Animal Symbiosis Lesson PowerPoint, Parasitism, Mutualism, Commensalism

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This PowerPoint was one very small part of my Ecology Interactions Unit from the website http://sciencepowerpoint.com/index.html .This unit includes a 3 part 2000+ Slide PowerPoint loaded with activities, project ideas, critical class notes (red slides), review opportunities, challenge questions with answers, 3 PowerPoint review games (125 slides each) and much more. A bundled homework package and detailed unit notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow.
Areas of Focus within The Ecology Interactions Unit: Levels of Biological Organization (Ecology), Parts of the Biosphere, Habitat, Ecological Niche, Types of Competition, Competitive Exclusion Theory, Animal Interactions, Food Webs, Predator Prey Relationships, Camouflage, Population Sampling, Abundance, Relative Abundance, Diversity, Mimicry, Batesian Mimicry, Mullerian Mimicry, Symbiosis, Parasitism, Mutualism, Commensalism, Plant and Animal Interactions, Coevolution, Animal Strategies to Eat Plants, Plant Defense Mechanisms, Exotic Species, Impacts of Invasive Exotic Species.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thank you again and best wishes.

Sincerely,
Ryan Murphy M.Ed
www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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Animal Symbiosis Lesson PowerPoint, Parasitism, Mutualism, Commensalism

  1. 1. • Dispersive mutualisms: One species receives food in exchange for moving the pollen or seeds of its partner. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Please make notes legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Individual Population Community Ecosystem Biome Biosphere
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5.  New Area of Focus: Special Feeding Relationships Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  6. 6.  Symbiosis: A long term relationship between two or more different species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7.  Symbiosis: A long term relationship between two or more different species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8.  Three types of symbiosis  - Parasitism  - Mutualism  - Commensalism Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9.  Three types of symbiosis  - Parasitism  - Mutualism  - Commensalism Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10.  Three types of symbiosis  - Parasitism  - Mutualism  - Commensalism Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11.  Three types of symbiosis  - Parasitism  - Mutualism  - Commensalism Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12.  Parasitism: One organism benefits while the other is harmed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13.  Parasitism: One organism benefits while the other is harmed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. “I’m sick of studying dumb stuff” “Why should I care about studying parasites?”
  15. 15. • 1 in 3 American suffers in some form from a parasite. – Learn about them to help yourself. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. “I’m sorry that I yelled earlier.” “I didn’t know that.”
  17. 17. • Caution! Disgusting parasites ahead. – Be prepared to be grossed out. Close your eyes if needed.
  18. 18. • Caution! Disgusting parasites ahead. – Be prepared to be grossed out. Close your eyes if needed.
  19. 19. • Caution! Disgusting parasites ahead. – Be prepared to be grossed out. Close your eyes if needed.
  20. 20. • Parasites are one on the most numerous and successful groups of organisms on the planet. – For every species on earth, they may host a handful of unique parasites. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Most parasites have very complicated life cycles, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. • Most parasites have very complicated life cycles, often going through a number of different species before finding a host. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23. • Most parasites have very complicated life cycles, often going through a number of different species before finding a host. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24. • Most parasites have very complicated life cycles, often going through a number of different species before finding a host. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. • Most parasites have very complicated life cycles, often going through a number of different species before finding a host. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26. • Most parasites have very complicated life cycles, often going through a number of different species before finding a host. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27. • Most parasites have very complicated life cycles, often going through a number of different species before finding a host. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • Parasites damage their host by consuming tissues, and releasing toxins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • Two general types of parasites Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  30. 30. • Two general types of parasites –Endoparasites: Inside your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31. • Two general types of parasites –Endoparasites: Inside your body. –Ectoparasites: Outside your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32. • Two general types of parasites –Endoparasites: Inside your body. –Ectoparasites: Outside your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  33. 33. • Two general types of parasites –Endoparasites: Inside your body. –Ectoparasites: Outside your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  34. 34. • Two general types of parasites –Endoparasites: Inside your body. –Ectoparasites: Outside your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35. • Two general types of parasites –Endoparasites: Inside your body. –Ectoparasites: Outside your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. • Worms make up some of the common parasites that affects humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37. • Worms make up some of the common parasites that affects humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • Worms make up some of the common parasites that affects humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Worms make up some of the common parasites that affects humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • Ascaris Infection “Worm Ball” – Removed from 10 year old boy.
  41. 41. • Human Intestine post surgery. – This section of the intestine was removed as the worms created a blockage.
  42. 42. • Human Intestine post surgery. – This section of the intestine was removed as the worms created a blockage. “I’m a parasitic worm, I have one mission…
  43. 43. • Human Intestine post surgery. – This section of the intestine was removed as the worms created a blockage. “I’m a parasitic worm, I have one mission… Don’t Die and make lots of babies…”
  44. 44. • A few endoparasites that affect humans. – Tape worms
  45. 45. • If a child frequently itches their butt, you should check to see if they have contracted pinworm.
  46. 46. • Pinworm
  47. 47. • Pinworm: Medication works, but a flashlight and small spoon is also required.
  48. 48. • Pinworm: Medication works, but a flashlight and small spoon is also required. Pinworms
  49. 49. • Pinworm: Medication works, but a flashlight and small spoon is also required. Pinworms Anus
  50. 50. “Yummy!” “These Pinworm eggs taste great when I bite my nails.”
  51. 51. • Hookworm
  52. 52. • Ringworm
  53. 53. • Ringworm
  54. 54. • Athlete’s Foot: Another Fungi
  55. 55. • Roundworms
  56. 56. • Guinea worms
  57. 57. • Guinea worms can be very large.
  58. 58. • Loa loa, eyeworms
  59. 59. • Loa loa, eyeworms
  60. 60. • Onchocerciasis, Riverblindness
  61. 61. • Screw worm fly.
  62. 62. • Screw worm fly.
  63. 63. • Brain Worm – Affects Moose. Slime from snail passes the parasite between species.
  64. 64. • Heartworms – Dogs – Common parasite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Heartworms – Dogs – Common parasite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about heartworm prevention at… http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/heartworm-dogs-symptoms- tests
  66. 66. • Some common ectoparasites. – Fleas
  67. 67. • Louse
  68. 68. • Chiggers
  69. 69. • Ticks
  70. 70. • Crabs (louse)
  71. 71. • Crabs (louse)
  72. 72. • Crab (louse) legs and claws are highly adapted to cling to pubic hairs on the human body.
  73. 73. “Ahhh, good job little baby crab.”
  74. 74. “Your almost there.” “Just keep climbing up the pubic hair.”
  75. 75. • Bed bugs
  76. 76. • This strange louse is a tongue eating parasite that lives in a fishes mouth.
  77. 77. • This strange louse is a tongue eating parasite that lives in a fishes mouth.
  78. 78. • Mange Parasite.
  79. 79. • Biting flies
  80. 80. • Human Bot Fly.
  81. 81. • Human Bot Fly
  82. 82. • Human Bot Fly
  83. 83. • Sand Fly
  84. 84. • Filariasis
  85. 85. • Filariasis
  86. 86. • Brain eating amoeba
  87. 87. • Zombie Snail – Parasitic flatworm – Eggs exist in bird droppings, and when snail eats droppings, the parasite crawls into eyestalk and pulse. – A bird comes by and eats eye stalk / parasite and snail loses eye.
  88. 88. • Zombie Snail – Caused by parasitic flatworm – Eggs exist in bird droppings, and when snail eats droppings, the parasite crawls into eyestalk and begins to pulse. (Caterpillar?) – A bird comes by and eats eye stalk / parasite and snail loses eye.
  89. 89. • Zombie Snail – Caused by parasitic flatworm – Eggs exist in bird droppings, and when snail eats droppings, the parasite crawls into eyestalk and begins to pulse. (Caterpillar?) – A bird comes by and eats eye stalk / parasite and snail loses eye.
  90. 90. • Video Link! Optional, Zombie Snail – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Go_LIz7kTok
  91. 91. • Video – Wasp parasite and aphids – Are all parasites bad to humans? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLtUk- W5Gpk
  92. 92. • Mosquito – A parasite that carries the malaria parasite.
  93. 93. • Mosquito – A parasite that carries the malaria parasite. Malaria kills about 1.2 million people every year… Learn more about malaria at… http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/biology/mosquitoes/
  94. 94. • Leeches
  95. 95. • Vampire Bat.
  96. 96. • Sea Lamprey
  97. 97. • Article! Sea Lamprey – Read Article and answer the questions at the bottom in your journal.
  98. 98. • Sea Lamprey are jawless fish (very old), They attach to fish with sucker and bore a hole into flesh with tongue. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  99. 99. • Coming to your local swim hole soon.
  100. 100. • The parasite must not kill the host. The host provides the food and shelter and survival of the parasite.
  101. 101. • Video Links! (Optional) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-KJZ22- wTQ
  102. 102. • The Candiru or toothpick fish…
  103. 103. • Video Link! The Candiru – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQWgUht- ObI
  104. 104. • The Candiru or toothpick fish sucks blood and can enter any open human orifice.
  105. 105. • The Candiru or toothpick fish sucks blood and can enter any open human orifice.
  106. 106. • The Candiru or toothpick fish sucks blood and can enter any open human orifice.
  107. 107. • The Candiru or toothpick fish sucks blood and can enter any open human orifice.
  108. 108. • Most parasites have degenerated in some way, that is, they have lost many physical features such as eyes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109. • Most parasites have degenerated in some way, that is, they have lost many physical features such as eyes. – They don’t need these complicated things anymore, but they have added features such as producing more eggs and finding ways to exist undetected. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. • Brood Parasitism – Cowbird
  111. 111. • Brood Parasitism – The cowbird waits until a mother leaves a nest and then lays her eggs next to the other egg. When the bird comes back she doesn’t know the difference and raises the eggs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112. • Brood Parasitism – The cowbird waits until a mother leaves a nest and then lays her eggs next to the other egg. When the bird comes back she doesn’t know the difference and raises the eggs. – The cowbird drops a few of the real mothers eggs out to make room. Those eggs die and the juvenile cowbird takes most of the food while the other chicks starve. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  113. 113. • Which chick below is an example of brood parasitism?
  114. 114. • Which chick below is an example of brood parasitism?
  115. 115. • Which chick below is an example of brood parasitism?
  116. 116. • Which eggs are examples of brood parasitism?
  117. 117. • Which eggs are examples of brood parasitism?
  118. 118. • Which eggs are examples of brood parasitism?
  119. 119. • Plants are parasitized by viruses, bacteria, fungi, nematodes, and a few other plants.
  120. 120. Mistletoe is a common plant parasite
  121. 121. Learn more advanced article on parasitism at… http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/ecologica l-consequences-of-parasitism-13255694 Parasite of the day found at… http://dailyparasite.blogspot.com/
  122. 122. • Video Link (Optional) Parasites with Hank. • Please preview for language. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABeBqbBy2Lo
  123. 123. • Some PowerPoint advice! – Involve people. I need two volunteers, one boy and one girl to read the next slide. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124. PowerPoint advice: You should…
  125. 125. PowerPoint advice: You should… KISS Or you can read the next slide…?
  126. 126. • PowerPoint advice: “KISS” –Keep –It –Simple –Silly Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  127. 127. • PowerPoint advice: “KISS” –Keep –It –Simple –Silly Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  128. 128. • PowerPoint advice: “KISS” –Keep –It –Simple –Silly Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  129. 129. • PowerPoint advice: “KISS” –Keep –It –Simple –Silly Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  130. 130. • PowerPoint advice: “KISS” –Keep –It –Simple –Silly Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  131. 131. • PowerPoint Advice: – Cheesy Effects do not help your presentation. – Waiting for information is a waste of time. – Animations can take away from your presentation. – Wait! I’m not finished reading this. Where is it going? I’m not ready yet! “Arrrgh, I hate animations!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  132. 132. • Sound effects combined with effects is even worse.
  133. 133. How is this color combination? Do you want to sit through 25 slides of Twinkie Yellow? Be smart about your color choice. “Keep it Simple” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  134. 134. Is this Font to Big? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  135. 135. Tornado Formation – A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth. Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph. – Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in width. – Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm, and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft. – Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable. An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with height. – Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a clockwise, or veering, direction. – Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level as the only indication of the tornado's presence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136. Tornado Formation – A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth. Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph. – Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in width. – Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm, and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft. – Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable. An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with height. – Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a clockwise, or veering, direction. – Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level as the only indication of the tornado's presence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Some PowerPoint advice!
  137. 137. Tornado Formation – A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth. Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph. – Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in width. – Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm, and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft. – Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable. An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with height. – Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a clockwise, or veering, direction. – Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level as the only indication of the tornado's presence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Some PowerPoint advice! Only a few words per slide.
  138. 138. Tornado Formation – A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth. Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph. – Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in width. – Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm, and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft. – Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable. An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with height. – Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a clockwise, or veering, direction. – Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level as the only indication of the tornado's presence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Some PowerPoint advice! Only a few words per slide. NO Paragraphs! NO Reading!
  139. 139. Tornado Formation – A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth. Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph. – Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in width. – Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm, and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft. – Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable. An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with height. – Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a clockwise, or veering, direction. – Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level as the only indication of the tornado's presence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Some PowerPoint advice! Only a few words per slide. NO Paragraphs! NO Reading! NO Copy and Paste.
  140. 140. Tornado Formation – A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth. Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph. – Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in width. – Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm, and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft. – Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable. An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with height. – Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a clockwise, or veering, direction. – Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level as the only indication of the tornado's presence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Some PowerPoint advice! Only a few words per slide. NO Paragraphs! NO Reading! NO Copy and Paste. It’s cheating and boring.
  141. 141. • Some PowerPoint advice – Visuals are more important than words. – This is a picture of a tornado forming. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  142. 142. • Some PowerPoint advice – Visuals are more important than words. – This is a picture of a tornado forming. Note – Cyclonic formation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143. • Some PowerPoint advice – Visuals are more important than words. – This is a picture of a tornado forming. Note – Cyclonic formation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. • The requirements of this project in in 10 seconds. – Don’t make your presentation PowerPointless. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145. • Activity! Creating a PowerPoint Presentation on parasites. • Fact sheet in activities folder – Visit the cdc website to find A-Z list of parasites and choose one of interest (10 minutes something that interests you) • http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/ – 1 Slide Title Page: Common and science name of parasite. – 2/3 slides: Pictures of parasite / host – 2/3 slides: How do you get it / transmitted? – 3 slides: How it effects it’s host (health effects)? – 1 slide: How do you treat this parasite? – 1 Slide: What’s the life cycle of this parasite? – Works cited page optional but encouraged, use APA format. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  146. 146. Activity Sheet! Parasite Research Sheet - Found in activities folder.
  147. 147. • Scabies (Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148. • Scabies is spread from person to person contact Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  149. 149. • People don’t usually have symptoms during the first 2 to 6 weeks they are infested (CDC, 2010). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  150. 150. • The scabies mite can be spread during this time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  151. 151. • The microscopic scabies mite burrows into the upper layer of the skin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  152. 152. • The microscopic scabies mite burrows into the upper layer of the skin. (CDC, 2010). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Lays Eggs in Skin
  153. 153. • Picture of rash caused by the burrowing scabies mite. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154. • The rashes and infections can be minor, • Or the they can very serious. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155. • The rashes and infections can be minor, • Or the they can very serious. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Scabies occurs worldwide and can infect anyone. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • Picture of scabies mite infecting homeless in Norway. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158. • Scabies life cycle goes from egg to nymph to adult. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159. • Scabicides are used to kill scabies and eggs. – Doctor’s prescription is needed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160. • Learn more at…http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/
  161. 161. • Works Cited • Centers For Disease Control. (2010, November 2). Parasites - scabies. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/scabies/in dex.html
  162. 162. • Information to complete works cited page can be found at… • http://citationmachine.net/index2.php
  163. 163. • Activity! Creating a PowerPoint Presentation on parasites. • Fact sheet in activities folder – Visit the cdc website to find A-Z list of parasites and choose one of interest (10 minutes) • http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/ – 1 Slide Title Page: Common and science name of parasite. – 2/3 slides: Pictures of parasite / host – 2/3 slides: How do you get it / transmitted? – 3 slides: How it effects it’s host (health effects)? – 1 slide: How do you treat this parasite? – 1 Slide: What’s the life cycle of this parasite? – Works cited page optional but encouraged, use APA format. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164. • Video Link! How to make a PowerPoint. – Note: This video is also a good example of an extremely boring and ineffective PowerPoint. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUqIDs5MZxM Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  165. 165. • Parasite Presentations. – Each person should set-up their presentation area so it’s nice and neat. – Students should record information about parasites directly to their homework bundle as you move from presentation to presentation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166. • The Parasite Zone. Creepy music to play during the roaming presentations. – Twilight Zone Intro: 30 Sec. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxf_Dvy0VLs – Dark Ambient: 7 minutes. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1vjTJTRn48 • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJyiTDAWzDA&feat ure=related Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167. • You can now complete this question in your bundled homework package.
  168. 168. • You can now complete this question in your bundled homework package.
  169. 169. • Coevolution: The evolution of two or more species, each adapting to changes in the other.
  170. 170. • Coevolution: The evolution of two or more species, each adapting to changes in the other.
  171. 171. • These ecological relationships include:
  172. 172. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host
  173. 173. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host – Competitive species
  174. 174. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host – Competitive species – Mutualistic species
  175. 175. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host – Competitive species – Mutualistic species
  176. 176. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host – Competitive species – Mutualistic species
  177. 177. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host – Competitive species – Mutualistic species
  178. 178. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host – Competitive species – Mutualistic species
  179. 179. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host – Competitive species – Mutualistic species
  180. 180. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host – Competitive species – Mutualistic species
  181. 181. • These ecological relationships include: – Predator/prey and parasite/host – Competitive species – Mutualistic species
  182. 182. • Video Link Coevolution and a nice review of other forms of evolution. – (Advanced / Optional) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDVbt2qQRq s&feature=results_video&playnext=1&list=PL7A 750281106CD067
  183. 183.  Mutualism: Both organisms benefit. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184.  Types of mutualisms Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • Look how the majority of the this plants roots are connected to the symbiotic fungi. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. • Fungus breaks down organic molecules and helps return those nutrients to plants. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  188. 188. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  189. 189. • Which plant has helpful Mycorrhizae fungi in the soil providing nutrients to the plant? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190. • The fungi will help the plant absorb valuable nutrients so the plant can grow? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  193. 193. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy They look for molecules to break down.
  198. 198. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy They look for molecules to break down.
  199. 199. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy They look for molecules to break down.
  200. 200. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy They look for molecules to break down.
  201. 201. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy They look for molecules to break down.
  202. 202. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy They look for molecules to break down.
  203. 203. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy They look for molecules to break down.
  204. 204. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  205. 205. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. Leaf cutter ants feed leaves to their fungus colonies.
  208. 208. Leaf cutter ants feed leaves to their fungus colonies. -The ants then feed on the growing fungus.
  209. 209. Leaf cutter ants feed leaves to their fungus colonies. -The ants then feed on the growing fungus.
  210. 210. • There were all examples of trophic Mutualisms
  211. 211.  Trophic mutualism: Both species help feed each other.  -
  212. 212.  Trophic mutualism: Both species help feed each other.  Usually nutrient related.
  213. 213.  Cleaning symbiosis: One species gets food and shelter, the other has parasites removed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  214. 214.  Cleaning symbiosis: One species gets food and shelter, the other has parasites removed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  215. 215. • Video Link! Bulldozer Shrimp and the Goby. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vR9X3gFT pL0&feature=related
  216. 216. • Video! Goby Fish and Bulldozer Shrimp. – How is this a defensive mutualism? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vR9X3gFT pL0&feature=fvwrel
  217. 217. • Video Link! Review of Symbiosis – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSmL2F1t81Q
  218. 218. • Question! Are these ants killing this caterpillar? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  219. 219. • Question! Are these ants killing this caterpillar? – Answer: No. they are eating some sugary secretions releases by the caterpillar. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  220. 220. • Video! Caterpillar and Ant defensive mutualism. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3bWqlPLpMg
  221. 221.  Defensive mutualisms: One species protects the other and gets some benefits for its help. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. • Never climb Acacia trees that have these galls. Viscous ants feel the vibrations and coming running out to attack. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  223. 223. • Never climb Acacia trees that have these galls. Viscous ants feel the vibrations and coming running out to attack. – They get drops of sugar from the leaves of the tree. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  224. 224. • Never climb Acacia trees that have these galls. Viscous ants feel the vibrations and coming running out to attack. – They get drops of sugar from the leaves of the tree. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  225. 225. • Video Link (Optional) Ants and defensive mutualisms. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xm2qdxVV Rm4
  226. 226. • The Sea Anemome and the Clownfish are a mutualism.
  227. 227. • The Sea Anemome and the Clownfish are a mutualism. – The Anemome gets small scrapes from the clownfish, and the Clownfish gets protection.
  228. 228.  Dispersive mutualisms: One species receives food in exchange for moving the pollen or seeds of its partner. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  229. 229.  Dispersive mutualisms: One species receives food in exchange for moving the pollen or seeds of its partner. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  230. 230.  Dispersive mutualisms: One species receives food in exchange for moving the pollen or seeds of its partner. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  231. 231.  Dispersive mutualisms: One species receives food in exchange for moving the pollen or seeds of its partner. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  232. 232.  Dispersive mutualisms: One species receives food in exchange for moving the pollen or seeds of its partner. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  233. 233.  Dispersive mutualisms: One species receives food in exchange for moving the pollen or seeds of its partner. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  234. 234.  Dispersive mutualisms: One species receives food in exchange for moving the pollen or seeds of its partner. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about plant animal mutualisms at… https://www.boundless.com/biology/flowering- plants/mutualistic-interaction-between-plants-and- animals/mutualistic-interactions-between-plants-and- animals/
  235. 235. • Pollination – Insects transfer pollen from one flower to the next, insects gets nectar.
  236. 236. • Pollination – Insects transfer pollen from one flower to the next, insects gets nectar.
  237. 237. “Wow!” “Look how this flower has evolved to be white, and shaped in a way so I can visit it.”
  238. 238. • Seed dispersal
  239. 239. • You can now complete these questions on your bundled homework.
  240. 240. • You can now complete these questions on your bundled homework.
  241. 241.  Commensalism: One organism benefits while the other doesn’t benefit, or suffer harm.
  242. 242. • The remora just hitches a ride to grab some scraps after the kill.
  243. 243. “I’m not a cleaner bird.” “I’m just here for the protection”
  244. 244. “After my nap, can you please feed me…Thanks.”
  245. 245. • Epiphytes – Can be parasitic if they shade out the host tree.
  246. 246. • Epiphytes – Can be parasitic if they shade out the host tree.
  247. 247. • Epiphytes – Can be parasitic if they shade out the host tree.
  248. 248. • A bird may benefit from a tree for shelter and raising young. – The tree neither benefits, nor is caused harm.
  249. 249. • A bird may benefit from a tree for shelter and raising young. – The tree neither benefits, nor is caused harm. Learn more about birds and their relationships at… http://webecoist.momtastic.com/2009/03/01/symbiotic-bird- animal-relationships/
  250. 250. Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition?
  251. 251. Lamprey Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition?
  252. 252. Lamprey Lake Trout Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition?
  253. 253. Lamprey Lake Trout Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition?
  254. 254. Lamprey Lake Trout Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition?
  255. 255. Lamprey Lake Trout Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition?
  256. 256. Lamprey Lake Trout Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition?
  257. 257. Lamprey Lake Trout Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition?
  258. 258. Lamprey Lake Trout Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition?
  259. 259. Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition? Honeysuckle Hummingbird
  260. 260. Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition? Honeysuckle Hummingbird
  261. 261. Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition? Honeysuckle Hummingbird
  262. 262. Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition? Honeysuckle Hummingbird
  263. 263. Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition? Honeysuckle Hummingbird
  264. 264. Neutral Neutral Neutral Interspecific Competition? Honeysuckle Hummingbird
  265. 265. • You are made of more than 65 trillion human cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  266. 266. • You are made of more than 65 trillion human cells. – Multiply that number by 10 and that’s how many bacteria are living in your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  267. 267. • You are made of more than 65 trillion human cells. – Multiply that number by 10 and that’s how many bacteria are living in your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  268. 268. • You are made of more than 65 trillion human cells. – Multiply that number by 10 and that’s how many bacteria are living in your body. • Your microbiome is very important to your survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  269. 269. • Bacteria live in our body. They are…
  270. 270. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food.
  271. 271. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food.
  272. 272. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm.
  273. 273. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  274. 274. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  275. 275. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  276. 276. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  277. 277. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  278. 278. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  279. 279. • You can now complete these questions on your bundled homework.
  280. 280. • Reading Link! Each group must report to the class about a marine symbiosis. – http://www.ehow.com/info_8208885_symbioti c-between-animals-marine-biome.html – Imperial Shrimp and Sea Cucumbers – Clownfish and Anemones – Sharks and Remoras – Green Turtles and Cleaning Fish Maybe we should act out the symbiosis?
  281. 281. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tst Please visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet
  282. 282. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p=1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
  283. 283. • This PowerPoint is one small part of my Ecology Interactions Unit. This unit includes • 3 Part 2000+ Slide PowerPoint • 12 page bundled homework packaged that chronologically follows PowerPoint, + modified version and answer keys. • 7 pages of unit notes with visuals • 3 PowerPoint review games with answer keys. • Rubrics, games, flash cards and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactio ns_Unit.html
  284. 284. Areas of Focus within The Ecology Interactions Unit: Levels of Biological Organization (Ecology), Parts of the Biosphere, Habitat, Ecological Niche, Types of Competition, Competitive Exclusion Theory, Animal Interactions, Food Webs, Predator Prey Relationships, Camouflage, Population Sampling, Abundance, Relative Abundance, Diversity, Mimicry, Batesian Mimicry, Mullerian Mimicry, Symbiosis, Parasitism, Mutualism, Commensalism, Plant and Animal Interactions, Coevolution, Animal Strategies to Eat Plants, Plant Defense Mechanisms, Exotic Species, Impacts of Invasive Exotic Species. An entire mini unit of ecological succession is also included with homework, notes, field study project and PowerPoint review gameFull Unit can be found at… http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html
  285. 285. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  286. 286. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  287. 287. • Thank you for your time and interest in this curriculum tour. Please visit the welcome / guide on how a unit works and link to the many unit previews to see the PowerPoint slideshows, bundled homework, review games, unit notes, and much more. Thank you for your interest and please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Best wishes. • Sincerely, • Ryan Murphy M.Ed • ryemurf@gmail.com
  288. 288. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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