #22. Sandstone – Sedimentary • Sedimentary, clastic rock made up mainly of sand. Found in environments where large amounts of sand can accumulate.
  • • Item #23. Marble – Metamorphic Rock • Metamorphic, Non-foliated rock that is produced from the metamorphism of limestone. It is composed primarily of calcium carbonate.
  • • Item #24. Schist – Metamorphic • Metamorphic – Foliated, It often contains significant amounts of mica.
  • Final Item
  • • Final Item #25. Slate – Metamorphic • Metamorphic – Foliated, is fine-grained. Formed from shale and used for roofing and flooring.
  • Rocks can be very…
  • Rocks can be very… Resourceful
  • Name of Rock /Mineral Chemistry: Magnesium Silicate or type of crystal if a mineral Type or Rock: Igneous, Sedimentary, Metamorphic Section / story about how your rock / mineral got here. Describe the physical properties of your rock/mineral Where is your rock / mineral is found on Earth and how is it used in products? Other important information that you discover. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Rock Auction Poster links for research – http://geology.com/rocks/ – http://ratw.asu.edu/aboutrocks_whatarerocks _2.html – Igneous Rocks http://csmres.jmu.edu/geollab/fichter/IgnRx/Ig Alphabetical.html
  • • Homework bundle due shortly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • You can now record information in the white space around the following drawings. – Color only the drawings not the white space.
  • • Try and guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • Try and guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • “Here comes a magic trick with pumice.”
  • “Mafnificent.”
  • • Try and guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “It’s so Gneiss that this unit is almost over….”
  • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “It’s so Gneiss that this unit is almost over….”
  • • Try and guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • “Here comes a gneiss magic trick. I’m going to disappear.”
  • • Activity! Rocks PowerPoint Review Game Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:
  • • This part of the PowerPoint roadmap is just one small part of my Geology Topics Unit. This unit includes… • A six part 6,000 Slide PowerPoint Presentation / unit roadmap full of activities, review questions, games, video links, flashcards, materials list, and much more. • A 18 bundled homework package, modified version, 19 pages of unit notes, 6 PowerPoint Review Games of 100+ slides each, videos, rubrics, and much more that all chronologically follow the unit slideshow. • This is a fantastic unit for any Earth Science Class. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html
  • Areas of Focus within The Geology Topics Unit: -Areas of Focus within The Geology Topics Unit: Plate Tectonics, Evidence for Plate Tectonics, Pangea, Energy Waves, Layers of the Earth, Heat Transfer, Types of Crust, Plate Boundaries, Hot Spots, Volcanoes, Positives and Negatives of Volcanoes, Types of Volcanoes, Parts of a Volcano, Magma, Types of Lava, Viscosity, Earthquakes, Faults, Folds, Seismograph, Richter Scale, Seismograph, Tsunami’s, Rocks, Minerals, Crystals, Uses of Minerals, Types of Crystals, Physical Properties of Minerals, Rock Cycle, Common Igneous Rocks, Common Sedimentary Rocks, Common Metamorphic Rocks., Age of the Earth, Uniformitarianism, Principle of Superposition, Earth History, Time Units, Timeline of Events, Basic Evolution, Mass Extinction Events, Dinosaurs, Early Mammals, and more. Full Unit can be found at… http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html
  • • This was a very brief tour. Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum package. – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  • Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  • • More Units Available at… Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The Rivers and Water Quality Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and Science Skills Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and The Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
  • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link: