Nutrients, Healthy Eating, Food, Health Lesson PowerPoint

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This is the nutrients of life, healthy eating, healthy living lesson PowerPoint from my Human Body System Unit found at www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This lesson explores the nutrients of life, and eating healthy. This lesson is one small part of my Human Body Systems Unit that I offer.

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Nutrients, Healthy Eating, Food, Health Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS A.) These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) B.) Raises LDL levels. They can also lower HDL levels ("good cholesterol"). C.) Trans-fatty acids are found in fried foods, commercial baked goods (donuts, cookies, crackers), processed foods, and margarines. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. Human Body Unit Part IV/XIII
  3. 3. Human Body Unit Part IV/XIII
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Disaccharide
  6. 6. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7. • Keep an eye out for “The-Owl” and raise your hand as soon as you see him. – He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8. “Hoot, Hoot” “Good Luck!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9. Human Body Unit Part IV/XIII
  10. 10. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates • Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Nucleic Acids – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life. – Origins of Life – Human Origins
  11. 11. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates – Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Nucleic Acids – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life. – Origins of Life – Human Origins
  12. 12. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates – Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Nucleic Acids – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life. – Origins of Life – Human Origins
  13. 13. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates – Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Nucleic Acids – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life. – Origins of Life – Human Origins
  14. 14. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates – Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Nucleic Acids – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life. – Origins of Life – Human Origins
  15. 15. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates – Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life. – Origins of Life – Human Origins “Eat me only in moderation.”
  16. 16. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates – Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life. – Origins of Life – Human Origins
  17. 17. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates – Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life. – Origins of Life – Human Origins
  18. 18. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates – Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life. – Origins of Life – Human Origins
  19. 19. • This unit will cover… – SPONCH – Carbohydrates – Proteins – Lipids (Fats) – Eating Healthy – Health Topics – Nucleic Acids – What is Life? – Needs of Life – Origins of Life – Human Origins
  20. 20. • What did you eat for breakfast today? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This unit is the property of Ryan P. Murphy copyright 2010
  22. 22. • By the end of the of this unit you should be able to describe, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23. • By the end of the of this unit you should be able to describe, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids. – This unit will help you understand the make-up of complex molecules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24. • By the end of the of this unit you should be able to describe, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids. – This unit will help you understand the make-up of complex molecules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25.  Area of Focus: SPONCH Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26.  25 of the 92 naturally occurring elements are essential for life.  SPONCH elements are the most biologically important. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27.  25 of the 92 naturally occurring elements are essential for life.  SPONCH elements are the most biologically important. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • Organic Chemistry: The chemistry of carbon compounds.
  29. 29. • Organic Chemistry: The chemistry of carbon compounds. – Carbon is the duct tape of life. It holds everything together.
  30. 30.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  33. 33.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  34. 34.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. • S. Sulfur Trace • P. Phosphorus 1.0% • O. Oxygen 65.0% • N. Nitrogen 3.3% • C. Carbon 18.5% • H. Hydrogen 9.56% • Other (Trace) 3.0% • Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  41. 41. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  42. 42. • Activity! Please complete an animal graph of the data you have just gathered. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Activity! Please complete an animal graph of the data you have just gathered. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Hey Joey, what’s an animal graph?”
  44. 44. • Activity! Please complete an animal graph of the data you have just gathered. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I don’t know?” “This teacher is crazy.”
  45. 45. • Draw a detailed animal of your choice. – About a ½ page in your journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • Then color fill with a crayon or colored pencil to approximate % of SPONCH elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • We now know what SPONCH is, what do you think the SPONCH CaFe is? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55. The next most important elements for life.  Ca= Calcium  Fe= Iron Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56. The next most important elements for life.  Ca= Calcium  Fe= Iron Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. The next most important elements for life.  Ca= Calcium 1.5%  Fe= Iron Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. The next most important elements for life.  Ca= Calcium 1.5%  Fe= Iron Trace Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. The next most important elements for life.  Ca= Calcium 1.5%  Fe= Iron Trace Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about basic organic chemistry at… http://www.biology.arizona.edu/biochemistry/tutorials/chemistr y/page1.html
  60. 60. • You can also complete this question.
  61. 61. • SPONCH molecules make – Carbohydrates (CHO) 1:2:1 – Protein (SONCH) – Lipids (fat) (CH with a few O) – Nucleic Acids DNA (SPONCH) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • SPONCH molecules make – Carbohydrates (CHO) 1:2:1 – Protein (SONCH) – Lipids (fat) (CH with a few O) – Nucleic Acids DNA (SPONCH) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • SPONCH molecules make – Carbohydrates (CHO) 1:2:1 – Protein (SONCH) – Lipids (fat) (CH with a few O) – Nucleic Acids DNA (SPONCH) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • SPONCH molecules make – Carbohydrates (CHO) 1:2:1 – Protein (SONCH) – Lipids (fat) (CH with a few O) – Nucleic Acids DNA (SPONCH) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • SPONCH molecules make – Carbohydrates (CHO) 1:2:1 – Protein (SONCH) – Lipids (fat) (CH with a few O) – Nucleic Acids DNA (PONCH) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. Carbohydrates (sugars) SPONCH Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  67. 67.  1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Proportion: The relation between things (or parts of things) with respect to their comparative quantity. Ratio: A general term; it is obtained by dividing one number by another.
  78. 78. • 1:2:1 ratio for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Proportion: The relation between things (or parts of things) with respect to their comparative quantity. Ratio: A general term; it is obtained by dividing one number by another.
  79. 79. • You can now complete this question on your bundled homework package.
  80. 80. • You can now complete this question on your bundled homework package.
  81. 81. • You can also complete this question.
  82. 82. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  83. 83.  Common sugars tend to end in “ose” Ex – glucose. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84. • Can you find the sugar below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • Answer: Fructose Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • You can now complete this question.
  87. 87. • You can now complete this question.
  88. 88.  There are two types of sugars  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89.  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90.  Complex Sugars:  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. • Video! (Optional) The Glucose Song. –What are some the functions of sugar to the human body described in the song / video? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJvAL-iiLnQ
  92. 92. • Cellulose: The Cell Walls in plants. – Strong sugar woven sugar that allows plants to be very tall. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93. • Chitin – Insect exoskeleton
  94. 94. • Starch is a complex sugar – (longer lasting energy) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. • Activity! Making Saltine Man / Women. – Add drops of diluted iodine in water onto the Saltine to make a face. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96. • Activity! Making Saltine Man / Women. – Add drops of diluted iodine (Antiseptic) in water onto the Saltine to make a face. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. • Activity! Testing for the presence of starch. – Iodine (Use diluted antiseptic) turns black when in the presence of starch. – Draw a picture of each test tube and make a prediction as to which one contains starch. – Test the samples on your tray with one drop of Iodine. Which have starch and which do not? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. • Starch is a major component of bread. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  99. 99. • Starch is a major component of bread. – We can find starch in breads and pasta, vegetables, and tubers like potatoes and yams. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. • Candy bars have lots of simple sugars such as glucose and fructose.
  101. 101. • Which picture represents simple sugars?
  102. 102. • Which picture represents simple sugars?
  103. 103. • Which picture represents simple sugars?
  104. 104. • Which picture represents simple sugars?
  105. 105. • Which picture represents simple sugars?
  106. 106. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  107. 107. • What types of food should you eat before an athletic event? – The night before vs. game time. – Should you eat the same things, different, talk it over and explain. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108. • Answer: Simple sugars such as a candy bar or sugar drink will give you quick short burst of energy, while complex sugars such as starch are longer lasting energy but require more time to break down.
  109. 109. • Answer: Simple sugars such as a candy bar or sugar drink will give you quick short burst of energy, while complex sugars such as starch are longer lasting energy and require more time to break down.
  110. 110. • Simple sugars can be broken down quickly for short energy, Complex sugars have more energy, but it takes longer to break them down. • Eat Complex the night before, more simple during the event. – A spaghetti dinner during halftime won’t help you. – A candy bar the night before won’t help you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111. • You can now complete this question on your bundled homework package.
  112. 112. • You can now complete this question on your bundled homework package.
  113. 113. • You can now complete this question on your bundled homework package.
  114. 114. Types of sugars • Sucrose = Glucose + Fructose • Lactose = Glucose + Galactose • Maltose = Glucose + Glucose Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115. Types of sugars • Sucrose = Glucose + Fructose • Lactose = Glucose + Galactose • Maltose = Glucose + Glucose Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  116. 116. Types of sugars • Sucrose = Glucose + Fructose • Lactose = Glucose + Galactose • Maltose = Glucose + Glucose Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  117. 117. Types of sugars • Sucrose = Glucose + Fructose • Lactose = Glucose + Galactose • Maltose = Glucose + Glucose Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  118. 118. • There are two types of sugars – Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly. • Monosaccharide: One sugar – Ex.) Glucose / Fructose • Disaccharide: Two Sugars – Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose – Complex Sugar • Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. – Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  119. 119. • There are two types of sugars – Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly. • Monosaccharide: One sugar – Ex.) Glucose / Fructose • Disaccharide: Two Sugars – Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose – Complex Sugar • Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. – Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  120. 120. • There are two types of sugars – Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly. • Monosaccharide: One sugar – Ex.) Glucose / Fructose • Disaccharide: Two Sugars – Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose – Complex Sugar • Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. – Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  121. 121. • There are two types of sugars – Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly. • Monosaccharide: One sugar – Ex.) Glucose / Fructose • Disaccharide: Two Sugars – Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose – Complex Sugar • Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. – Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  122. 122.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  123. 123.  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  125. 125.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Glucose / Fructose. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  126. 126.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  127. 127.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  128. 128.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  129. 129.  Disaccharides – two sugars.  Lactose, Sucrose. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  130. 130.  Disaccharides – two sugars.  Lactose, Sucrose. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  131. 131.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  132. 132.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  133. 133.  Complex Sugars:  Polysaccharides: Many sugars linked together  Ex.) Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  134. 134.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together.  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  135. 135.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together.  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together.  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  137. 137.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together.  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  138. 138.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together.  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  139. 139.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  140. 140.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  142. 142.  There are two types of sugars  Simple Sugars: Broken down quickly.  Monosaccharide: One sugar  Ex.) Glucose / Fructose  Disaccharide: Two Sugars  Ex.) Lactose / Sucrose  Complex Sugar  Starch / Fiber / Glycogen / Cellulose / Chitin.  Polysaccharides: many sugars linked together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143. • Glycogen: The storage form of glucose, comes from starch in plants. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. • Glycogen: The storage form of glucose, comes from starch in plants. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145. • Glycogen: The storage form of glucose, comes from starch in plants. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  146. 146. • Glycogen: The storage form of glucose, comes from starch in plants. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Monomer units (glucose)
  147. 147. • The branched structure of glycogen allows sugars to be removed easily for energy from many ends.. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148. • The branched structure of glycogen allows sugars to be removed easily for energy from many ends.. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  149. 149. • The branched structure of glycogen allows sugars to be removed easily for energy from many ends.. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  150. 150. • The branched structure of glycogen allows sugars to be removed easily for energy from many ends.. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  151. 151. • The branched structure of glycogen allows sugars to be removed easily for energy from many ends.. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  152. 152. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  153. 153. • Which is a monosaccharide, disaccharide, polysaccharide?
  154. 154. • Which is a monosaccharide, disaccharide, polysaccharide?
  155. 155. • Which is a monosaccharide, disaccharide, polysaccharide?
  156. 156. • Which is a monosaccharide, disaccharide, polysaccharide?
  157. 157. • Which is a monosaccharide, disaccharide, polysaccharide?
  158. 158. • Which is a monosaccharide, disaccharide, polysaccharide?
  159. 159. • Which is a monosaccharide, disaccharide, polysaccharide?
  160. 160. • Fiber: Carbohydrate the body cannot digest. – Soluble – Insoluble Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161. • Fiber: Carbohydrate the body cannot digest. – Soluble – Insoluble Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  162. 162. • Fiber: Carbohydrate the body cannot digest. – Soluble – Insoluble Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  163. 163. • Fiber: Carbohydrate the body cannot digest. – Soluble – Insoluble Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about carbohydrates and healthy eating at… http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyone/basics/carbs.html
  164. 164. • Activity! Everyone will be given a celery stick to give them some fiber today. Enjoy!
  165. 165. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166. • Insoluble fiber absorbs water, creates bulkier stools and helps to regulate the stool pattern. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167. • Insoluble fiber absorbs water, creates bulkier stools and helps to regulate the stool pattern. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168. • Insoluble fiber absorbs water, creates bulkier stools and helps to regulate the stool pattern. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169. “I should have ate more insoluble fiber to help me stay regular.”
  170. 170. • Soluble fiber: Absorbs water and becomes gelatinous and sticky.
  171. 171. • Soluble fiber: Absorbs water and becomes gelatinous and sticky. The down side for soluble fiber is that harmless gas forming bacteria in the colon may cause….
  172. 172. • Soluble fiber: Absorbs water and becomes gelatinous and sticky. The down side for soluble fiber is that harmless gas forming bacteria in the colon may cause….
  173. 173. • Do Baked Beans have lots of soluble or insoluble fiber?
  174. 174. • Do Baked Beans have lots of soluble or insoluble fiber? Answer! Soluble Fiber
  175. 175. • Do Baked Beans have lots of soluble or insoluble fiber? Answer! Soluble Fiber
  176. 176. • Fiber is very important to our bodies and is a necessary part of our Gastrointestinal Tract. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  177. 177. • Fiber is very important to our bodies and is a necessary part of our Gastrointestinal Tract. – Eat your daily fiber and stay regular….Poop Daily!  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. • Activity! Raise your hand if you had your poopy today.
  179. 179. • Activity! Raise your hand if you had your poopy today.
  180. 180. • Activity! Raise your hand if you had your poop today. “I Had a poopy Today!”
  181. 181. • Activity! Raise your hand if you had your poop today. “I Pooped too.”
  182. 182. • Activity! Raise your hand if you had your poop today. “I made a poopy!”
  183. 183. • Activity! Raise your hand if you had your poop today. “I just pooped my pants.”
  184. 184. • Activity! Raise your hand if you had your poop today.
  185. 185. • Activity! Raise your hand if you had your poop today. “I had my poopy”
  186. 186. • Okay, Floaters vs. Sinkers, What’s the deal here.
  187. 187. • Okay, Floaters vs. Sinkers, What’s the deal here.
  188. 188. • Okay, Floaters vs. Sinkers, What’s the deal here. – Sinkers are more common (more dense)
  189. 189. • Okay, Floaters vs. Sinkers, What’s the deal here. – Sinkers are more common (more dense) – Floaters: Increased gas content from bacteria. • Maybe from increased fiber, but don’t worry. Floaters are nice, but sinkers are our destiny.
  190. 190. • Video Link (Optional)! Structure of Carbohydrates. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QckfYvIlVu 4&feature=relmfu
  191. 191.  Polymer  Long complex chains of molecules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192.  Polymer  Long complex chains of molecules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  193. 193. • Check out this awesome complex polymer. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. • Check out this awesome complex polymer. – Everybody hold up an awesome example of a polymer. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • Check out this awesome complex polymer. – Everybody hold up an awesome example of a polymer. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196.  Protein – S O N C H (Amino acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197. • Proteins – s O N C H
  198. 198. • Proteins – s O N C H
  199. 199. • Proteins – s O N C H
  200. 200. • Proteins – s O N C H
  201. 201. • Proteins – s O N C H
  202. 202. • Proteins – s O N C H
  203. 203. • You can also complete this question.
  204. 204. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  205. 205. • Some foods with proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. • Some foods with proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. • Some foods with proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  208. 208. • Some foods with proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. • Some foods with proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  210. 210. • Some foods with proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  211. 211.  Draw a dog growling Grr…. Grrr… G- r- r- r- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  212. 212.  The four important roles of proteins. Grrr… G- r- r- r- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  213. 213.  The four important roles of proteins. Grrr… G-Growth r- r- r- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  214. 214.  The four important roles of proteins. Grrr… G-Growth r-Repair r- r- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  215. 215.  The four important roles of proteins. Grrr… G-Growth r-Repair r-Reproduction r- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  216. 216.  The four important roles of proteins. Grrr… G-Growth r-Repair r-Reproduction r-Regulate Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  217. 217.  There are also structural proteins.  Make list next to stick figure Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  218. 218.  Hair is a protein
  219. 219.  Enzymes: Proteins act as enzymes, which are important in making chemical reactions happen in cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  220. 220.  Fingernails Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  221. 221.  Skin Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222.  Muscles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  223. 223.  Muscles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  224. 224.  Muscles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  225. 225.  Muscles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  226. 226.  Muscles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  227. 227.  Muscles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  228. 228.  Muscles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  229. 229.  Cartilage Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  230. 230.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  231. 231.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  232. 232.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  233. 233.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  234. 234.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  235. 235.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  236. 236.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  237. 237.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  238. 238.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  239. 239.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  240. 240.  Ligaments and tendons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  241. 241.  Eyes / cornea Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  242. 242.  Antibodies: Protect from disease Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  243. 243.  Antibodies: Protect from disease Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  244. 244. • Proteins are very important to the human body.
  245. 245. • Proteins are very important to the human body. • Is your body getting enough protein?
  246. 246. • Proteins are very important to the human body. • Is your body getting enough protein?
  247. 247. • Proteins are very important to the human body. • Is your body getting enough protein?
  248. 248. • Video Link (Optional): Structure of Proteins – How things in are body shaped correctly? – Video starts slow but stick with it. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w- ctkPUUpUc Learn more about the important role of proteins at… http://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/Contexts/Uniquely-Me/Science- Ideas-and-Concepts/Role-of-proteins-in-the-body
  249. 249. • You should be close to this question in your bundled homework.
  250. 250. • You should be close to this question in your bundled homework.
  251. 251. • What is our next molecule of life? – What other agenda will I address? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  252. 252.  Lipid – C H O (Fatty acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  253. 253. • Lipid – C H O (Fatty acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  254. 254. • Lipid – C H O (Fatty acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  255. 255. • Lipid – C H O (Fatty acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  256. 256. • Lipid – C H O (Fatty acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  257. 257. • Lipid – C H O (Fatty acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  258. 258. • Lipid – C H O (Fatty acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  259. 259. • Lipid – C H O (Fatty acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  260. 260. • Lipid – C H O (Fatty acid) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  261. 261. • You can also complete this question.
  262. 262. • Please draw a stick figure and provide information about specific proteins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  263. 263.  Lipids (AKA-Fats) They store energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  264. 264.  Cell membranes are made of a type of structural lipid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  265. 265.  Cell membranes are made of a type of structural lipid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  266. 266.  Chlorophyll, which is important in photosynthesis, is a lipid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  267. 267. • What is this lipid shown below?
  268. 268. • Ear wax is a lipid. It immobilizes materials from getting stuck in your ear canal.
  269. 269.  Body fat is a good thing, it provides your body with extra energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  270. 270. • Not enough body fat can lead to a number of serious health effects. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  271. 271. • However, too much body fat can also lead to a number of adverse health effects. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  272. 272. • Heart disease is a very real and dangerous problem. – Video! (Optional) Shows how plaque build occurs and leads to a heart attack. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcNYxegDXa8 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  273. 273. • Video Link! (Optional) Khan Academy – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wre2WRPiFI &feature=related
  274. 274. • Bacon drawing Contest (5 min) Must label the fat as a lipid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  275. 275.  Sex hormones, such as testosterone and estrogen are made of lipids. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  276. 276.  Sex hormones, such as testosterone and estrogen are made of lipids. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  277. 277.  Sex hormones, such as testosterone and estrogen are made of lipids. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  278. 278.  Sex hormones, such as testosterone and estrogen are made of lipids. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  279. 279.  Sex hormones, such as testosterone and estrogen are made of lipids. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  280. 280. • Video Link! (Optional) – Diagramming a lipid. – Explains saturated, unsaturated, and trans fats at a molecular level. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xF_LK9pnL0&feat ure=relmfu Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  281. 281. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  282. 282.  Saturated Fats  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  283. 283. • SATURATED FATS – These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels ("bad cholesterol"). – Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. – Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. – They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  284. 284. • SATURATED FATS – These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels ("bad cholesterol"). – Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. – Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. – They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  285. 285. • SATURATED FATS – These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels ("bad cholesterol"). – Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. – Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. – They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  286. 286. • SATURATED FATS – These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels ("bad cholesterol"). – Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. – Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. – They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  287. 287. • SATURATED FATS – These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels ("bad cholesterol"). – Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. – Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. – They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  288. 288. • SATURATED FATS – These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels ("bad cholesterol"). – Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. – Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. – They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  289. 289. “What is bogus from the list on the next slide?”
  290. 290. • SATURATED FATS and the bogus one is… A.) These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels ("bad cholesterol"). B.) Saturated fat should be limited to 90% of calories. C.) Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. D.) They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • E.) (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  291. 291. • SATURATED FATS and the bogus one is… A.) These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels ("bad cholesterol"). B.) Saturated fat should be limited to 90% of calories. C.) Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. D.) They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • E.) (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  292. 292. • SATURATED FATS and the bogus one is… A.) These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels ("bad cholesterol"). B.) Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. C.) Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. D.) They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • E.) (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  293. 293. • SATURATED FATS and the bogus one is… A.) These are the biggest dietary cause of high HDL levels (“good cholesterol"). B.) Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. C.) Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. D.) They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • E.) (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  294. 294. • SATURATED FATS and the bogus one is… A.) These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels (“bad cholesterol"). B.) Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. C.) Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. D.) They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • E.) (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  295. 295. • SATURATED FATS and the bogus one is… A.) These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels (“bad cholesterol"). B.) Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. C.) Saturated fats are found in plant products such as spinach, lettuce, yams, corn, wheat and bread. D.) They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • E.) (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  296. 296. • SATURATED FATS and the bogus one is… A.) These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels (“bad cholesterol"). B.) Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. C.) Saturated fats are found in plant products such as spinach, lettuce, yams, corn, wheat and bread. D.) They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • E.) (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  297. 297. • SATURATED FATS and the bogus one is… A.) These are the biggest dietary cause of high LDL levels (“bad cholesterol"). B.) Saturated fat should be limited to 10% of calories. C.) Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. D.) They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. • E.) (Note: Most other vegetable oils contain unsaturated fat and are more healthy.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  298. 298. “Get back to learning about fats!”
  299. 299.  Unsaturated fat  (just a bit however) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  300. 300. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  301. 301. • Unsaturated Fats: – Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. – Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. • The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) – There are two types of unsaturated fats: • Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. • Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  302. 302. • Unsaturated Fats: – Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. – Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. • The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) – There are two types of unsaturated fats: • Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. • Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  303. 303. • Unsaturated Fats: – Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. – Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. • The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) – There are two types of unsaturated fats: • Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. • Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  304. 304. • Unsaturated Fats: – Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. – Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. • The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) – There are two types of unsaturated fats: • Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. • Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  305. 305. • Unsaturated Fats: – Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. – Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. • The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) – There are two types of unsaturated fats: • Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. • Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  306. 306. • Unsaturated Fats: – Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. – Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. • The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) – There are two types of unsaturated fats: • Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. • Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  307. 307. • Unsaturated Fats: – Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. – Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. • The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) – There are two types of unsaturated fats: • Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. • Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  308. 308. • Unsaturated Fats: A.) Increase blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. B.) Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. C.) The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) D.) There are two types of unsaturated fats: E.) Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. F.) Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  309. 309. • Unsaturated Fats: and the bogus one is… A.) Increase blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. B.) Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. C.) The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) D.) There are two types of unsaturated fats: E.) Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. F.) Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  310. 310. • Unsaturated Fats: and the bogus one is… A.) Increase blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. B.) Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. C.) The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) D.) There are two types of unsaturated fats: E.) Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. F.) Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  311. 311. • Unsaturated Fats: and the bogus one is… A.) Decrease blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. B.) Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. C.) The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) D.) There are two types of unsaturated fats: E.) Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. F.) Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  312. 312. • Unsaturated Fats: A.) Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. B.) Unsaturated fats do not have a lot of calories, so you do not need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. C.) The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) D.) There are two types of unsaturated fats: E.) Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. F.) Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  313. 313. • Unsaturated Fats: and the bogus one is… A.) Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. B.) Unsaturated fats do not have a lot of calories, so you do not need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. C.) The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) D.) There are two types of unsaturated fats: E.) Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. F.) Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  314. 314. • Unsaturated Fats: and the bogus one is… A.) Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. B.) Unsaturated fats do not have a lot of calories, so you do not need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. C.) The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) D.) There are two types of unsaturated fats: E.) Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. F.) Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  315. 315. • Unsaturated Fats: and the bogus one is… A.) Help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. B.) Unsaturated fats have a lot of calories so you need to limit them. Most, but not all liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. C.) The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) D.) There are two types of unsaturated fats: E.) Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. F.) Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  316. 316. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  317. 317.  Trans Fats Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  318. 318.  Trans Fats  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  319. 319.  Trans Fats  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  320. 320.  Trans Fats  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  321. 321.  Trans Fats  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  322. 322. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  323. 323. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS – These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  324. 324. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS – These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) – Raises LDL levels. They can also lower HDL levels ("good cholesterol"). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  325. 325. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS – These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) – Raises LDL levels. They can also lower HDL levels ("good cholesterol"). – Trans-fatty acids are found in fried foods, commercial baked goods (donuts, cookies, crackers), processed foods, and margarines. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  326. 326. “Remember Me.” Find the bogus..
  327. 327. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS A.)These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) B.) Raises HDL levels (Good cholesterol) and lower LDL “bad cholesterol”. C.)Trans-fatty acids are found in fried foods, commercial baked goods (donuts, cookies, crackers), processed foods, and margarines. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  328. 328. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS A.)These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) B.) Raises HDL levels (Good cholesterol) and lower LDL “bad cholesterol”. C.)Trans-fatty acids are found in fried foods, commercial baked goods (donuts, cookies, crackers), processed foods, and margarines. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  329. 329. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS A.)These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) B.) Raises LDL levels (“bad cholesterol). They can also lower HDL levels ("good cholesterol"). C.)Trans-fatty acids are found in fried foods, commercial baked goods (donuts, cookies, crackers), processed foods, and margarines. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  330. 330. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS A.) These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) B.) Raises LDL levels. They can also lower HDL levels ("good cholesterol"). C.) Trans-fatty acids are found in fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, canola, olive and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  331. 331. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS A.) These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) B.) Raises LDL levels. They can also lower HDL levels ("good cholesterol"). C.) Trans-fatty acids are found in fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, canola, olive and soybean oils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  332. 332. • TRANS FATTY ACIDS A.) These fats form when vegetable oil hardens (a process called hydrogenation) B.) Raises LDL levels. They can also lower HDL levels ("good cholesterol"). C.) Trans-fatty acids are found in fried foods, commercial baked goods (donuts, cookies, crackers), processed foods, and margarines. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  333. 333. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  334. 334. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  335. 335. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  336. 336. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated  – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  337. 337. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  338. 338. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  339. 339. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  340. 340. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated  – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  341. 341. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  342. 342. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated  – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  343. 343. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  344. 344. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated  – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  345. 345. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  346. 346. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated  – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  347. 347. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  348. 348. • Which type of fat is the picture below? – Saturated – Unsaturated – Trans Fatty Acid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  349. 349. • You should be close to this question in your bundled homework.
  350. 350. Learn more about lipids (fats) at… http://www.chem4kids.com/files/bio_lipids.html
  351. 351. • Activity! Building Molecules of Life and separating common foods into carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. – Worksheet / Building Instructions provided in the activities folder. PowerPoint version provided next few slides. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  352. 352. • Activity! Whiteboards, Worksheet, and Molecule Set. Oxygen
  353. 353. • Please build a carbohydrate. CHO • Carbon, Hydrogen, Oxygen (1:2:1)
  354. 354. • Please build a lipid. CHo
  355. 355. • Please build a Protein. sONCH
  356. 356. • Nucleic Acids. PONCH Make one from below.
  357. 357.  Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  358. 358. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  359. 359. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  360. 360. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  361. 361. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  362. 362. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  363. 363. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  364. 364. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  365. 365. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  366. 366. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  367. 367. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  368. 368. • Nucleic Acids – P O N C H (Nucleotide) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  369. 369. • You can also complete this question.
  370. 370.  Nucleic acids include DNA, which carries genetic information, and RNA, which translates that information into proteins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  371. 371. • DNA – - – - – - – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  372. 372. • DNA: Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  373. 373. • Shape is called double helix. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  374. 374. • DNA is a polymer (Long molecule). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  375. 375. • The units of DNA are called nucleotides. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  376. 376. • DNA has the information for our cells to make proteins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  377. 377. • DNA through transcription makes mRNA. – mRNA = Messenger RNA. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  378. 378. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  379. 379. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  380. 380. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  381. 381. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  382. 382. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  383. 383. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  384. 384. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  385. 385. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  386. 386. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  387. 387. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  388. 388. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  389. 389. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  390. 390. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  391. 391. • . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  392. 392. DNA, the smartest molecule in existence. Learn more at… http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/0/22199991
  393. 393. • Music Video Link! Hip Hip Hooray for DNA – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LIZG6iicLU
  394. 394. • Activity-Building The Molecules of Life – You are required to build each of the molecules of life. – Each table has a different molecule. – Please build each molecule – Notice the number of bonds each form based on their atomic structure - Carbon (4) and Hydrogen (1) – Groups will be graded for accuracy and group work. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  395. 395. • Build a Carbohydrate. – Yellow = Hydrogen – Black = Carbon – Red = Oxygen Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  396. 396. • Build an Amino Acid. The building blocks of proteins. – Yellow = Hydrogen – Black = Carbon – Red = Oxygen – Blue = Nitrogen Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  397. 397. • Build a Lipid. – Yellow = Hydrogen – Black = Carbon – Red = Oxygen Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  398. 398. • Build an Amino Acid. The building blocks of proteins. – Yellow = Hydrogen – Black = Carbon – Red = Oxygen – Blue = Nitrogen Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  399. 399. • Try and create one of nitrogen base. (Thymine) – Yellow = Hydrogen – Black = Carbon – Red = Oxygen – Blue = Nitrogen Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  400. 400. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  401. 401. • Quiz 1-10 Carbohydrate, Protein, Lipid, Nucleic Acid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about the molecules of life at… http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/bionet/biol115/t2_basics_of_life/l esson2.htm
  402. 402. • Answers 1-10 Carbohydrate, Protein, Lipid, Nucleic Acid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  403. 403. “My name is Kevin bacon.”
  404. 404. “My name is Kevin bacon.” “Bacon has lots of lipids in them.”
  405. 405. • Activity! (Optional) If time allows. – Six degrees of Kevin Bacon. – Every actor or actress has a Bacon level. This is the lowest number of actors or actresses that can be connected to Kevin Bacon. – Called the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon. – Visit:http://oracleofbacon.org/ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  406. 406. • Nutrients of Life Available Sheet.
  407. 407. • You should now be able to complete this question in the bundled homework.
  408. 408. • You should now be able to complete this question in the bundled homework.
  409. 409. • You should now be able to complete this question in the bundled homework.
  410. 410. • You should now be able to complete this question in the bundled homework.
  411. 411. • You should now be able to complete this question in the bundled homework.
  412. 412. • You can now lightly color these pictures and provide informative text in the white space.
  413. 413. Atom Molecule Cell Organelle Cell Tissue Organ Organ System Individual orm ollows function Homeostasis: The ability of an organism or cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.regardless of outside conditions. Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. – Humans have some 75-100 Trillion Name the major bones shown below. Use your resource sheets •Long Bones •Flat Bones •Irregular Bones •Short Bones –Spongy Bone –Compact Bone Tendon Ligament Name these muscles
  414. 414. Atom Molecule Cell Organelle Cell Tissue Organ Organ System Individual orm ollows function Homeostasis: The ability of an organism or cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.regardless of outside conditions. Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. – Humans have some 75-100 Trillion Name the major bones shown below. Use your resource sheets •Long Bones •Flat Bones •Irregular Bones •Short Bones –Spongy Bone –Compact Bone Tendon Ligament Name these muscles
  415. 415. Atom Molecule Cell Organelle Cell Tissue Organ Organ System Individual orm ollows function Homeostasis: The ability of an organism or cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.regardless of outside conditions. Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. – Humans have some 75-100 Trillion Name the major bones shown below. Use your resource sheets •Long Bones •Flat Bones •Irregular Bones •Short Bones –Spongy Bone –Compact Bone Tendon Ligament Name these muscles
  416. 416. Atom Molecule Cell Organelle Cell Tissue Organ Organ System Individual orm ollows function Homeostasis: The ability of an organism or cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.regardless of outside conditions. Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. – Humans have some 75-100 Trillion Name the major bones shown below. Use your resource sheets •Long Bones •Flat Bones •Irregular Bones •Short Bones –Spongy Bone –Compact Bone Tendon Ligament Name these muscles
  417. 417. • Try and guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. Please raise your hand when you think you know. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  418. 418. “Stay away from consuming too much Trans Fats”
  419. 419. • Try and guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. Please raise your hand when you think you know. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  420. 420. DON’T FORGET YOUR FIBER “Don’t forget your fiber.”
  421. 421. • Molecules of Life. (Optional) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWf2jcznLsY Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  422. 422. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tstPlease visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet.
  423. 423. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p=1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
  424. 424. Human Body Unit Part IV/XIII
  425. 425. Bundled homework package, lesson notes, worksheets, review games, and much more on the full unit.

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