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Properties of Water Lesson PowerPoint, pH, High Specific Heat
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Properties of Water Lesson PowerPoint, pH, High Specific Heat

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This unit consists of a three part 1500 slide PowerPoint roadmap from sciencepowerpoint.com/ complete with a 14 page bundled homework package, modified version, 9 pages of unit notes, built-in …

This unit consists of a three part 1500 slide PowerPoint roadmap from sciencepowerpoint.com/ complete with a 14 page bundled homework package, modified version, 9 pages of unit notes, built-in hands-on activities with instructions and visuals, 25 video links, built-in quizzes, review games, answer keys, rubrics, worksheets that follow slideshow for classwork, complete student version of the unit, and much more.
Areas of Focus: -Locations of Water on the Planet, Importance of Water, Groundwater, Groundwater Pollution, The Water Molecule, Properties of Water, Polarity, Cohesion, Adhesion, Capillary Action, High Specific Heat, Water has a Neutral pH, lower density of ice, lake turnover, water cycle, three stares of matter, Water is the Universal Solvent, Mixtures, and much more.
I also sell all 20 Middle-Level Science Units as a curriculum package. This includes all 20 units (50,000 slides), in Life, Earth, and Physical Science for students in grades 5-10, This also includes 275 pages of bundled homework / assessment that chronologically follows each unit, 175 pages of modified assessments, 325 pages of answer keys, 260 pages of unit notes, 37 PowerPoint review games (5000+ slides), 315 videos, hundreds of pages of handouts, First Day PowerPoint, Guidebook, and Four Year Curriculum Guide and classroom license.
Thank you for time and if you have any questions please feel free to contact me at www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com. Best wishes.
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

Sincerely,
Ryan Murphy M.Ed
http://sciencepowerpoint.com/

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  • 1. • What is so special about the water in this photograph? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 2. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
  • 3. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 4. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn.
  • 5. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 6. • Available Sheet: Properties of Water. – Note: This will be due at the end of Part III. – Bring to class everyday.
  • 7. • Available Sheet: Properties of Water. – Note: This will be due at the end of Part III. – Bring to class everyday.
  • 8. • Activity or Demonstration. Surface Tension. – Caution! Pepper is dangerous, wear eye protection. – Sprinkle pepper into water. – Dab detergent on toothpick and touch.
  • 9. • Activity! • Try to float a paperclip on water. • Record your method? • How is this possible? • What will happen if you touch the surface with detergent? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 10. Surface tension: Water molecules tend toSurface tension: Water molecules tend to stick to themselves instead of the air.stick to themselves instead of the air. This creates a small film over the water.This creates a small film over the water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 11. • Surface tension: Water molecules tend toSurface tension: Water molecules tend to stick to themselves instead of the air.stick to themselves instead of the air. – This creates a small film over the water.This creates a small film over the water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 12. Water Molecules sticking to themselves because the are polar
  • 13. Water Molecules sticking to themselves because the are polar Water doesn’t cling to Oxygen and Nitrogen in Air
  • 14. • The Water strider takes advantage of surface tension. – It’s built to walk on water and feeds on insects that aren’t.
  • 15. • The Water strider takes advantage of surface tension. – It’s built to walk on water and feeds on insects that aren’t.
  • 16. • Video Link! The World of the Water Strider – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RphuMEUY3Og
  • 17. • The Jesus Lizard: (Basiliscus Plumifrons) – Has long toes and runs in a way that it can travel across the water to avoid predators. – Video! (Optional) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6ypoyZRTkg
  • 18. • Surface tension is what allows snowmobilers and dirt bikers to perform a stunt called skimming. – It’s illegal in many states and unsafe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 19. • Skimboarding is a perfectly safe and fun way to experience the thrills of surface tension. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 20. • Water skiing is another example of riding along the surface tension.
  • 21. • Water skiing is another example of riding along the surface tension. – It uses many other forces and requires velocity from the boat.
  • 22. • Hydroplaning: The loss of contact between a tire and a deck surface when the tire planes or glides on a film of water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 23. • Video Link! Hydroplaning. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdwuftIUwYY Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 24. Learn more about surface tension at… http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/sur
  • 25. • Available Sheet: Properties of Water. – Note: This will be due at the end of Part III. – Bring to class everyday.
  • 26. • Activity! High Specific heat. – Add one drop to the depression in the dish. – Two drops to the second dish. – Three drops to the third…etc – Place in freezer for 15 minutes Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 27. • Activity! High Specific heat. – Add one drop to the depression in the dish. – Two drops to the second dish. – Three drops to the third…etc – Place in freezer for 15 minutes Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 28. • Activity! High Specific heat. – Add one drop to the depression in the dish. – Two drops to the second dish. – Three drops to the third…etc – Place in freezer for 15 minutes Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 29. • Please describe the water temperature in early June in a lake.
  • 30. • Please describe the water temperature in early June in a lake. Chilly!
  • 31. • The lake is still cold in June because it takes a lot of energy to warm up a large body of water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 32. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 33. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 34. • Please describe the water temperature in September in the same lake. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 35. • Please describe the water temperature in September in the same lake. Warmer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 36. • Please describe the water temperature in September in the same lake. Warmer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 37. • No, it takes a lot of energy to cool it down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 38. • No, it takes a lot of energy to cool it down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 39. • In late fall / early winter, the temperatures near the sea coast are usually higher because the oceans are still releasing stored energy from the summer.
  • 40. • In late fall / early winter, the temperatures near the sea coast are usually higher because the oceans are still releasing stored energy from the summer.
  • 41. • In late fall / early winter, the temperatures near the sea coast are usually higher because the oceans are still releasing stored energy from the summer.
  • 42. • The high specific heat of water means that a lake won’t freeze or heat up suddenly.
  • 43. • The high specific heat of water means that a lake won’t freeze or heat up suddenly. – This gives aquatic organisms a chance to adjust to temperature changes slowly.
  • 44. • How long before you can put your hand in this water once removed from the stove?
  • 45. • How long before you can put your hand in this water once removed from the stove?
  • 46. • It all depends on… – Movement of air around pot. – Shape of the pot. – Liquid that is boiling. – Type of metal the pot is made from. – Amount of water exposed to the air – Air Pressure / Elevation – Amount of water, drop vs. several gallons. – Much more so this question can only be answered by conducting a study on that pot with that liquid.
  • 47. High Specific Heat: Hydrogen bonds absorbHigh Specific Heat: Hydrogen bonds absorb heat when they break, and release heatheat when they break, and release heat when they form.when they form. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 48. • Many people rely on the high specific heat property of water to heat their home.
  • 49. • Many people rely on the high specific heat property of water to heat their home. – Water is warmed in the boiler and then piped throughout the house before returning.
  • 50. It takes significant energy to change theIt takes significant energy to change the state of water.state of water. SolidSolid  LiquidLiquid  Gas.Gas. GasGas  LiquidLiquid  Solid.Solid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 51. It takes significant energy to change theIt takes significant energy to change the state of water.state of water. SolidSolid  LiquidLiquid  Gas.Gas. GasGas  LiquidLiquid  Solid.Solid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 52. It takes significant energy to change theIt takes significant energy to change the state of water.state of water. SolidSolid  LiquidLiquid  Gas.Gas. GasGas  LiquidLiquid  Solid.Solid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 53. It takes significant energy to change theIt takes significant energy to change the state of water.state of water. SolidSolid  LiquidLiquid  Gas.Gas. GasGas  LiquidLiquid  Solid.Solid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 54. It takes significant energy to change theIt takes significant energy to change the state of water.state of water. SolidSolid  LiquidLiquid  Gas.Gas. GasGas  LiquidLiquid  Solid.Solid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 55. • Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius.
  • 56. • How are the molecules behaving when water is in its gaseous form? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 57. • Answer! The molecules move very fast as a gas. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 58. • Available Sheet: Properties of Water. – Note: This will be due at the end of Part III. – Bring to class everyday.
  • 59. • Activity! High Specific heat. – Add one drop to the depression in the dish. – Two drops to the second dish. – Three drops to the third…etc – Place in freezer for 15 minutes Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 60. • Questions: High Specific Heat. • Predict which will be frozen and which won’t?
  • 61. • Questions: High Specific Heat. • Predict which will be frozen and which won’t? • The smaller amounts of water will freeze. The first to freeze will be the single drop, and the largest may not freeze.
  • 62. • Questions: High Specific Heat. • How does this show waters high specific heat?
  • 63. • Questions: High Specific Heat. • How does this show waters high specific heat? • This shows high specific heat because it took more energy to freeze the larger amounts of water.
  • 64. A B C D E F 1 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which letter represents the picture that will freeze first in the fall?
  • 65. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 66. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 67. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 68. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 69. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 70. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 71. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 72. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 73. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 74. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 75. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 76. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 77. • Which of the following pictures will freeze first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and last? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 78. A B C D E F 1 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which letter represents the picture that will require the most energy to boil?
  • 79. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th A B C D E F 1 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 80. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 81. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 82. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 83. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 84. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 85. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 86. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 87. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 88. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 89. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 90. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 91. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 92. • Which of the following pictures will require the most energy to boil…1st , 2nd ,3rd ,4th ,5th ,6th Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 93. Warm and cold water global currentsWarm and cold water global currents stabilize the temperature of the earth.stabilize the temperature of the earth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 94. • Warm water from the tropics flows north toward the ice caps. – This keeps the ice caps in the northern regions from creeping south. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 95. • Warm water from the tropics flows north toward the ice caps. – This keeps the ice caps in the northern regions from creeping south. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 96. • Warm water from the tropics flows north toward the ice caps. – This keeps the ice caps in the northern regions from creeping south. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 97. • Cold water from the north flows south toward the tropics. – This keeps the tropics from becoming to warm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 98. • Cold water from the north flows south toward the tropics. – This keeps the tropics from becoming to warm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 99. • Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
  • 100. • Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
  • 101. • Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
  • 102. • Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
  • 103. • Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
  • 104. • Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
  • 105. • Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
  • 106. • Video Link! (Gulf Stream) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLqL-TVcuGM
  • 107. • Without the ocean global conveyor of warm and cold currents,
  • 108. • Without the ocean global conveyor of warm and cold currents, the earth’s climate would become drastically different.
  • 109. • Without the ocean global conveyor of warm and cold currents, the earth’s climate would become drastically different. Learn more about water’s high specific heat at… http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/heat-capacity.html
  • 110. • You can now complete this page.
  • 111. • What is so special about the water in this photograph? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 112. • What is so special about the water in this photograph? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 113. • What is so special about the water in this photograph? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 114. • What is so special about the water in this photograph? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 115. • What is so special about the water in this photograph? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 116. • Compare the importance of water commonly existing in all three states of matter.
  • 117. • Compare the importance of water commonly existing in all three states of matter. Water commonly exists in all three states of matter
  • 118. • Compare the importance of water commonly existing in all three states of matter. Water commonly exists in all three states of matter Water exists commonly in it’s solid state
  • 119. • Compare the importance of water commonly existing in all three states of matter. Water commonly exists in all three states of matter Water exists commonly in it’s solid state
  • 120. • Compare the importance of water commonly existing in all three states of matter. Water exists commonly in it’s solid state
  • 121. • Compare the importance of water commonly existing in all three states of matter. Water exists commonly in it’s solid state
  • 122. • Compare the importance of water commonly existing in all three states of matter.
  • 123. • On the planet Mars, we can see that water is most abundant in it’s solid form of ice.
  • 124. Planet that is believed to have no water at all
  • 125. • Solid (s) has a definite shape and volume.Solid (s) has a definite shape and volume. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 126. MoleculesMolecules form aform a crystalcrystal lattice.lattice.
  • 127. MoleculesMolecules form aform a crystalcrystal lattice.lattice.
  • 128. • Liquid (l) Has definite volume but notLiquid (l) Has definite volume but not shape.shape. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 129. • Gas (g) No definite shape or volume.Gas (g) No definite shape or volume. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 130. • Gas (g) No definite shape or volume.Gas (g) No definite shape or volume. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 131. Water can exist on earth as a solid, liquid,Water can exist on earth as a solid, liquid, and gas.and gas. Water is a liquid between 0 and 100 degreesWater is a liquid between 0 and 100 degrees Celsius.Celsius. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 132. Water can exist on earth as a solid, liquid,Water can exist on earth as a solid, liquid, and gas.and gas. Water is a liquid between 0 and 100 degreesWater is a liquid between 0 and 100 degrees Celsius.Celsius. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 133. • Video! Simulation of water in a liquid form turning into a solid (ice). – How are the molecules behaving in a liquid state and solid state? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVR7tfsjPO0 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 134. • Does anyone know what the HydrologicDoes anyone know what the Hydrologic Cycle is? aka.. The Water Cycle.Cycle is? aka.. The Water Cycle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 135. • Does anyone know what the HydrologicDoes anyone know what the Hydrologic Cycle is? aka.. The Water Cycle.Cycle is? aka.. The Water Cycle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 136. • Does anyone know what the HydrologicDoes anyone know what the Hydrologic Cycle is?Cycle is? aka.. The Water Cycle.aka.. The Water Cycle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 137. • What do we already know? Explain yourselves with this template. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 138. • What do we already know? Explain yourselves with this template. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 139. • What do we already know? Explain yourselves with this template. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 140. • What do we already know? Explain yourselves with this template. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 141. • What do we already know? Explain yourselves with this template. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 142. • What do we already know? Explain yourselves with this template. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 143. • What do we already know? Explain yourselves with this template. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 144. • Which of the other terms are we unsure of.. – Condensation – Evaporation – Precipitation – Percolation – Transpiration – Sublimation – Infiltration – Ocean Storage – Ground Water Storage – Freshwater discharge – Surface run-off Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 145. • Which of the other terms are we unsure of.. – Condensation – Evaporation – Precipitation – Percolation – Transpiration – Sublimation – Infiltration – Ocean Storage – Ground Water Storage – Freshwater discharge – Surface run-off Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 146. • Which of the other terms are we unsure of.. – Condensation – Evaporation – Precipitation – Percolation – Transpiration – Sublimation – Infiltration – Ocean Storage – Ground Water Storage – Freshwater discharge – Surface run-off Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 147. Water is being continually created by many biophysicochemical processes. As such, water can be viewed as being constantly “refreshed” or “rejuvenated.”
  • 148. Water is being continually created by many biophysicochemical processes. As such, water can be viewed as being constantly “refreshed” or “rejuvenated.” The water in dinosaur pee is not the same water that we drink. The H’s and O’s that make up H2O are the same ones present when the dinosaurs roamed the Earth.
  • 149. The hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle):The hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle): Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 150. The hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle):The hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle): TheThe continuous movement of water on,continuous movement of water on, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 151. The hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle): TheThe hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle): The continuous movement of watercontinuous movement of water on,on, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 152. The hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle): TheThe hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle): The continuous movement of watercontinuous movement of water on,on, above,above, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 153. The hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle): TheThe hydrologic cycle (Water Cycle): The continuous movement of watercontinuous movement of water on,on, above,above, and belowand below the surface of the earth.the surface of the earth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 154. • Water Cycle Available Sheet
  • 155. • Water Cycle Available Sheet
  • 156. • Step by step drawing of the water cycle.
  • 157. Evaporation: Substance changes from aEvaporation: Substance changes from a liquid state to gas state (requires energy).liquid state to gas state (requires energy). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 158. • We usually think about oceans, but clouds also evaporate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 159. Condensation: Water vapor (gas) turns backCondensation: Water vapor (gas) turns back to a liquid. (Energy needs to be removed)to a liquid. (Energy needs to be removed) -- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 160. Condensation: Water vapor (gas) turns backCondensation: Water vapor (gas) turns back to a liquid. (Energy needs to be removed)to a liquid. (Energy needs to be removed) Cloud formation.Cloud formation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 161. • Water Cycle Available Sheet
  • 162. • Activity! Condensation – Teacher provides ice cold can of soda to table groups and students record temperature. – Students should observe each can for evidence of condensation.
  • 163. • Activity! Condensation Questions. – Why did condensation droplets form on the cold soda can? • Where did the water come from?
  • 164. • Activity! Condensation Questions. – Why did condensation droplets form on the cold soda can? • Where did the water come from? – Condensation formed on the cold soda can because water vapor near the soda can turned from a gas to a liquid.
  • 165. • Cloud formation occurs with water vapor and condensation nuclei. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 166. • Precipitation: Water that is so heavy it falls as liquid / solid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 167. • Precipitation can also be a solid in the form of snow, hail, or ice pellets. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 168. • Link! Water Cycle Flash Animation Tour – http://www.epa.gov/safewater/kids/flash/flash_wate
  • 169. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 10 cm from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water about 10 cm. • Add food coloring if you wish. – Slide cup into the bottle to just above the warm water with cap on. – Fill top bottle (cup) with ice cubes. • Do not overfill. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation) – Visual on next slide.
  • 170. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 4 inches from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water. – Invert top of bottle with cap and fill with ice cubes. – Slide cup with ice into the bottle to just above the warm water. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation)
  • 171. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 4 inches from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water. – Invert top of bottle with cap and fill with ice cubes. – Slide cup with ice into the bottle to just above the warm water. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation) Soda bottle cut by teacher,
  • 172. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 4 inches from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water. – Invert top of bottle with cap and fill with ice cubes. – Slide cup with ice into the bottle to just above the warm water. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation) Soda bottle cut by teacher,
  • 173. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 4 inches from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water. – Invert top of bottle with cap and fill with ice cubes. – Slide cup with ice into the bottle to just above the warm water. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation) Soda bottle cut by teacher, Next fill bottle with very warm water and food coloring.
  • 174. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 4 inches from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water. – Invert top of bottle with cap and fill with ice cubes. – Slide cup with ice into the bottle to just above the warm water. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation) Soda bottle cut by teacher, Next fill bottle with very warm water and food coloring.
  • 175. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 4 inches from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water. – Invert top of bottle with cap and fill with ice cubes. – Slide cup with ice into the bottle to just above the warm water. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation) Soda bottle cut by teacher, then flipped, Next fill bottle with very warm water and food coloring.
  • 176. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 4 inches from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water. – Invert top of bottle with cap and fill with ice cubes. – Slide cup with ice into the bottle to just above the warm water. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation) Soda bottle cut by teacher, then flipped, and filled with ice cubes by students. Next fill bottle with very warm water and food coloring.
  • 177. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 4 inches from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water. – Invert top of bottle with cap and fill with ice cubes. – Slide cup with ice into the bottle to just above the warm water. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation) Soda bottle cut by teacher, then flipped, and filled with ice cubes by students. Next fill bottle with very warm water and food coloring.
  • 178. • Activity! Water Cycle in a Bottle. – Each group needs a standard 2 liter clear soda bottle cut in half about 4 inches from the top. • (Have teacher cut in advance) – Fill bottle with very warm water. – Invert top of bottle with cap and fill with ice cubes. – Slide cup with ice into the bottle to just above the warm water. – Watch for evaporation, condensation, and the droplets falling back down to the warm water (precipitation) Soda bottle cut by teacher, then flipped, and filled with ice cubes by students. Next fill bottle with very warm water and food coloring. Strange kind of creepy video of water molecules in the hydrologic cycle as we wait (Optional 2 min) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StPobH5ODTw
  • 179. • Activity! Stranded on a Desert Island.
  • 180. • Activity! Stranded on a Desert Island. – You and your group must use the materials provided (and the water cycle) to turn salt water into freshwater over the next several days in order to survive. Use the sun as the energy source. – Each group gets a clear plastic box, glass cup, plastic wrap, marbles / pebbles, salt water mixed with sand, and a bungee cord / large elastic. – Visual of materials on next slide. – Video Link of set-up. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sqRvUzqDCE
  • 181. • Materials for the set-up. Saltwater and Sand Cup Marbles Elastic Plastic wrap
  • 182. • Materials for the set-up. Saltwater and Sand Cup Marbles Elastic Plastic wrap
  • 183. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater.
  • 184. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater.
  • 185. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater. Saltwater evaporates from sun energy into vapor.
  • 186. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater. Saltwater evaporates from sun energy into vapor.
  • 187. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater. Saltwater evaporates from sun energy into vapor.
  • 188. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater. Saltwater evaporates from sun energy into vapor Leaves salt behind.
  • 189. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater. Colder temperatures on edge of container cause…
  • 190. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater. Colder temperatures on edge of container cause… Condensation
  • 191. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater. Water adheres to the plastic wrap, travels down and falls into the cup as freshwater…
  • 192. • Below is the correct set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater. Water adheres to the plastic wrap, travels down and falls into the cup as freshwater… Precipitation
  • 193. • Below is the set-up to use the water cycle to turn salt water into freshwater. Water adheres to the plastic wrap, travels down and falls into the cup as freshwater… Precipitation
  • 194. Sublimation: Solid state turns directly to aSublimation: Solid state turns directly to a gas state skipping liquid phase.gas state skipping liquid phase. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 195. Sublimation: Solid state turns directly to aSublimation: Solid state turns directly to a gas state skipping liquid phase.gas state skipping liquid phase. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy See neat dry Ice Bubble: Sublimation (solid to gas) at… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76CNkxizQuc 2 min
  • 196. Transpiration – Water released by plantsTranspiration – Water released by plants into air.into air. Non-living to the living, and back again.Non-living to the living, and back again. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 197. • Transpiration – Water released by plants into air. – Non-living to the living, and back again. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 198. • Does this animation look like a water molecule leaving the leaf or a face? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 199. • Evapotranspiration is a vital component to the rainforest ecosystem. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 200. • Evapotranspiration is a vital component to the rainforest ecosystem. – Evapotranspiration describes water that is turned into a gas by evaporation, and water vapor released by plants (transpiration). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 201. • Activity! Transpiration. – Place a clear plastic bag over a section of plant. – Secure bag at base of stem so it is relatively tight. – Water plant and set in the sun. – Observe water droplets / evidence of transpiration the next day.
  • 202. • Activity! Transpiration. – Place a clear plastic bag over a section of plant. – Secure bag at base of stem so it is relatively tight. – Water plant and set in the sun. – Observe water droplets / evidence of transpiration the next day.
  • 203. • Activity! Transpiration. – Place a clear plastic bag over a section of plant. – Secure bag at base of stem so it’s relatively tight. – Water plant and set in the sun. – Observe water droplets / evidence of transpiration the next day.
  • 204. • Activity! Transpiration. – Place a clear plastic bag over a section of plant. – Secure bag at base of stem so it’s relatively tight. – Water plant and set in the sun. – Observe water droplets / evidence of transpiration the next day.
  • 205. • Activity! Transpiration. – Place a clear plastic bag over a section of plant. – Secure bag at base of stem so it’s relatively tight. – Water plant and set in the sun. – Observe water droplets / evidence of transpiration the next day.
  • 206. Alternative method / extension at… http://gcuonline.georgian.edu/wootton/transpiration.htm
  • 207. Surface run-off: The water flow which occursSurface run-off: The water flow which occurs when soil is full to capacity and excess waterwhen soil is full to capacity and excess water travels over the land.travels over the land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 208. • Surface run-off: The water flow which occurs when soil is full to capacity and excess water travels over the land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Capacity: ?
  • 209. • Surface run-off: The water flow which occurs when soil is full to capacity and excess water travels over the land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Capacity: The maximum amount that can be obtained in a body.
  • 210. • Storage of water in vegetation. – Plants soak up and hold water. They are very good flood preventers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 211. • Storage of water in vegetation. – Plants soak up and hold water. They are very good flood preventers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Trees can hold enormous amounts of water.s
  • 212. • Storage of water in vegetation. – Plants soak up and hold water. They are very good flood preventers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Trees can hold enormous amounts of water.s
  • 213. • Storage of water in vegetation. – Plants soak up and hold water. They are very good flood preventers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 214. • Storage of water in vegetation. – Plants soak up and hold water. They are very good flood preventers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Trees help control flooding by holding water in their tissues.
  • 215. Percolation: The slow movement of waterPercolation: The slow movement of water through the soil. Cleans and purifies.through the soil. Cleans and purifies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 216. Filtering Water Activity / Infiltration
  • 217. Soda bottle cut by teacher or parent, Filtering Water Activity / Infiltration
  • 218. Soda bottle cut by teacher or parent, invert the top like so. Filtering Water Activity / Infiltration
  • 219. Soda bottle cut by teacher or parent, invert the top like so. Add cap Filtering Water Activity / Infiltration
  • 220. Soda bottle cut by teacher or parent, invert the top like so. Add cap Filtering Water Activity / Infiltration Teacher is going to create nasty water with coffee grounds, garlic powder, and vegetable oil, and salt.
  • 221. Soda bottle cut by teacher or parent, invert the top like so. Add cap Your group must brainstorm methods to filter water, bring in the materials as a group and assemble tomorrow. Filtering Water Activity / Infiltration Teacher is going to create nasty water with coffee grounds, garlic powder, and vegetable oil, and salt.
  • 222. Soda bottle cut by teacher or parent, invert the top like so. Add cap Your group must brainstorm methods to filter water, bring in the materials as a group and assemble tomorrow. Filtering Water Activity / Infiltration Teacher is going to create nasty water with coffee grounds, garlic powder, and vegetable oil, and salt. Teacher will add dirty water to the top.
  • 223. Soda bottle cut by teacher or parent, invert the top like so. Add cap Your group must brainstorm methods to filter water, bring in the materials as a group and assemble tomorrow. Filtering Water Activity / Infiltration Teacher is going to create nasty water with coffee grounds, garlic powder, and vegetable oil, and salt. Teacher will add dirty water to the top. Filtering Materials
  • 224. Soda bottle cut by teacher or parent, invert the top like so. Add cap Your group must brainstorm methods to filter water, bring in the materials as a group and assemble tomorrow. Filtering Water Activity / Infiltration Teacher is going to create nasty water with coffee grounds, garlic powder, and vegetable oil, and salt. Teacher will add dirty water to the top. Filtering Materials How clear can your group get the water?
  • 225. • Answer: Percolation trapped the larger particles as the water moves through the soil.
  • 226. Groundwater discharge: Water that has beenGroundwater discharge: Water that has been underground seeps back into the oceans, orunderground seeps back into the oceans, or into rivers or lakes.into rivers or lakes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 227. • Groundwater is a very important source of clean water. – It can be obtained by digging a well, or when it comes to the surface as a spring. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 228. • Groundwater is a very important source of clean water. – It can be obtained by digging a well, or when it comes to the surface as a spring. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 229. • Water can be stored in… – Oceans – Ice / snow – Surface water – Groundwater – Soil and Organisms – Atmosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 230. • Water can be stored in… – Oceans – Ice / snow – Surface water – Groundwater – Soil and Organisms – Atmosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 231. • Water can be stored in… – Oceans – Ice / snow – Surface water – Groundwater – Soil and Organisms – Atmosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 232. • Water can be stored in… – Oceans – Ice / snow – Surface water – Groundwater – Soil and Organisms – Atmosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 233. • Water can be stored in… – Oceans – Ice / snow – Surface water – Groundwater – Soil and Organisms – Atmosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 234. • Water can be stored in… – Oceans – Ice / snow – Surface water – Groundwater – Soil and Organisms – Atmosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 235. • Water can be stored in… – Oceans – Ice / snow – Surface water – Groundwater – Soil and Organisms – Atmosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 236. • Activity! Not Smart Board. – Teacher on next slide to minimize out of slideshow. – Students should drag the terms to the correct position on the picture. – Answer revealed after.
  • 237. Possible Answer
  • 238. • Video Song! (Optional) The Water Cycle. – Very strange but extremely catchy. – Teacher should preview prior as it contains some strange parts. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zejk_iNFfPA Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 239. • Water Cycle Available Sheet
  • 240. • Quiz 1-7 The hydrologic cycle. Please record the numbers and the correct term. 7. 8.) Which term is not shown. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 241. • Quiz 1-7 The hydrologic cycle. Please record the numbers and the correct term. 7. 8.) Which term is not shown. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 242. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 243. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 244. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 245. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 246. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 247. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 248. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 249. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 250. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Runoff Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 251. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Runoff Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 252. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface RunoffPercolation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 253. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface RunoffPercolation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 254. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface RunoffPercolation Ground Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 255. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface RunoffPercolation Ground Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy What terms was missing that we learned?
  • 256. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-offPercolation Ground Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sublimation #8 Sublimation
  • 257. “For those who haven’t contributed yet…”
  • 258. • Quiz 1-8 The hydrologic cycle. Please record the numbers and the correct term. 7. 8.) Which term is not shown. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 259. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 260. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 261. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Evapotranspiration Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 262. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Evapotranspiration Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 263. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 264. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 265. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 266. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 267. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-off Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 268. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-off Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 269. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-offPercolation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 270. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-offPercolation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 271. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-offPercolation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 272. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-offPercolation Ground Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 273. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-offPercolation Ground Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy What terms was missing that we learned?
  • 274. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-offPercolation Ground Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sublimation #8 Sublimation
  • 275. “There are a few who still haven’t gone.”…
  • 276. • Quiz 1-8 The hydrologic cycle. Please record the numbers and the correct term. 7. 8.) Which term is not shown. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 277. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 278. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 279. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 280. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 281. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 282. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 283. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 284. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 285. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Runoff Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 286. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Runoff Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 287. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface RunoffPercolation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 288. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface RunoffPercolation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 289. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface RunoffPercolation Ground Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 290. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface RunoffPercolation Ground Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy What terms was missing that we learned?
  • 291. • Answers1-8 The hydrologic cycle. 7. Evaporation Transpiration Condensation Precipitation Surface Run-offPercolation Ground Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sublimation #8 Sublimation
  • 292. The Water Cycle. Learn more at… http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle.html
  • 293. • Available Sheet: Properties of Water. – Note: This will be due at the end of Part III. – Bring to class everyday.
  • 294. • Activity! How does cold water behave? – Drop a colored ice cube into a glass of water and record what happens in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 295. • Answer! Cold water sinks. The colder blue water from the ice cube sank to the bottom. – Cold water sinks…But what happens to really cold water? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 296. • Answer! Cold water sinks. The colder blue water from the ice cube sank to the bottom. – Cold water sinks…But what happens to really cold water? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 297. Lower Density of Ice: Water forms aLower Density of Ice: Water forms a crystal lattice when it freezes which is lesscrystal lattice when it freezes which is less dense than water…Ice Floats!dense than water…Ice Floats! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 298. • Animation of water molecules forming a crystal lattice (ice). – Molecules attach to each other with + and – bonds. They do not move quickly around when in the solid state. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIW65QLWs
  • 299. • What if ice sank? How would the world be different as we know it? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 300. • Answer! The world would be a much different place. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 301. • Ice would form and then sink to the bottom. On the next cold day / night more ice would form and sink. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 302. • This process would continue until the lake was frozen solid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 303. • This process would continue until the lake was frozen solid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 304. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 305. • Aquatic organisms would die, the planets climate would shift dramatically as the ice at the poles would accumulate. – Life as we know it would change for the worse. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 306. • What’s a Turnover?
  • 307. • What’s a Turnover? • Answer: A dish made by folding a pastry over some filling.
  • 308. • What’s a turnover?
  • 309. • What’s a turnover? • Answer: A turnover is when the team with the ball loses possession of the ball, which is then gained by the other team.
  • 310. • What’s a turnover? • Answer: A turnover is when the team with the ball loses possession of the ball, which is then gained by the other team.
  • 311. • What’s a turnover? • Answer: A turnover is when the team with the ball loses possession of the ball, which is then gained by the other team.
  • 312. • What’s a Turnover? • Answer: Measures how long a fund holds on to the stocks it buys. The longer a mutual fund holds on to a stock and the less trading the fund does, the lower the turnover will be…
  • 313. • What’s a Turnover? • Answer: Measures how long a fund holds on to the stocks it buys. The longer a mutual fund holds on to a stock and the less trading the fund does, the lower the turnover will be…
  • 314. • What’s turnover?
  • 315. • What’s turnover? • Answer: The rate at which an employer gains and loses employees.
  • 316. • What’s Lake Turnover?
  • 317. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer:
  • 318. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer:
  • 319. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer:
  • 320. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer:
  • 321. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer:
  • 322. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer:
  • 323. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer:
  • 324. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer:
  • 325. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer:
  • 326. • What’s Lake Turnover? • Answer: A process where the layers that form in a lake are mixed seasonally.
  • 327. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well • These get colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 328. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well • These get colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 329. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • These get colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering . Cold Wind
  • 330. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 331. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 332. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 333. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 334. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 335. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 336. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 337. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 338. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 339. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 340. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered. – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering .
  • 341. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered. – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers
  • 342. • Available Sheet: Properties of Water. – Note: This will be due at the end of Part III. – Bring to class everyday.
  • 343. • Lake Turnover… – Fall - Air temperatures drop, and the upper layers of water get cold. – Wind and chop mix the upper layers as well. • Upper water layer gets colder, denser, heavier, and sink. – Colder water displaces the water the lake bottom forcing the lower layers to the surface. – Winter - Ice forms layer over water. Lake becomes layered. – Spring – Melting ice causes water to sink and mixes layers – Summer – Warm temperatures cause layering.
  • 344. • Please draw the following in your journal. – (About ½ Page)
  • 345. Epilimnion
  • 346. Epilimnion
  • 347. • Epilimnion: The upper layer in a layered lake. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 348. Epilimnion Thermocline
  • 349. • Thermocline: A layer within a body of water where the temperature changes rapidly with depth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 350. Epilimnion Thermocline
  • 351. Epilimnion Thermocline
  • 352. Epilimnion Thermocline
  • 353. Epilimnion Thermocline
  • 354. Epilimnion Thermocline Low Oxygen because isolated from oxygen sources.
  • 355. • Cold water fish such as trout and salmon enjoy the colder temperatures and oxygen levels of the thermocline. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 356. • Cold water fish such as trout and salmon enjoy the colder temperatures and oxygen levels of the thermocline. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 357. • Cold water fish such as trout and salmon enjoy the colder temperatures and oxygen levels of the thermocline. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 358. Epilimnion Thermocline Hypolimnion
  • 359. • Hypolimnion - The bottom and most dense layer of water in a lake. Non-circulatory and remains cold throughout the year Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 360. Epilimnion Thermocline Hypolimnion Summer Stagnation in a Lake
  • 361. • Activity! Creating Lake Turnover in a Jar.
  • 362. • Activity! Creating Lake Turnover in a Jar. – Teacher will have ice cold water (blue food coloring) – Very hot water (red food coloring) – Pour in cold water first. – Then use Petri dish as cover and pour the hot on top of the cold without mixing the layers.
  • 363. • Activity! Creating Lake Turnover in a Jar. – Teacher will have ice cold water (blue food coloring) – Very hot water (red food coloring)
  • 364. • Activity! Creating Lake Turnover in a Jar. – Teacher will have ice cold water (blue food coloring) – Very hot water (red food coloring) – Pour in cold water first.
  • 365. • Activity! Creating Lake Turnover in a Jar. – Teacher will have ice cold water (blue food coloring) – Very hot water (red food coloring) – Pour in cold water first. – Then use Petri dish as cover and pour the hot on top of the cold without mixing the layers.
  • 366. • Activity! Set-up of Lake Turnover. Cold Hot Device to prevent mixing Remove after.
  • 367. • Activity! Lake Turnover. – Please observe the layering of the Lake in summer (Start) – Teacher will ask students to blow on top layers. (Early Fall) – Teacher will add ice cubes (Early Winter) – Same effect occurs with Spring
  • 368. • Activity! Lake Turnover – Please sketch the following in your journal. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 369. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 370. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 371. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 372. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 373. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 374. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 375. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Layers form under ice
  • 376. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 377. Summer Stagnation Fall Turnover Winter Stagnation Spring Turnover Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 378. • Activity! Lake Turnover Question. – Please describe in three sentences how a lake changes throughout the year. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 379. • Possible Answer: Throughout the year, a lake goes through many changes. In the summer the lake has three distinct layers. Colder temperatures and wind in the fall mix the layers. After the ice forms across the lake, winter layers form. The melting ice mixes the layers in the spring. The lake returns to it’s summer layering when the temperatures warm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 380. • Possible Answer: Throughout the year, a lake goes through many changes. In the summer the lake has three distinct layers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 381. • Possible Answer: Throughout the year, a lake goes through many changes. In the summer the lake has three distinct layers. Colder temperatures and wind in the fall mix the layers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 382. • Possible Answer: Throughout the year, a lake goes through many changes. In the summer the lake has three distinct layers. Colder temperatures and wind in the fall mix the layers. After the ice forms across the lake, winter layers form. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 383. • Possible Answer: Throughout the year, a lake goes through many changes. In the summer the lake has three distinct layers. Colder temperatures and wind in the fall mix the layers. After the ice forms across the lake, winter layers form. The melting ice mixes the layers in the spring. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 384. • Possible Answer: Throughout the year, a lake goes through many changes. In the summer the lake has three distinct layers. Colder temperatures and wind in the fall mix the layers. After the ice forms across the lake, winter layers form. The melting ice mixes the layers in the spring. The lake returns to it’s summer layering when the temperatures warm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 385. • Possible Answer: Throughout the year, a lake goes through many changes. In the summer the lake has three distinct layers. Colder temperatures and wind in the fall mix the layers. After the ice forms across the lake, winter layers form. The melting ice mixes the layers in the spring. The lake returns to it’s summer layering when the temperatures warm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about lake turnover at… http://www.islandnet.com/~see/weather/elements/turnlakes.htm
  • 386. • You can now complete this page.
  • 387. • Video Link! Lake Turnover (Optional) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSFSNTI67wc
  • 388. • Lab activity link (Optional) The Effect of Acid Rain on Seed Growth. (Begin Today) – http://serc.carleton.edu/sp/mnstep/activities/35685.h
  • 389. • Which of the following would you drink? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 390. Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 391. Acid Water / neutral Base Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 392. Acid Water / neutral Base Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 393. Acid Water / Neutral Base Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 394. Acid Water / neutral Base Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 395. Acid Water / Neutral Base Sea water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 396. Acid Water / Neutral Base Sea water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 397. • The average pH of soft drinks, e.g. Coke/ Pepsi is a pH 3.4. This acidity is strong enough to dissolve teeth and bones! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 398. • The average pH of soft drinks, e.g. Coke/ Pepsi is a pH 3.4. This acidity is strong enough to dissolve teeth and bones! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 399. • Video Link! (Optional) Mtn. Dew Mouth. – How Mtn. Dew and other sodas can cause serious tooth decay if misused. – http://www.mefeedia.com/video/14377911 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 400. Water in a pure state has a neutral pH. Pure water is neither acidic or basic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 401. • Water in a pure state has a neutral pH. – Pure water is neither acidic or basic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Neutral:
  • 402. • Water in a pure state has a neutral pH. – Pure water is neither acidic or basic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Neutral: In the middle. Not favoring one side or the other.
  • 403. • Water in a pure state has a neutral pH. – Pure water is neither acidic or basic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 404. The pH scale goes 1-14 7 is neutral 1 is Acidic 14 is basic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 405. The pH scale goes 1-14 7 is neutral 1 is Acidic 14 is basic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 406. The pH scale goes 1-14 7 is neutral 1 is Acidic 14 is basic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 407. The pH scale goes 1-14 7 is neutral 1 is Acidic 14 is basic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 408. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 409. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 410. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 411. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 412. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 413. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 414. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 415. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 416. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 417. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 418. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 419. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 420. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 421. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 422. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 423. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 424. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 425. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 426. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 427. • Please decided whether the box is placed in an area of the pH scale that is… – Acidic -Neutral -Basic
  • 428. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below?
  • 429. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below?
  • 430. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below?
  • 431. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below? Answer: pH of 10.
  • 432. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below? Answer: pH of 10. Is that an acid or base?
  • 433. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below? Answer: pH of 10. Is that an acid or base?
  • 434. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below?
  • 435. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below?
  • 436. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below?
  • 437. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below? Answer: pH of 3
  • 438. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below? Answer: pH of 3 Is that an Acid or a Base?
  • 439. • What is the pH of the two pieces of Litmus Paper below? Answer: pH of 3 Is that an Acid or a Base?
  • 440. • What color best represents distilled water?
  • 441. • What color best represents distilled water?
  • 442. • What color best represents distilled water? • Answer: Olive / Green
  • 443. • What color best represents distilled water? • Answer: Olive / Green Is it an acid or a base?
  • 444. • What color best represents distilled water? • Answer: Olive / Green Is it an acid or a base? Trick, It’s Neutral
  • 445.  pH - An expression for the effective concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 446. • The strength of an acid is based on the concentration of H+ (hydrogen) ions in the solution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 447. • This is what can happen if your sensitive skin comes in contact with dangerous acid.
  • 448. • This is what can happen if your sensitive skin comes in contact with dangerous acid.
  • 449. • What if I am splashed with something that is extremely basic?
  • 450. • The same result! Both ends of the pH scale are extremely dangerous and need to be respected.
  • 451. • Acid burns are real and pose a very serious health risk. Know about them in your house and workplace. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 452. • Acid burns are real and pose a very serious health risk. Know about them in your house and workplace. – Always wear the proper safety gear when working with dangerous materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 453. • Picture of laborers collecting sulfur in a dangerous sulfur mine. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 454. • Picture of laborers collecting sulfur in a dangerous sulfur mine. – Life expectancy of these workers is very young as the sulfuric acid in the air they breath burns their lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 455. • Picture of an acid lake on top of a volcano.
  • 456. • The strength of a base is determined by the concentration of Hydroxide ions (OH-) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 457. • Activity! Using litmus paper to test solutions to see if they are acidic or basic. – Please wear goggles and gloves at all times and avoid any skin contact. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about pH and water at… http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/ph.html
  • 458. • Available Sheet: Properties of Water. – Note: This will be due at the end of Part III. – Bring to class everyday.
  • 459. • Activity! pH – Please create 7 small circles in a row. Use a penny to assist you.
  • 460. • Activity! pH – Number your circles as follows. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14
  • 461. • Activity! pH – These will be done after all others. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14
  • 462. • Activity! pH – Color your circles according to the Litmus Paper. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14
  • 463. • Activity! pH – Color your circles according to the Litmus Paper. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14
  • 464. • Activity! pH – Visit each solution, test the pH and record the name of the solution under the correct circle. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 Optional: Teacher can pass out several popsicle sticks to each student. After pH has been recorded with litmus paper, students can dip popsicle stick into each solution and taste / label above. (Avoid contamination so dispose of stick after each taste) See Next Slide.
  • 465. • Activity! pH – Visit each solution, test the pH and record the name of the solution under the correct circle. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14
  • 466. • Activity! pH – Visit each solution, test the pH and record the name of the solution under the correct circle. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 Food coloring used to hide solutions
  • 467. • Activity! pH – Visit each solution, test the pH and record the name of the solution under the correct circle. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14
  • 468. • Activity! pH – Visit each solution, test the pH and record the name of the solution under the correct circle. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 Vinegar Milk Salt Lemon Baking Cola Soapy Pure Water Juice Soda Water Water
  • 469. • Activity! pH – Visit each solution, test the pH and record the name of the solution under the correct circle. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 Vinegar Milk Salt Lemon Baking Cola Soapy Pure Water Juice Soda Water Water 2.4 6.8 8 4 9 4 8 7
  • 470. • Activity! pH – Visit each solution, test the pH and record the name of the solution under the correct circle. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 Vinegar Milk Salt Lemon Baking Cola Soapy Pure Water Juice Soda Water Water 2.4 6.8 8 4 9 4 8 7
  • 471. • Activity! pH – Visit each solution, test the pH and record the name of the solution under the correct circle. 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 Vinegar Milk Salt Lemon Baking Cola Soapy Pure Water Juice Soda Water Water 2.4 6.8 8 4 9 4 8 7
  • 472. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 473. • Activity! Using litmus paper to test solutions to see if they are acidic or basic. – Please wear goggles and gloves at all times and avoid any skin contact. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 474. • Activity! Using litmus paper to test solutions to see if they are acidic or basic. – Please wear goggles and gloves at all times and avoid any skin contact. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Acid
  • 475. • Activity! Using litmus paper to test solutions to see if they are acidic or basic. – Please wear goggles and gloves at all times and avoid any skin contact. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Acid Base
  • 476. • Activity! pH Dangerous solutions. – Two mystery solutions. Which is the serious acid (1-2) and which is the base (12-14) 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14
  • 477. • Activity! pH Dangerous solutions. – Two mystery solutions. Which is the serious acid (1-2) and which is the base (12-14) 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 Hydrochloric Acid
  • 478. • Activity! pH Dangerous solutions. – Two mystery solutions. Which is the serious acid (1-2) and which is the base (12-14) 1-2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 Hydrochloric Acid Drain Cleaner Sodium Hydroxide
  • 479. • Test two mystery substances to see which is a dangerous acid, and which is a dangerous base.
  • 480. • Test two mystery substances to see which is a dangerous acid, and which is a dangerous base.
  • 481. • Test two mystery substances to see which is a dangerous acid, and which is a dangerous base. Sodium Hydroxide (Basic)
  • 482. • Test two mystery substances to see which is a dangerous acid, and which is a dangerous base. Sodium Hydroxide (Basic) Hydrochloric Acid (Acidic)
  • 483. • Lab Activity! Teacher Demo. (Optional) – Requires lab goggles and gloves and apron. – Please create four circles and label them… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CopperCopper
  • 484. • Demonstration! Acids and Bases – Add 5 drops of diluted HCL (6 molar) acid to each test tube / metal and record findings in the circles. – Look for bubbling, gas release, and color changes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Copper
  • 485. • Demonstration! Acids and Bases – Add 5 drops of diluted HCL (6 molar) acid to each test tube / metal and record findings in the circles. – Look for bubbling, gas release, and color changes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Copper
  • 486. • Demonstration! Acids and Bases – Add 5 drops of diluted HCL (6 molar) acid to each test tube / metal and record findings in the circles. Will burn skin and eyes! – Look for bubbling, gas release, and color changes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Copper
  • 487. • Demonstration! Acids and Bases – Add 5 drops of diluted HCL (6 molar) acid to each test tube / metal and record findings in the circles. – Look for bubbling, gas release, and color changes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Copper
  • 488. • Hydrochloric Acid can induce chemical change. • Zn + 2HCl -----> ZnCl2 + H2 (gas) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 489. • Hydrogen Explosive Bubbles Video Link – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrg8XlHEDJ8 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 490. • Water has a neutral pH, and therefore dissolves solutions or compounds of any pH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 491. • Acid Rain is caused by Nitrogen and Sulfur dioxides. aka – Air pollution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy NO3NOx SO2
  • 492. • Video Link! Acid Rain – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HE6Y0iEuXMQ
  • 493. • Activity! Acid Rain. – Draw one of the following on a note card depending on the number assigned. • 1 Car D • 2 Phytoplankton O • 3 Fish Q • 4 Pond N • 5 Forest Fire E • 6 Factory C • 7 Condensation G • 8 Wind I • 9 Rain Cloud J • 10 Precipitation K • 11 Insects R • 12 Volcano B • 13 Dead Fish F • 14 Sensitive Mtn .Plants M • 15 Dead Pine tree L • 16 Coal underground A • 17 Dead Insects P • 18 Cloud H Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 494. • Activity! Acid Rain. – Draw one of the following on a note card depending on the number assigned. • 1 Car D • 2 Phytoplankton O • 3 Fish Q • 4 Pond N • 5 Forest Fire E • 6 Factory C • 7 Condensation G • 8 Wind I • 9 Rain Cloud J • 10 Precipitation K • 11 Insects R • 12 Volcano B • 13 Dead Fish F • 14 Sensitive Mtn .Plants M • 15 Dead Pine tree L • 16 Coal underground A • 17 Dead Insects P • 18 Cloud H Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy On the next slide you will place your note card one at a time and try to create how air pollution becomes acid rain and how it effects the ecosystem.
  • 495. A B C D E F G H I J K L M NOPQ R
  • 496. • Activity! Acid Rain. – Draw one of the following on a note card depending on the number assigned. • 1 Car D • 2 Phytoplankton O • 3 Fish Q • 4 Pond N • 5 Forest Fire E • 6 Factory C • 7 Condensation G • 8 Wind I • 9 Rain Cloud J • 10 Precipitation K • 11 Insects R • 12 Volcano B • 13 Dead Fish F • 14 Sensitive Mtn .Plants M • 15 Dead Pine tree L • 16 Coal underground A • 17 Dead Insects P • 18 Cloud H Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 497. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 498. • Map showing greatest acid rain concentrations in the U.S.
  • 499. • Map showing greatest acid rain concentrations in the U.S.
  • 500. • Map showing greatest acid rain concentrations in the U.S.
  • 501. • Map showing greatest acid rain concentrations in the U.S.
  • 502. • Map showing greatest acid rain concentrations in the U.S.
  • 503. • Map showing greatest acid rain concentrations in the U.S.
  • 504. • Map showing greatest acid rain concentrations in the U.S.
  • 505. • Activity! Acid Rain. – Place each card on the board in a logical manner to represent how Acid Rain forms, travels, falls, and damages ecosystems. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 506. • Acid rain: Any form of precipitation that is unusually acidic. Usually around a pH of 5 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 507. • Question: If you swim in a pond that is affected by acid rain will you look like this?
  • 508. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 509. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 510. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 511. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 512. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 513. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 514. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 515. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 516. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 517. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 518. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain.
  • 519. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain. The result, a lake that looks beautiful but is biologically dead.
  • 520. • Answer: No! The change in pH (Acidity) will be small. This will have a large impact on the micro-organisms which then moves up the food chain. The result, a lake that looks beautiful but is biologically dead. Learn more about acid rain at… http://www.epa.gov/acidrain/
  • 521. • You can now think about this question.
  • 522. • You can now think about this question.
  • 523. • Cleopatra’s Needle in Egypt. (Dry) – Misnamed: They are ancient Egyptian obelisks and not connected to Cleopatra. – Three were removed from Egypt and brought to London, Paris and New York. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 524. • Brought to New York City • Water + Chemical Pollution = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 525. • Brought to New York City • Water + Chemical Pollution = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 526. • Activity / Video – View Video and Conduct Activity – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5qRnbhtako – Directions are on video. – Draw a before and after along with a quick procedure. – Materials, glass, chalk, vinegar, paper clip. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 527. Universal Solvent: Liquid water is able toUniversal Solvent: Liquid water is able to dissolve a large number of differentdissolve a large number of different chemical compounds.chemical compounds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 528. • The polarity of water pulls in other molecules and surrounds them with water molecules.
  • 529. • The polarity of water pulls in other molecules and surrounds them with water molecules. – This makes water such a great solvent.
  • 530. • Why are the water molecules attaching to Na+?
  • 531. • Remember the lopsided polar molecule of water + and –
  • 532. • Remember the lopsided polar molecule of water + and – (Note how – and + attract)
  • 533. • Na+ is Sodium.
  • 534. • Cl- is Chloride.
  • 535. • Together they make sodium chloride (table salt).
  • 536. • When mixed with water, they create salt water.
  • 537. • Water being the universal solvent is very important because… – Blood carries oxygen. – Blood carries Carbon Dioxide away.. – Blood carries sugar. – Blood carries minerals. – Blood carries medicine. – Blood carries hormones – Blood carries immune cells. – Blood carries out many more important functions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 538. • Water being the universal solvent is very important because… – Blood carries Oxygen. – Blood carries Carbon Dioxide away.. – Blood carries sugar. – Blood carries minerals. – Blood carries medicine. – Blood carries hormones – Blood carries immune cells. – Blood carries out many more important functions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy O2 O2 O2 Away from lungs
  • 539. • Water being the universal solvent is very important because… – Blood carries Oxygen. – Blood carries Carbon Dioxide away. – Blood carries sugar. – Blood carries minerals. – Blood carries medicine. – Blood carries hormones – Blood carries immune cells. – Blood carries out many more important functions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CO2 CO2 CO2 Toward lungs
  • 540. • Water being the universal solvent is very important because… – Blood carries Oxygen. – Blood carries Carbon Dioxide away. – Blood carries sugar. – Blood carries minerals. – Blood carries medicine. – Blood carries hormones – Blood carries immune cells. – Blood carries out many more important functions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 541. • Water being the universal solvent is very important because… – Blood carries Oxygen. – Blood carries Carbon Dioxide away. – Blood carries sugar. – Blood carries minerals. – Blood carries medicine. – Blood carries hormones – Blood carries immune cells. – Blood carries out many more important functions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 542. • Water being the universal solvent is very important because… – Blood carries Oxygen. – Blood carries Carbon Dioxide away. – Blood carries sugar. – Blood carries minerals. Salts help conduct… – Blood carries medicine. – Blood carries hormones – Blood carries immune cells. – Blood carries out many more important functions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 543. • Water being the universal solvent is very important because… – Blood carries Oxygen. – Blood carries Carbon Dioxide away. – Blood carries sugar. – Blood carries minerals. – Blood carries medicine. – Blood carries hormones – Blood carries immune cells. – Blood carries out many more important functions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 544. • Water being the universal solvent is very important because… – Blood carries Oxygen. – Blood carries Carbon Dioxide away. – Blood carries sugar. – Blood carries minerals. – Blood carries medicine. – Blood carries hormones. – Blood carries immune cells. – Blood carries out many more important functions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 545. • Water being the universal solvent is very important because… – Blood carries Oxygen. – Blood carries Carbon Dioxide away. – Blood carries sugar. – Blood carries minerals. – Blood carries medicine. – Blood carries hormones. – Blood carries immune cells. – Blood carries out many more important functions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 546. • Wat