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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Atoms and Periodic Table of the Elements unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 2000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 12 page ...

This PowerPoint is one small part of the Atoms and Periodic Table of the Elements unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 2000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 12 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 15 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus: -Atoms (Atomic Force Microscopes), Rutherford's Gold Foil Experiment, Cathode Tube, Atoms, Fundamental Particles, The Nucleus, Isotopes, AMU, Size of Atoms and Particles, Quarks, Recipe of the Universe, Atomic Theory, Atomic Symbols, #'s, Valence Electrons, Octet Rule, SPONCH Atoms, Molecules, Hydrocarbons (Structure), Alcohols (Structure), Proteins (Structure), Periodic Table of the Elements, Organization of Periodic Table, Transition Metals, Electron Negativity, Non-Metals, Metals, Metalloids, Atomic Bonds, Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Metallic Bonds, Ionization, and much more.

This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

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Quarks Physical Science Lesson PowerPoint Presentation Transcript

  • 1. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indents when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Neutron Proton Electron
  • 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 3. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  • 4. ATOM Nucleus Proton Neutron Quark Electron Molecule
  • 5. • Particle Physics Standard Model • Everything in the universe is made from twelve building blocks called fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four fundamental forces. – Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces.
  • 6. • Particle Physics Standard Model • Everything in the universe is made from twelve building blocks called fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four fundamental forces. – Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces.
  • 7. • Particle Physics Standard Model • Everything in the universe is made from twelve building blocks called fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four fundamental forces. – Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces.
  • 8. • Particle Physics Standard Model • Everything in the universe is made from twelve building blocks called fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four fundamental forces. – Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces.
  • 9. • Particle Physics Standard Model • Everything in the universe is made from twelve building blocks called fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four fundamental forces. – Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces.
  • 10. • Particle Physics Standard Model • Everything in the universe is made from twelve building blocks called fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four fundamental forces. – Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces.
  • 11. • Particle Physics Standard Model • Everything in the universe is made from twelve building blocks called fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four fundamental forces. – Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces.
  • 12. • Particle Physics Standard Model • Everything in the universe is made from twelve building blocks called fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four fundamental forces. – Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces.
  • 13. • Particle Physics Standard Model • Everything in the universe is made from twelve building blocks called fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four fundamental forces. – Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces.
  • 14.  Physicists have discovered that protons and neutrons (Hadrons) are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.  Just bigger than an electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 15.  Physicists have discovered that protons and neutrons (Hadrons) are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.  Just bigger than an electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 16.  Physicists have discovered that protons and neutrons (Hadrons) are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.  Just bigger than an electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 17.  Physicists have discovered that protons and neutrons (Hadrons) are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.  Just bigger than an electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force.
  • 18.  Physicists have discovered that protons and neutrons (Hadrons) are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.  Just bigger than an electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force. The proton and neutron are baryons (family of hadrons) which are made of three quarks.
  • 19.  Physicists have discovered that protons and neutrons (Hadrons) are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.  Just bigger than an electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force. The proton and neutron are baryons (family of hadrons) which are made of three quarks. Meson: A subatomic particles composed of one quark and one antiquark, bound together by the strong interaction.
  • 20.  Physicists have discovered that protons and neutrons (Hadrons) are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.  Just bigger than an electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force. The proton and neutron are baryons (family of hadrons) which are made of three quarks. Meson: A subatomic particles composed of one quark and one antiquark, bound together by the strong interaction. Mesons are Bosons.
  • 21.  Physicists have discovered that protons and neutrons (Hadrons) are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.  Just bigger than an electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force. The proton and neutron are baryons (family of hadrons) which are made of three quarks. Meson: A subatomic particles composed of one quark and one antiquark, bound together by the strong interaction. Mesons are Bosons.
  • 22. • Spin / rotation of particles is at the heart of quantum strangeness. Spin spin-1/2 spin-1 spin-2 Higgs bosons Quarks, electrons, muons, taus, neutrinos Photons, W, Z bosons, gluons Gravitons The proton consists of two up quarks and one down quark (if you sum up the electrical charges of this combination you get +1, the charge of the proton: 2/3 + 2/3 - 1/3 = 3/3 = 1) The neutron is a combination of two down quarks and one up quark (and again, if you combine the electrical charges, they sum up to zero: it's therfore electrically neutral)
  • 23. • Spin / rotation of particles is at the heart of quantum strangeness. Spin spin-1/2 spin-1 spin-2 Higgs bosons Quarks, electrons, muons, taus, neutrinos Photons, W, Z bosons, gluons Gravitons The proton consists of two up quarks and one down quark (if you sum up the electrical charges of this combination you get +1, the charge of the proton: 2/3 + 2/3 - 1/3 = 3/3 = 1) The neutron is a combination of two down quarks and one up quark (and again, if you combine the electrical charges, they sum up to zero: it's therfore electrically neutral)
  • 24. • Spin / rotation of particles is at the heart of quantum strangeness. Spin spin-1/2 spin-1 spin-2 Higgs bosons Quarks, electrons, muons, taus, neutrinos Photons, W, Z bosons, gluons Gravitons The proton consists of two up quarks and one down quark (if you sum up the electrical charges of this combination you get +1, the charge of the proton: 2/3 + 2/3 - 1/3 = 3/3 = 1) The neutron is a combination of two down quarks and one up quark (and again, if you combine the electrical charges, they sum up to zero: it's therfore electrically neutral)
  • 25. • Spin / rotation of particles is at the heart of quantum strangeness. Spin spin-1/2 spin-1 spin-2 Higgs bosons Quarks, electrons, muons, taus, neutrinos Photons, W, Z bosons, gluons Gravitons The proton consists of two up quarks and one down quark (if you sum up the electrical charges of this combination you get +1, the charge of the proton: 2/3 + 2/3 - 1/3 = 3/3 = 1) The neutron is a combination of two down quarks and one up quark (and again, if you combine the electrical charges, they sum up to zero: it's therfore electrically neutral) Spin isn’t a great analogy. Don’t think like a top spinning. Think more of orientations in a magnetic field.
  • 26. • Spin / rotation of particles is at the heart of quantum strangeness. Spin spin-1/2 spin-1 spin-2 Higgs bosons Quarks, electrons, muons, taus, neutrinos Photons, W, Z bosons, gluons Gravitons The proton consists of two up quarks and one down quark (if you sum up the electrical charges of this combination you get +1, the charge of the proton: 2/3 + 2/3 - 1/3 = 3/3 = 1) The neutron is a combination of two down quarks and one up quark (and again, if you combine the electrical charges, they sum up to zero: it's therfore electrically neutral) Spin isn’t a great analogy. Don’t think like a top spinning. Think more of orientations in a magnetic field.
  • 27. • Spin / rotation of particles is at the heart of quantum strangeness. Spin spin-1/2 spin-1 spin-2 Higgs bosons Quarks, electrons, muons, taus, neutrinos Photons, W, Z bosons, gluons Gravitons The proton consists of two up quarks and one down quark (if you sum up the electrical charges / spin of this combination you get +1, the charge of the proton).
  • 28. • Spin / rotation of particles is at the heart of quantum strangeness. Spin spin-1/2 spin-1 spin-2 Higgs bosons Quarks, electrons, muons, taus, neutrinos Photons, W, Z bosons, gluons Gravitons The proton consists of two up quarks and one down quark (if you sum up the electrical charges / spin of this combination you get +1, the charge of the proton). The neutron is a combination of two down quarks and one up quark (and again, if you combine the electrical charges, they sum up to zero: it's therefore electrically neutral)
  • 29. • Which is a Baryon, and which is a Meson? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 30. • Which is a Baryon, and which is a Meson? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force. The proton and neutron are baryons (family of hadrons) which are made of three quarks. Meson: Subatomic particles composed of one quark and one antiquark, bound together by the strong interaction.
  • 31. • Which is a Baryon, and which is a Meson? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force. The proton and neutron are baryons (family of hadrons) which are made of three quarks. Meson: Subatomic particles composed of one quark and one antiquark, bound together by the strong interaction.
  • 32. • Which is a Baryon, and which is a Meson? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force. The proton and neutron are baryons (family of hadrons) which are made of three quarks. Meson: Subatomic particles composed of one quark and one antiquark, bound together by the strong interaction.
  • 33. • Which is a Baryon, and which is a Meson? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force. The proton and neutron are baryons (family of hadrons) which are made of three quarks. Meson: Subatomic particles composed of one quark and one antiquark, bound together by the strong interaction.
  • 34. • Which is a Baryon, and which is a Meson? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Hadron: A composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force. The proton and neutron are baryons (family of hadrons) which are made of three quarks. Meson: Subatomic particles composed of one quark and one antiquark, bound together by the strong interaction.
  • 35.  Gluons: Holds Quarks together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 36.  Gluons: Holds Quarks together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 37.  Gluons: Holds Quarks together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 38.  The Proton is composed of two up quarks, one down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 39.  The Proton is composed of two up quarks, one down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 40.  The Proton is composed of two up quarks, one down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 41.  The Proton is composed of two up quarks, one down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 42.  The Proton is composed of two up quarks, one down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 43.  The Proton is composed of two up quarks, one down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 44.  The Proton is composed of two up quarks, one down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 45. • If your up! (Protons have two Up Quarks) your more positive. Positive = Proton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 46. • If your up! (Protons have two Up Quarks) your more positive. Positive = Proton. U U Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 47. “Am I a Up Quark, or am I a Down Quark, or just a kitten?”
  • 48. “I am a positive Up Quark Kitty!”
  • 49.  A neutron is composed of two down quarks and one up quark. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 50.  A neutron is composed of two down quarks and one up quark. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 51.  A neutron is composed of two down quarks and one up quark. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 52.  A neutron is composed of two down quarks and one up quark. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 53.  A neutron is composed of two down quarks and one up quark. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 54.  A neutron is composed of two down quarks and one up quark. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 55.  A neutron is composed of two down quarks and one up quark. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 56. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 57. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 58. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 59. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 60. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 61. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 62. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I have two Up Quarks so I’m positive.”
  • 63. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Positive means Proton.”
  • 64. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 65. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I have two down Quarks.”
  • 66. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I have two down Quarks.” “I’m not negative however, just neutral.”
  • 67. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I’m also slightly larger than a Proton.”
  • 68. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 69. • Which is a Neutron, and which is a Proton? Neutron Proton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 70. • Which is a Meson, and which is a Baryon? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 71. • Which is a Meson, and which is a Baryon? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 72. • Which is a Meson, and which is a Baryon? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 73. • Which is a Meson, and which is a Baryon? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 74. • Which is a Meson, and which is a Baryon? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 75. • Which is a Meson, and which is a Baryon? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 76. • Which is a Meson, and which is a Baryon? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 77. • Which is a Meson, and which is a Baryon? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 78. • Which is a Neutron? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Send one volunteer up.
  • 79. • Answer! Two Down   Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 80. • One of the particles below is incorrect, which one is it? P N NN NP P P P N P P N Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 81. • Answer! It should be a Proton P N NN NP P P P N P P N Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 82. • Answer! It should be a Proton P N NN PP P P P N P P N Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 83. • Again! One of the particles below is incorrect, which one is it? P N NN PP P P P N P P P Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 84. • Again! One of the particles below is incorrect, which one is it? P N NN PP P P P N P P P Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 85. • Again! One of the particles below is incorrect, which one is it? P N NN PP P P P N P P N Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 86. • Again! One of the particles below is incorrect, which one is it? P N NP PP P P P N P P N Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 87. • Again! One of the particles below is incorrect, which one is it? P N NP PP P P P N P P N Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 88. • Again! One of the particles below is incorrect, which one is it? P N NN PP P P P N P P N Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 89. • Which particle is the Proton? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy A B C D
  • 90. • Which particle is the Proton? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy A B C D Letter D is the Proton
  • 91. • Which particle is the Proton? The Neutron is slightly larger than the Proton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy A B C D
  • 92. • Which particle is the Proton? The Neutron is slightly larger than the Proton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy A B C D
  • 93. • Which particle is the Neutron? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy B A C D
  • 94. • Which particle is the Neutron? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy B A C D Letter C is the Neutron
  • 95. • Which particle is the Neutron? – The Neutron is slightly larger than the Proton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy B A C D Letter C is the Neutron
  • 96. • What atom is this based only the quarks that you see? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 97. • Answer! Two Protons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 98. • Answer! Two Protons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 99. • Answer! Helium Atomic Number #2 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 100. • What atom is this based only the quarks that you see? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 101. • Answer! Beryllium Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 102. • Answer! Beryllium, Atomic Number 4,. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 103. • Answer! Beryllium, Atomic Number 4, Atomic Mass 9. 4 Protons, 5 Neutrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 104. • Answer! Beryllium, Atomic Number 4, Atomic Mass 9. 4 Protons, 5 Neutrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy P P P P
  • 105. • Answer! Beryllium, Atomic Number 4, Atomic Mass 9. 4 Protons, 5 Neutrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy P P P P N N N N N
  • 106. • Answer! Beryllium, Atomic Number 4, Atomic Mass 9. 4 Protons, 5 Neutrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy P P P P N N N N N Quarks. Learn more at http://physics.about.com/od/glossary/g/quark.htm
  • 107. • Video Link! • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LqeQo wRDzM&feature=related
  • 108. • How do we know so much about something so small? Anyone know what this is? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 109. • How do we know so much about something so small? Anyone know what this is? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Hoot” “Hoot” “That is one awesome particle accelerator / collider.”
  • 110. • How do we know so much about something so small? Anyone know what this is? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Hoot” “Hoot” “That is one awesome particle accelerator / collider.”
  • 111. 299,792,458 meters per second in a vacuum
  • 112. These patterns are read by computers and help scientists learn more about what particles are made of.
  • 113. These patterns are read by computers and help scientists learn more about what particles are made of. Particle Accelerators: Learn more at… http://science.howstuffworks.com/atom-smasher2.htm
  • 114. • Video Link! How the CERN Hadron Collidor works. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dw3KuNgD-jE
  • 115. • Video – Atoms, Quarks and technology. • Inside Quarks. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMgi2j9 Ks9k
  • 116.  Particle: A tiny piece of anything. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 117.  Particle: A tiny piece of anything.  An atom or nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 118.  Particle: A tiny piece of anything.  An atom or nucleus.  Elementary particle, quark, gluon. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 119.  Particle: A tiny piece of anything.  An atom or nucleus.  Elementary particle, quark, gluon. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 120. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 121. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 122. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 123. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 124. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 125. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 126. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 127. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 128. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All stable matter in the universe is made from particles that belong to the first generation.
  • 129. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Heavier Generation I, and Gen II particles quickly decay to the next most stable level.
  • 130. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 131. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “They were unstable anyways.”
  • 132. • The discovered quarks Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I thought they were strange and kind of charming.”
  • 133. “Oh No!”
  • 134. “Oh No!” “We are doing it again.”
  • 135. “Oh No!”
  • 136. “Oh No!” “We are doing it again.”
  • 137. • Video Link! Quark Song – Preview at 1:30 for language concern. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vsb2UKyxwQc Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 138. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 139. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 140. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 141. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 142. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 143. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 144. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 145. • Leptons? Which one do we know? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 146. • Leptons? Which one do we know? – Answer! The Electron Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 147. • Leptons? Which one do we know? – Which three have charges? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 148. • Leptons? Which one do we know? – Which three have charges? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 149. • Leptons? Which one do we know? – Which three have charges? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 150. • Leptons? Which one do we know? – Which three have charges? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 151. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 152. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Not found in ordinary matter, because they decay very rapidly into lighter, more stable leptons.
  • 153. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Not found in ordinary matter, because they decay very rapidly into lighter, more stable leptons.
  • 154. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Found in ordinary matter.
  • 155. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 156. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 157. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 158. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 159. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 160. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 161. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 162. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 163. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 164. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 165. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 166. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 167. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 168. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three.
  • 169. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 170. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 171. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 172. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 173. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 174. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 175. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 176. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 177. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 178. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 179. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 180. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy All of the leptons can be found alone unlike the quarks that are found in groups of two or three. Has a quark and anti quark
  • 181. “Oh No!”
  • 182. “Oh No!” “We have to do it again.”
  • 183. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 184. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 185. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 186. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 187. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 188. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 189. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 190. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 191. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 192. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 193. • Leptons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 194. • Which one has a charge? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 195. • Which one has a charge? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 196. • Which one has a charge? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 197. • Which one has a charge? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Leptons. Learn more at… http://hyperphysics.phy- astr.gsu.edu/hbase/particles/lepton.html`
  • 198. • Name that Elementary Particle Tic-Tac-Toe. • Class vs. the teacher. – Board on next slide. Teacher needs to minimize slideshow. – If you get the question right, you get that square. If you get it wrong the opponent gets it. – Each three in a row is 1 point. Most at end wins. – Students goes first. (X) Teacher next (O)
  • 199.  The 6 Leptons  Electron  Muon  Tau  3 types of Neutrinos Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 200.  The 6 Leptons  Electron  Muon  Tau  3 types of Neutrinos Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 201.  The 6 Leptons  Electron  Muon  Tau  3 types of Neutrinos Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 202.  The 6 Leptons  Electron  Muon  Tau  3 types of Neutrinos Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 203.  The 6 Leptons  Electron  Muon  Tau  3 types of Neutrinos Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 204.  The 6 Leptons  Electron  Muon  Tau  3 types of Neutrinos Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 205.  The 6 Leptons  Electron  Muon  Tau  3 types of Neutrinos Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 206. • The Neutrino Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 207. • The Neutrino – Neutrinos have no electrical or strong charge, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 208. • The Neutrino – Neutrinos have no electrical or strong charge, they almost never interact with any other particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 209. • The Neutrino – Neutrinos have no electrical or strong charge, they almost never interact with any other particles. • Most neutrinos pass right through the earth without ever interacting with a single atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 210. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 211. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 212. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 213. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 214. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 215. This is really difficult learning ahead and I’m going to try my best to learn it. I’m not going to give up. This is really difficult and I’m going to quit as soon as I don’t know it. I’m going to check out completely or create issues for those choosing A.
  • 216. • All visible matter in the universe is made from the first generation of matter particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 217. • All visible matter in the universe is made from the first generation of matter particles -- up quarks, down quarks, and electrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 218. • All visible matter in the universe is made from the first generation of matter particles -- up quarks, down quarks, and electrons. This is because all second and third generation particles are unstable and quickly decay into stable first generation particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 219. • What is this cake made of… – Sugar, flour, milk, eggs, water, baking soda, etc. – Molecules of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids. – Atoms of Sulfur, Phosphorus, Oxygen, Nitrogen, Carbon, Hydrogen, etc. – Protons, Neutrons, Electons – Quarks and Leptons and Force Carrier Particles. – ? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 220. • What is this cake made of… – Sugar, flour, milk, eggs, water, baking soda, etc. – Molecules of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids. – Atoms of Sulfur, Phosphorus, Oxygen, Nitrogen, Carbon, Hydrogen, etc. – Protons, Neutrons, Electons – Quarks and Leptons and Force Carrier Particles. – ? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 221. • What is this cake made of… – Sugar, flour, milk, eggs, water, baking soda, etc. – Molecules of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids. – Atoms of Sulfur, Phosphorus, Oxygen, Nitrogen, Carbon, Hydrogen, etc. – Protons, Neutrons, Electons – Quarks and Leptons and Force Carrier Particles. – ? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 222. • What is this cake made of… – Sugar, flour, milk, eggs, water, baking soda, etc. – Molecules of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids. – Atoms of Sulfur, Phosphorus, Oxygen, Nitrogen, Carbon, Hydrogen, etc. – Protons, Neutrons, Electons – Quarks and Leptons and Force Carrier Particles. – ? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 223. • What is this cake made of… – Sugar, flour, milk, eggs, water, baking soda, etc. – Molecules of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids. – Atoms of Sulfur, Phosphorus, Oxygen, Nitrogen, Carbon, Hydrogen, etc. – Protons, Neutrons, Electrons – Quarks and Leptons and Force Carrier Particles. – ? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 224. • What is this cake made of… – Sugar, flour, milk, eggs, water, baking soda, etc. – Molecules of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids. – Atoms of Sulfur, Phosphorus, Oxygen, Nitrogen, Carbon, Hydrogen, etc. – Protons, Neutrons, Electrons – Quarks and Leptons and Force Carrier Particles. – ? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 225. • What is this cake made of… – Sugar, flour, milk, eggs, water, baking soda, etc. – Molecules of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids. – Atoms of Sulfur, Phosphorus, Oxygen, Nitrogen, Carbon, Hydrogen, etc. – Protons, Neutrons, Electrons – Quarks and Leptons and Force Carrier Particles. – ? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 226. • The recipe of the Universe: – “What everything is made of” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 227.  Everything is made of… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 228.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 229.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 230.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 231.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 232.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Fermion: Any particle that has an odd half- integer (like 1/2, 3/2, and so forth) spin. Quarks and leptons, as well as most composite particles, like protons and neutrons, are fermions.
  • 233.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Fermions cannot exist together. They cannot occupy the same quantum state. Known as the Pauli Exclusion Principle.
  • 234.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron.  Force carrier particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 235.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron.  Force carrier particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The ways that elementary particles interact with one another.
  • 236. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth.
  • 237. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth.
  • 238. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth.
  • 239. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth.
  • 240. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth.
  • 241. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth.
  • 242. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth.
  • 243. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other.
  • 244. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other. – The skaters would be the quarks and leptons and the ball would be the force carrier particles.
  • 245. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other. – The skaters would be the quarks and leptons and the ball would be the force carrier particles.
  • 246. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other. – The skaters would be the quarks and leptons and the ball would be the force carrier particles. Quarks and Leptons
  • 247. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other. – The skaters would be the quarks and leptons and the ball would be the force carrier particles. Quarks and Leptons They interact by exchanging Bosons
  • 248. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other. – The skaters would be the quarks and leptons and the ball would be the force carrier particles. Quarks and Leptons They interact by exchanging Bosons
  • 249. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other. – The skaters would be the quarks and leptons and the ball would be the force carrier particles. Quarks and Leptons They interact by exchanging Bosons
  • 250. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other. – The skaters would be the quarks and leptons and the ball would be the force carrier particles. Quarks and Leptons They interact by exchanging Bosons
  • 251. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other. – The skaters would be the quarks and leptons and the ball would be the force carrier particles. Quarks and Leptons They interact by exchanging Bosons
  • 252. • Example: Think of two people on roller skates passing a ball back and forth. – As they toss the ball they are pushed away from each other. – The skaters would be the quarks and leptons and the ball would be the force carrier particles. Quarks and Leptons They interact by exchanging Bosons
  • 253. • An analogy for behavior of fermions (matter) and bosons (photon)
  • 254. • An analogy for behavior of fermions (matter) and bosons (photon)
  • 255. • An analogy for behavior of fermions (matter) and bosons (photon)
  • 256.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron.  Force carrier particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 257.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron.  Force carrier particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy These particles are thought to be exchanged when forces occur. Bosons are particles which have an integer spin (0, 1, 2...). All the force carrier particles are bosons
  • 258.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron.  Force carrier particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 259.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron.  Force carrier particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 260.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron.  Force carrier particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 261.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron.  Force carrier particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 262.  Everything is made of…  6 quarks that make Protons and Neutrons  6 leptons. The best-known lepton is the electron.  Force carrier particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 263.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 264.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 265.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 266.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 267.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 268.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The natural phenomenon by which physical bodies appear to attract each other with a force proportional to their masses. Weakest force but has an infinite range.
  • 269.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The forces that occur between electrically charged particles. In electromagnetic theory these forces are explained using electromagnetic fields. Much stronger than gravity and has an infinite range. The natural phenomenon by which physical bodies appear to attract each other with a force proportional to their masses. Weakest force but has an infinite range.
  • 270.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy A force between elementary particles that causes certain processes that take place with low probability, as radioactive beta- decay and collisions between neutrinos and other particles. Short range and only dominate only on sub atomic particles . The forces that occur between electrically charged particles. In electromagnetic theory these forces are explained using electromagnetic fields. Much stronger than gravity and has an infinite range. The natural phenomenon by which physical bodies appear to attract each other with a force proportional to their masses. Weakest force but has an infinite range.
  • 271.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy A force between elementary particles that causes certain processes that take place with low probability, as radioactive beta- decay and collisions between neutrinos and other particles. Short range and only dominate only on sub atomic particles . The forces that occur between electrically charged particles. In electromagnetic theory these forces are explained using electromagnetic fields. Much stronger than gravity and has an infinite range. The natural phenomenon by which physical bodies appear to attract each other with a force proportional to their masses. Weakest force but has an infinite range. Weak Force: Weakest of the forces but still stronger than gravity.
  • 272.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This force is responsible for the binding together of nucleons and controls their stability, it is known as the strong nuclear force. The strongest force. A force between elementary particles that causes certain processes that take place with low probability, as radioactive beta- decay and collisions between neutrinos and other particles. Short range and only dominate only on sub atomic particles . The forces that occur between electrically charged particles. In electromagnetic theory these forces are explained using electromagnetic fields. Much stronger than gravity and has an infinite range. The natural phenomenon by which physical bodies appear to attract each other with a force proportional to their masses. Weakest force but has an infinite range. Weak Force: Weakest of the forces but still stronger than gravity.
  • 273.  The four force carrier particles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This force is responsible for the binding together of nucleons and controls their stability, it is known as the strong nuclear force. The strongest force. A force between elementary particles that causes certain processes that take place with low probability, as radioactive beta- decay and collisions between neutrinos and other particles. Short range and only dominate only on sub atomic particles . The forces that occur between electrically charged particles. In electromagnetic theory these forces are explained using electromagnetic fields. Much stronger than gravity and has an infinite range. The natural phenomenon by which physical bodies appear to attract each other with a force proportional to their masses. Weakest force but has an infinite range. Weak Force: Weakest of the forces but still stronger than gravity. Learn more. http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/science/standardmodel-en.html
  • 274. • Matter particles transfer discrete amounts of energy by exchanging bosons with each other.
  • 275. • Matter particles transfer discrete amounts of energy by exchanging bosons with each other. – Each fundamental force has its own corresponding boson particle.
  • 276. • Matter particles transfer discrete amounts of energy by exchanging bosons with each other. – Each fundamental force has its own corresponding boson particle. • Strong Force „gluon‟
  • 277. • Matter particles transfer discrete amounts of energy by exchanging bosons with each other. – Each fundamental force has its own corresponding boson particle. • Strong Force „gluon‟ • Weak „W and Z bosons‟
  • 278. • Matter particles transfer discrete amounts of energy by exchanging bosons with each other. – Each fundamental force has its own corresponding boson particle. • Strong Force „gluon‟ • Weak „W and Z bosons‟ • Electromagnetic Force „photon‟
  • 279. • Matter particles transfer discrete amounts of energy by exchanging bosons with each other. – Each fundamental force has its own corresponding boson particle. • Strong Force „gluon‟ • Weak „W and Z bosons‟ • Electromagnetic Force „photon‟ • Gravity „graviton‟ not found yet
  • 280. • Matter particles transfer discrete amounts of energy by exchanging bosons with each other. – Each fundamental force has its own corresponding boson particle. • Strong Force „gluon‟ • Weak „W and Z bosons‟ • Electromagnetic Force „photon‟ • Gravity „graviton‟ not found yet
  • 281. • Matter particles transfer discrete amounts of energy by exchanging bosons with each other. – Each fundamental force has its own corresponding boson particle. • Strong Force „gluon‟ • Weak „W and Z bosons‟ • Electromagnetic Force „photon‟ • Gravity „graviton‟ not found yet
  • 282. • Matter particles transfer discrete amounts of energy by exchanging bosons with each other. – Each fundamental force has its own corresponding boson particle. • Strong Force „gluon‟ • Weak „W and Z bosons‟ • Electromagnetic Force „photon‟ • Gravity „graviton‟ not found yet
  • 283. Up Down Charm Strange Top Bottom Electron Neutrino Electron Muon Neutrino Muon Tau Neutrino tau Photon Z Boson W Boson Gluon EM Weak Weak Strong
  • 284. • Which of the four below are you most familiar with?
  • 285. • Which of the four below are you most familiar with?
  • 286. • Which of the four below are you most familiar with? Gravity is not a part of the Standard Model. It doesn’t fit in very well. It works right now b/c gravity is a very weak force and has negligible effects on very small particles.
  • 287. • Which of the four below are you most familiar with? Gravity is not a part of the Standard Model. It doesn’t fit in very well. It works right now b/c gravity is a very weak force and has negligible effects on very small particles.
  • 288. • Which of the four below are you most familiar with? Gravity is not a part of the Standard Model. It doesn’t fit in very well. It works right now b/c gravity is a very weak force and has negligible effects on very small particles. When matter is in large amounts the effects of gravity are large.
  • 289. “Oh No!”
  • 290. “Oh No!” “We have to do it again.”
  • 291. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 292. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 293. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 294. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 295. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 296. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 297. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 298. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 299. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 300. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 301. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 302. “Oh No!”
  • 303. “Oh No!” “We have to do it again.”
  • 304. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 305. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 306. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 307. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 308. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 309. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 310. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 311. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 312. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 313. • Name the Force Carrier Particle.
  • 314. “Oh No!”
  • 315. “Oh No!” “We need strong force to help him.”
  • 316. • Video Link! Quark Song Again. – Preview at 1:30 for language concern. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vsb2UKyxwQc Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 317. • Video Link! Hank explains Electromagnetism. The four fundamental forces. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy6kba3A8vY
  • 318. • Video Link! Hank explains Strong Force. The four fundamental forces. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yv3EMq2Dgq8
  • 319. • Video Link! Hank explains Weak Force. The four fundamental forces. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnL_nwmCLpY
  • 320. • Video Link! Hank explains Gravitation. The four fundamental forces. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhG_ArxmwRM
  • 321. • We can move on if… • Which letter below represents the force carrier particles?
  • 322. • We can move on if… • Which letter below represents the force carrier particles? • A.) Photon, Quark, Proton, Neutron
  • 323. • We can move on if… • Which letter below represents the force carrier particles? • A.) Photon, Quark, Proton, Neutron • B.) Electron, Strong Force, Weak Force, Quark
  • 324. • We can move on if… • Which letter below represents the force carrier particles? • A.) Photon, Quark, Proton, Neutron • B.) Electron, Strong Force, Weak Force, Quark • C.) Strong Force, Weak Force, EM, Gravity
  • 325. • We can move on if… • Which letter below represents the force carrier particles? • A.) Photon, Quark, Proton, Neutron • B.) Electron, Strong Force, Weak Force, Quark • C.) Strong Force, Weak Force, EM, Gravity • D.) Gravity, Proton, Electron, Neutron
  • 326. • We can move on if… • Which letter below represents the force carrier particles? • A.) Photon, Quark, Proton, Neutron • B.) Electron, Strong Force, Weak Force, Quark • C.) Strong Force, Weak Force, EM, Gravity • D.) Gravity, Proton, Electron, Neutron
  • 327. • We can move on if… • Which letter below represents the force carrier particles? • A.) Photon, Quark, Proton, Neutron • B.) Electron, Strong Force, Weak Force, Quark • C.) Strong Force, Weak Force, EM, Gravity • D.) Gravity, Proton, Electron, Neutron It’s over? There’s so much more to learn. I can’t believe the teacher is moving on…
  • 328. • We can move on if… • Which letter below represents the force carrier particles. • A.) Photon, Quark, Proton, Neutron • B.) Electron, Strong Force, Weak Force, Quark • C.) Strong Force, Weak Force, EM, Gravity • D.) Gravity, Proton, Electron, Neutron It’s over? There’s so much more to learn. I can’t believe the teacher is moving on…
  • 329. • Nuclear Energy: The energy that deals with the changes in the nucleus of an atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 330. • Nuclear Energy: The energy that deals with the changes in the nucleus of an atom. – Nuclear energy is produced when the nuclei of two atoms join together (fusion) or when the nucleus of an atom splits apart (fission). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 331. • Nuclear Energy: The energy that deals with the changes in the nucleus of an atom. – Nuclear energy is produced when the nuclei of two atoms join together (fusion) or when the nucleus of an atom splits apart (fission). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 332. • Fusion – Nuclei join together • Fission – Nuclei break apart – Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 333. • Fusion – Nuclei join together • Fission – Nuclei break apart – Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 334. • Fusion – Nuclei join together • Fission – Nuclei break apart – Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 335. • Fusion – Nuclei join together • Fission – Nuclei break apart – Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 336. • Fusion – Nuclei join together • Fission – Nuclei break apart – Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 337. • Fusion – Nuclei join together • Fission – Nuclei break apart – Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 338. • Fusion – Nuclei join together • Fission – Nuclei break apart – Particles are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 339. Nuclear Fusion. Learn more at http://www.atomicarchive.com/ Fusion/Fusion1.shtml
  • 340. Nuclear Fission. Learn more at… http://library.thinkquest.org/17940/text s/fission/fission.html
  • 341. • Which is Fusion? Which is Fission? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 342. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 343. • Fission Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 344. • Fission Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 345. • Fission Fusion Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 346. • Try and be the first to figure out the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know, you only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 347. • Try and be the first to figure out the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know, you only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 348. • Try Again! Be the first to figure out the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know, you only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 349. • Try Again! Be the first to figure out the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know, you only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 350. “Oh No!”
  • 351. “I think Part II is Over.”
  • 352. Part III better have some answers because that was crazy stuff?
  • 353. • You should be close to page 3 of your bundle.
  • 354. • You should be close to page 3 of your bundle.
  • 355. • Video Link! Standard Model Particle Physics. – The first three minutes will be a nice review. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xnsMGNicho
  • 356. • Video Link! The Standard Model Particle Physics – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0KjXsGRvoA
  • 357. • Intro to the atom review game.
  • 358. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tst Please visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet
  • 359. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to and NSTA) • http://www.sciencedaily.com/ • http://www.sciencemag.org/ • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
  • 360. • Dark Matter, Dark Energy, General Relativity, Special Relativity, and String Theory Optional PowerPoint. – Introductory and will generate many questions and hopefully some answers. – Available in activities folder. (Optional)
  • 361. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  • 362. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Areas of Focus within The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit: Atoms (Atomic Force Microscopes), Rutherford‟s Gold Foil Experiment, Cathode Tube, Atoms, Fundamental Particles, The Nucleus, Isotopes, AMU, Size of Atoms and Particles, Quarks, Recipe of the Universe, Atomic Theory, Atomic Symbols, #‟;s, Valence Electrons, Octet Rule, SPONCH Atoms, Molecules, Hydrocarbons (Structure), Alcohols (Structure), Proteins (Structure), Atomic Bonds, Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Metallic Bonds, , Precipitation Reactions, Acids and Bases, Electron Negativity, Polar Bonds, Chemical Change, Exothermic Reactions, Endothermic Reactions, Laws Conservation of Matter, Balancing Chemical Equations, Oxidation and Reduction, Periodic Table of the Elements, Organization of Periodic Table, Transition Metals, Acids and Bases, Non-Metals, Metals, Metalloids, Ionization.
  • 363. • This PowerPoint roadmap is one small part of my Atoms and Periodic Table Unit. • This unit includes a four part 2000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap. • 13 page bundled homework that chronologically follows slideshow • 14 pages of unit notes with visuals. • 3 PowerPoint review games. • Activity sheets, rubrics, advice page, curriculum guide, materials list, and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  • 364. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  • 365. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  • 366. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  • 367. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com