• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very
important and should be recorded in your
science journal.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan...
• RED SLIDE: These are notes that are
very important and should be recorded in
your science journal.
• BLACK SLIDE: Pay at...
-Please make notes legible and use indentations
when appropriate.
-Example of indent.
-Skip a line between topics
-Don’t s...
• http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
 Area of Focus: Magnification
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
 Area of Focus: Magnification
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
 Magnification: The act of expanding
something in apparent size.
 The object doesn’t change in size.
Copyright © 2010 Ry...
 Magnification: The act of expanding
something in apparent size.
 The object doesn’t change in size.
Copyright © 2010 Ry...
 De-magnification: To make something
smaller in appearance.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
 De-magnification: To make something
smaller in appearance.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
 De-magnification: To make something
smaller in appearance.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• How is magnification useful?
– In what applications do we use it.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• The following slides will show some of the
various applications of magnification.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Eyeglasses to help us see.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• To help us see smaller things in science
class. (Education)
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• To see the very small (Scientific)
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Surgical and medical applications.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Surgical and medical applications.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
“Hoot” “Hoot” “Did
anybody see me
hiding.”
• Surgical and medical applications.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Crime investigation
– Two different bullets shot from the same gun
shown below.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Crime investigation
– Two different bullets shot from the same gun
shown below.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which of the bills below is counterfeit?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• This is the counterfeit bill
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Military use.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Space exploration (telescope)
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• The Movies
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Cameras and recording devices.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Magnification works because of light.
Without light, you would not be able to see
any image, magnified or not.
Copyright...
• Activity! Hand Lens
– Use a hand lens to practice focusing on a US
$1 dollar bill. Record two pictures of neat
things th...
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Picture of microprint on 20$ Bill.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Convex lens: A convex lens bends the light
that goes through it toward a focal point.
e
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Convex lens: A convex lens bends the light
that goes through it toward a focal point.
– The light spreads out again past...
• Although magnification is possible with only
one lens, it also can be achieved by using
more than one.
Copyright © 2010 ...
• Although magnification is possible with only
one lens, it also can be achieved by using
more than one.
Copyright © 2010 ...
• Although magnification is possible with only
one lens, it also can be achieved by using
more than one.
Copyright © 2010 ...
• Although magnification is possible with only
one lens, it also can be achieved by using
more than one.
Copyright © 2010 ...
• A magnifying lens uses a single lens to
magnify the specimen.
– Focusing can occur by moving the object or the
lens.
Cop...
• A magnifying lens uses a single lens to
magnify the specimen.
– Focusing can occur by moving the object or the
lens. Cha...
Just a little bit about light…
• Magnification deals with light.
– Light travels in a straight line (transmission)
until it hits something.
Copyright © 2...
• Magnification deals with light.
– Light travels in a straight line (transmission)
until it hits something.
– Light can d...
• Activity! Disappearing Coin.
– Place a coin under an empty glass and cover
with a plate or board and observe.
– Try agai...
• Refraction: The bending of a wave when it
enters a medium where its speed is
changed.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Refraction: The bending of a wave when it
enters a medium where its speed is
changed.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Refraction, Diffraction,
Reflection. Learn more:
http://www.msnucleus.org/m
embership/html/k-
6/as/physics/5/asp5_2a.htm
• An eagle must compensate for refraction
when catching a fish.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Light can be bent by gravity.
White Light
White Light
Dispersion
• Wave reflection.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Wave reflection.
– Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves
change directions as a result of "bouncing off"
a surface...
• Wave reflection.
– Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves
change directions as a result of "bouncing off"
a surface...
• Wave reflection.
– Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves
change directions as a result of "bouncing off"
a surface...
– Diffraction: Bending of waves.
– Scattering: Bouncing off of something
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Light waves could be absorbed by the object,
in which case its energy is converted to heat
Light waves could be absorbed by the object,
in which case its energy is converted to heat
Light waves could be absorbed by the object,
in which case its energy is converted to heat
Light waves could be absorbed by the object,
in which case its energy is converted to heat
Light waves could be absorbed by the object,
in which case its energy is converted to heat
Light waves could be absorbed by the object,
in which case its energy is converted to heat
Light waves could be absorbed by the object,
in which case its energy is converted to heat
• Why is the sky blue?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• The sky is blue because…
– Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms.
– Red light (long wavelength) from the sun
passes by Nit...
• The sky is blue because…
– Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms.
– Red light (long wavelength) from the sun
passes by Nit...
• The sky is blue because…
– Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms.
– Red light (long wavelength) from the sun
passes by Nit...
• The sky is blue because…
– Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms.
– Red light (long wavelength) from the sun
passes by Nit...
• The sky is blue because…
– Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms.
– Red light (long wavelength) from the sun
passes by Nit...
• The sky is blue because…
– Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms.
– Red light (long wavelength) from the sun
passes by Nit...
Shorter wave-lengths
longer wave-lengths
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which letter represents the blue light that
we see, and which represents the red light?
A
B
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Mur...
• Answer! B represents the smaller wave
length of light scattering off of N2 and O2.
A
B
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Why then, are sunsets red, yellow, and
orange?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Answer! The sun is not directly overhead
and passes across the atmosphere. The
blue light is scattered out, leaving the
...
• Wave interference.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Wave interference.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Ripple tank simulator.
• http://www.falstad.com/ripple/
• Identify some properties of waves, include
reflection, interfe...
• Video! Ripple Tank (Interference)
– http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-
8a61G8Hvi0
• Lens: A transparent optical device used to
converge or diverge transmitted light.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Lens: A transparent optical device used to
converge or diverge transmitted light.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Which ...
• Lens: A transparent optical device used to
converge or diverge transmitted light.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Diverg...
• Lens: A transparent optical device used to
converge or diverge transmitted light.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Diverg...
• Lens: A transparent optical device used to
converge or diverge transmitted light.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Conver...
• Lens: A transparent optical device used to
converge or diverge transmitted light.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Conver...
• Please sketch the following.
– Please use a straight edge.
– Complete diagrams of both from the videos.
• Video Link! Concave and Convex Lens
– http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPvvjjnKs4k&f
eature=results_main&playnext=1&list=P...
• Activity! Sketching Converging light.
(Optional)
– Please view the video and sketch / copy what
you see. – Note: this is...
• Video Link! Ray Box and Optics.
– http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gyGfiiC3
ms&feature=related
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. M...
• Activity Simulator:
• http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/geo
metric-optics
• Activity! Converging light sketch / lens
– http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrNB_BacI
kA&feature=related
– Sketch this sta...
• Activity! Diverging light sketch / lens
– http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fUygzGO3b4
&feature=related
– Sketch this star...
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Which lens is converging light?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Which lens is converging light?
Convex
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Convex
Concave
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Convex
Concave
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Convex
Concave
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
“Get out of
my cave.”
• Concavo-convex
• Concavo-convex
• Which a concave polygon?
• Which a concave polygon?
• Which a concave polygon?
Learn more about light, optics, and lenses at:
lhttp://www.nightlase.com.au/education/optics/le...
• Adjusting the lens, adjusts the focus and
will allow you to see clearly.
• Adjusting the lens, adjusts the focus and
will allow you to see clearly.
• Adjusting the lens, adjusts the focus and
will allow you to see clearly.
• Activity!
– On next slide teacher minimizes out of slide show.
– Teachers assists the students as they drag focal
point ...
• Activity! Place the four dots on the focal point of
each picture below.
• Activity! Place the four dots on the focal point of
each picture below.
• Activity! Place the four dots on the focal point of
each picture below.
• Answer:
Reminder to teacher!
Reset focal points for next group.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which is double convex?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which is double convex?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which is double concave?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Concave Mirror
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Convex mirror
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which mirror is convex, and which mirror
is concave?
• Which mirror is convex, and which mirror
is concave?
• Which mirror is convex, and which mirror
is concave?
• Which mirror is convex, and which mirror
is concave?
• Which mirror is convex, and which mirror
is concave?
• For those who wear eyeglasses, the shape
of the lens in the eye glasses help to correct
the focus point.
Copyright © 201...
• These eyeglasses are double_________?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• These eyeglasses are double_________?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Concave
• These eyeglasses are double_________?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Concave
• Nearsighted
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Nearsighted
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Farsighted
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Farsighted
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which is nearsightedness, and which is far
sightedness?
Farsightedness
Farsightedness Nearsightedness
Farsightedness Nearsightedness
• Is this person nearsighted or far sighted?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Answer! Farsighted
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Answer! Farsighted
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Activity! Vision test. Second from the
bottom row from the back of the room.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Hubble Space Telescope.
• Raise your hand when you think you know
the picture beneath the boxes.
– You only get one guess.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P...
• Activity! Stations Carousel.
– Lens types, focal points, and color paddles.
– 5 minutes at each station. Total of 6 stat...
• Demonstration and Activity! Riv Ray Box.
– (Optional Activity) Simulator next slide.
– Each table needs to adjust the le...
• Activity! Lens Optics Simulation
– http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/geometric-
optics
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Mur...
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which microscope should be used to view
a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a
dead cell?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. M...
• Which microscope should be used to view
a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a
dead cell?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. M...
• Which microscope should be used to view
a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a
dead cell?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. M...
• Which microscope should be used to view
a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a
dead cell?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. M...
• Which microscope should be used to view
a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a
dead cell?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. M...
• Which microscope should be used to view
a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a
dead cell?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. M...
• Which microscope should be used to view
a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a
dead cell?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. M...
• Which device should we use to look at the
specimen on the left?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• The device in the middle, called a
stereoscope is used for large objects?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which device should we use to look at the
specimen on the left?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• The microscope on the right is a compound
light microscope and is used for very small
specimens that light can pass thro...
• This is stereoscopic microscope.
• It looks at things in which light cannot pass
like a bumble bee.
– Lets you see the i...
• This is stereoscopic microscope.
• It looks at things in which light cannot pass
like a bumble bee.
– Lets you see the i...
• This is stereoscopic microscope.
• It looks at things in which light cannot pass
like a bumble bee.
– Lets you see the i...
• This is a light microscope.
– It lets you magnify images that light can pass
through. Uses a glass slide and cover slip....
• This is a light microscope.
– It lets you magnify images that light can pass
through. Uses a glass slide and cover slip....
• This is a light microscope.
– It lets you magnify images that light can pass
through. Uses a glass slide and coverslip.
...
Glass Slide
Glass Slide Coverslip
Glass Slide Coverslip
Drop of water
for a wet mount
slide.
Glass Slide Coverslip
Drop of water
for a wet mount
slide.
Learn more about wet mount slides, oil immersion, and more
at…
...
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• You do not put large objects under a light
microscope such as a rock, pencil, finger,
etc.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murp...
• You do not put large objects under a light
microscope such as a rock, pencil, finger,
etc.
– Specimens need to be incred...
• You do not put large objects under a light
microscope such as a rock, pencil, finger,
etc.
– Specimens need to be incred...
• This is an electron microscope.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• This is an electron microscope. It can
magnify specimens much smaller than a
light, or stereoscope,
Copyright © 2010 Rya...
• This is an electron microscope. It can
magnify specimens much smaller than a
light, or stereoscope, but doesn’t usually
...
• This is an electron microscope. It can
magnify specimens much smaller than a
light, or stereoscope, but doesn’t usually
...
• Scanning electron microscope.
– Lets you see small specimens in 3-D.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Video! A look at the atoms in steel. Look
closely to get a good look atom .
– May use an electron microscope.
– http://...
• Head of a flea under an electron
microscope.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• What is this a picture of?
– Hint, It’s on your homework.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• What is this a picture of?
– Hint, It’s on your homework.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• What is this a picture of?
– Hint, It’s on your homework.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• What is this a picture of? Hint, It’s on your
lunch?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• What is this a picture of? Hint, It’s on your
lunch? Grain of Table Salt.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• What is this a picture of? Hint- It may be
on your person.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• What is this a picture of? Hint- It may be
on your person.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• What is this a picture of? Hint- It may be
on your person.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• What is this a picture of? Hint- It may be
on your person. Answer: Velcro
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Mascara brush.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Diatom (Protista) Shell made of glass.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Cross section of a leaf.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Clam gills.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Eye of a fruit fly.
• Eye of a fruit fly.
• Variety of Pollen Grains.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Human hair.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Toilet Paper
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Electric Guitar String.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Nylon stockings.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Microorganisms on a sheet of paper.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Head
of
Tick
• Aquatic skin parasites on fish.
• Reptile Scales.
• Microscopic Spider.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Dust mite.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Dust mite. If you are allergic to dust, it is
most likely the feces of the dust mite.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Dust mite. If you are allergic to dust, it is
most likely the feces of the dust mite.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Porcupine quill.
• Claw of Black Widow Spider
• Video! (Optional) More Magnified Images.
– http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIOOLXbwWME
• Activity! Link to a quick activity that has
students match specimens to the correct
term using a virtual electron micros...
• An atomic force microscope lets you see
all the way to the atom.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Quiz! Parts of the Microscope.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• This is a quiz on something you haven’t
been taught.
• This is a quiz on something you haven’t
been taught.
• This is a quiz on something you haven’t
been taught.
“This is unfair!”
• This is a quiz on something you haven’t
been taught.
– You can get an easy 100% if you use logic.
• Please record the following word bank 1-14
of the terms for the quiz.
Base, Eyepiece, Light Source, Arm, Body Tube,
Stag...
Use the word bank
and logic to match
the words to the
picture?
• Quiz Sheet Available.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Base, Eyepiece, Light Source, Arm, Body
Tube, Stage, Stage Clips, Coarse Adjustment
Knob, ...
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Body Tube
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Stage Clips
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Stage Clips
Diaphragm
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P...
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Stage Clips
Diaphragm
Light Source
Copyright ...
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Stage Clips
Diaphragm
Light Source
Eyepiece
C...
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Stage Clips
Diaphragm
Light Source
Eyepiece
A...
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Stage Clips
Diaphragm
Light Source
Eyepiece
A...
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Stage Clips
Diaphragm
Light Source
Eyepiece
A...
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Stage Clips
Diaphragm
Light Source
Eyepiece
A...
Body Tube
Revolving Nose Piece
Low Power lens
Med Power lens
High Power lens
Stage Clips
Diaphragm
Light Source
Eyepiece
A...
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• When carrying a microscope, carry it by
the arm, and have one hand under the
base.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• When carrying a microscope, carry it by
the arm, and have one hand under the
base.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Watch out for cords that hang off of the
table waiting to be stepped on and pulling
the microscope to the ground.
Copyri...
• Watch out for cords that hang off of the
table waiting to be stepped on and pulling
the microscope to the ground.
– Wrap...
• Always lower the stage after use so the
gears are not strained.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Always lower the stage after use so the
gears are not strained.
– Remove any slide as well.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Mur...
• Always lower the stage after use so the
gears are not strained.
– Remove any slide as well.
– The finely tuned gears are...
• Remember dust cover for proper storage.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it
multiplies the object ten times.
– Low power is 4x
– Medium power is 10x
– High ...
• How many times larger is an image
magnified under low power.
10x times 4x =__________
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger.
• How many times magnified is a specimen
when looking at under medium and high...
• 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger.
• How many times magnified is a specimen
when looking at under medium and high...
• 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger.
• How many times magnified is a specimen
when looking at under medium and high...
• 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger.
• How many times magnified is a specimen
when looking at under medium and high...
• Using a Microscope Activity Sheet Available.
• Activity! Please create three circles using
a Petri-dish.
– Label the circles, low, medium and high
power.
Copyright © 2...
• Activity! Please create three circles using
a Petri-dish.
– Label the circles, low, medium and high
power.
Copyright © 2...
• Please make a wet-mount slide and place
on stage upon completion. Go no further!
– Pond water works well.
Copyright © 20...
• Please make a wet-mount slide and place
on stage upon completion. Go no further!
– Pond water works well.
Copyright © 20...
• To focus the microscope, place the slide
under the stage clips and adjust the
diaphragm so light passes through.
Copyrig...
• To focus the microscope, place the slide
under the stage clips and adjust the
diaphragm so light passes through.
Copyrig...
• To focus the microscope, place the slide
under the stage clips and adjust the
diaphragm so light passes through.
– Turn ...
• To focus the microscope, place the slide
under the stage clips and adjust the
diaphragm so light passes through.
– Turn ...
• To focus the microscope, place the slide
under the stage clips and adjust the
diaphragm so light passes through.
– Turn ...
• To focus the microscope, place the slide
under the stage clips and adjust the
diaphragm so light passes through.
– Turn ...
• To focus the microscope, place the slide
under the stage clips and adjust the
diaphragm so light passes through.
– Turn ...
• With the low power lens, gently turn the
coarse adjustment until the image comes
into focus.
– Once in focus, you can no...
• With the low power lens, gently turn the
coarse adjustment until the image comes
into focus.
– Once in focus, you can no...
• With the low power lens, gently turn the
coarse adjustment until the image comes
into focus.
– Once in focus, you can no...
• With the low power lens, gently turn the
coarse adjustment until the image comes
into focus.
– Once in focus, you can no...
• With the low power lens, gently turn the
coarse adjustment until the image comes
into focus.
– Once in focus, you can no...
• With the Medium power lens, gently turn
the coarse adjustment until the image
comes into focus.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P....
• With the Medium power lens, gently turn
the coarse adjustment until the image
comes into focus.
– Once in focus, you can...
• With the Medium power lens, gently turn
the coarse adjustment until the image
comes into focus.
– Once in focus, you can...
• With the Medium power lens, gently turn
the coarse adjustment until the image
comes into focus.
– Once in focus, you can...
• With the High power lens, gently turn the
fine adjustment until the image comes into
focus.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Mur...
• With the High power lens, gently turn the
fine adjustment until the image comes into
focus.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Mur...
• Do not use the coarse adjustment when
the microscope is using the high power
lens.
– This can break the glass slide and ...
• Do not use the coarse adjustment when
the microscope is using the high power
lens.
– This can break the glass slide and ...
• Video! Using a compound light microscope.
6 Minutes.
– http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-
w98KA8UqU
• Activity! Virtual Microscope Simulator.
– Each group should try to focus the letter “e”,
onion tip, bacteria, and cheek ...
• Activity! Using the microscope.
– Please place the letter “e” on a slide and put a
cover slip on. (lower case)
– Sketch ...
• Activity! Using the microscope.
– Try and move the “e” from right to left, and then
from top to down. What happened?
Cop...
• Activity!
– Practice your skills with prepared slides.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Activity!
– Pull out a hair and put it under the microscope
with a cover slip. Sketch your image.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan ...
• Activity! Using a depressed slide.
– Add one drop of pond water into the
depression on the slide, and add a cover slip.
...
• Activity! Use a Petri-dish to create a circle.
– Focus the object an create a sketch using a
stereoscopic microscope.
Co...
• Activity! Use a Petri-dish to create a circle.
– Focus the object an create a sketch using a
stereoscopic microscope.
Co...
• Activity! Use a Petri-dish to create a circle.
– Focus the object an create a sketch using a
stereoscopic microscope.
Co...
• Raise your hand when you think you know
the picture beneath the boxes.
– You only get one guess.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P...
• Raise your hand when you think you know
the picture beneath the boxes.
– You only get one guess.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P...
• Raise your hand when you think you know
the picture beneath the boxes.
– You only get one guess.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P...
• You should be on this page of your bundled
homework package. (Page 4)
• You can now add information to the white
spaces around the following.
– You can also color the sketches and text.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
Magnification:
The act of
expanding
something in
apparent size.
• “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and
Literacy Opportunity Worksheet
– Visit some of the many provided links or..
– Art...
• “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and
Literacy Opportunity Worksheet
– Visit some of the many provided links or..
– Art...
• http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
Areas of Focus within The Science Skills Unit:
Lab Safety, Lab Safety Equipment, Magnification, Microscopes,
Stereoscopes,...
• This PowerPoint is on small part of my Science Skills Unit. This unit
includes…
• A Four Part 2,000+ Slide PowerPoint pr...
• Please visit the links below to learn more
about each of the units in this curriculum
– These units take me about four y...
Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide
Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_In...
• The entire four year curriculum can be found at...
http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to
contact me with any...
http://www.teacherspaytea
chers.com/Product/Physical
-Science-Curriculum-
596485
http://www.teacherspayt
eachers.com/Produ...
• http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson
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Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson

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A 2000+ slide PowerPoint presentation from www.sciencepowerpoint.com becomes the roadmap for an amazing learning experience. Complete with homework package, built-in activities with directions, built-in quizzes, unit notes, follow along worksheets, answer keys, video links, review games, rubrics, and much more.
Also included are directions on how create a student version of the unit that is much like the teachers but missing the answer keys, quizzes, PowerPoint review games, hidden box challenges, owl, and surprises meant for the classroom. This is a great resource to distribute to your students and support professionals and will only take you a few minutes to create.
This is a great introductory unit that covers science topics associated with Lab Safety, Magnification, Base Units of the Metric System, Scientific Method, Inferences, and Observation Skills (See list below for more topics covered). This unit includes an interactive and engaging PowerPoint Presentation of 2000 slides with built in class notes (Red Slides), lab activities, project ideas, discussion questions, assessments (Quiz Wiz), and challenge questions with answers.
Text is in large print (32 font) and is placed at the top of each slide so it can seen and read from all angles of a classroom. A shade technique, as well as color coded text helps to increase student focus and allows teacher to control pace of the lessons. Also included is a 10 page assessment / bundled homework that chronologically follows the slideshow for nightly homework and end of the unit assessment, as well as a 9 page modified assessment. 14 pages of class notes with images are also included for students who require modifications, as well as answer keys to both of the assessments for support professionals, teachers, and home school parents. Several video links are provided and a slide within the slideshow cues teacher / parent when the videos are most relevant to play. Video shorts usually range from 2-7 minutes. One PowerPoint review game (125+ slides)is included. Answers to the PowerPoint review game are provided in PowerPoint form so students can self-assess. Lastly, several class games such as guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes, and the find the hidden owl somewhere within the slideshow are provided. Difficulty rating of 5 (Ten is most difficult)

Thank you for time and if you have any questions please feel free to contact me at www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com. Best wishes.
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

Sincerely,
Ryan Murphy M.Ed
Science PowerPoints

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Transcript of "Magnification PowerPoint, Microscopes, Science Lesson"

  1. 1. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  4. 4. -Please make notes legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label
  5. 5. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
  6. 6.  Area of Focus: Magnification Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7.  Area of Focus: Magnification Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8.  Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.  The object doesn’t change in size. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9.  Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.  The object doesn’t change in size. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10.  De-magnification: To make something smaller in appearance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11.  De-magnification: To make something smaller in appearance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12.  De-magnification: To make something smaller in appearance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13. • How is magnification useful? – In what applications do we use it. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. • The following slides will show some of the various applications of magnification. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15. • Eyeglasses to help us see. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. • To help us see smaller things in science class. (Education) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17. • To see the very small (Scientific) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18. • Surgical and medical applications. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  19. 19. • Surgical and medical applications. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Hoot” “Hoot” “Did anybody see me hiding.”
  20. 20. • Surgical and medical applications. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Crime investigation – Two different bullets shot from the same gun shown below. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. • Crime investigation – Two different bullets shot from the same gun shown below. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23. • Which of the bills below is counterfeit? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24. • This is the counterfeit bill Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. • Military use. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26. • Space exploration (telescope) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27. • The Movies Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • Cameras and recording devices. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • Magnification works because of light. Without light, you would not be able to see any image, magnified or not. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  30. 30. • Activity! Hand Lens – Use a hand lens to practice focusing on a US $1 dollar bill. Record two pictures of neat things that you find. – Try and find the hidden owl. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  33. 33. • Picture of microprint on 20$ Bill. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  34. 34. • Convex lens: A convex lens bends the light that goes through it toward a focal point. e Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35. • Convex lens: A convex lens bends the light that goes through it toward a focal point. – The light spreads out again past this focal point. (Image reverses) e e Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. • Although magnification is possible with only one lens, it also can be achieved by using more than one. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37. • Although magnification is possible with only one lens, it also can be achieved by using more than one. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • Although magnification is possible with only one lens, it also can be achieved by using more than one. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Although magnification is possible with only one lens, it also can be achieved by using more than one. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • A magnifying lens uses a single lens to magnify the specimen. – Focusing can occur by moving the object or the lens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • A magnifying lens uses a single lens to magnify the specimen. – Focusing can occur by moving the object or the lens. Changing the focal length. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. Just a little bit about light…
  43. 43. • Magnification deals with light. – Light travels in a straight line (transmission) until it hits something. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  44. 44. • Magnification deals with light. – Light travels in a straight line (transmission) until it hits something. – Light can do a few things such as be absorbed, reflected / scattered, interference. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  45. 45. • Activity! Disappearing Coin. – Place a coin under an empty glass and cover with a plate or board and observe. – Try again and this time fill the glass ¾ of the way with water and cover with plate or board.
  46. 46. • Refraction: The bending of a wave when it enters a medium where its speed is changed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • Refraction: The bending of a wave when it enters a medium where its speed is changed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. Refraction, Diffraction, Reflection. Learn more: http://www.msnucleus.org/m embership/html/k- 6/as/physics/5/asp5_2a.htm
  49. 49. • An eagle must compensate for refraction when catching a fish. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Light can be bent by gravity.
  51. 51. White Light
  52. 52. White Light Dispersion
  53. 53. • Wave reflection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • Wave reflection. – Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves change directions as a result of "bouncing off" a surface like a mirror. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55. • Wave reflection. – Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves change directions as a result of "bouncing off" a surface like a mirror. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56. • Wave reflection. – Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves change directions as a result of "bouncing off" a surface like a mirror. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. – Diffraction: Bending of waves. – Scattering: Bouncing off of something Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  59. 59. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  60. 60. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  61. 61. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  62. 62. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  63. 63. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  64. 64. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  65. 65. • Why is the sky blue? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  67. 67. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. Shorter wave-lengths longer wave-lengths Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. • Which letter represents the blue light that we see, and which represents the red light? A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • Answer! B represents the smaller wave length of light scattering off of N2 and O2. A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. • Why then, are sunsets red, yellow, and orange? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. • Answer! The sun is not directly overhead and passes across the atmosphere. The blue light is scattered out, leaving the longer reds, oranges, and yellows. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • Wave interference. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. • Wave interference. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • Ripple tank simulator. • http://www.falstad.com/ripple/ • Identify some properties of waves, include reflection, interference and diffraction (refraction?). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. • Video! Ripple Tank (Interference) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=- 8a61G8Hvi0
  81. 81. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is diverging light?
  83. 83. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Diverging Light
  84. 84. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Diverging Light
  85. 85. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Converging light
  86. 86. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Converging light
  87. 87. • Please sketch the following. – Please use a straight edge. – Complete diagrams of both from the videos.
  88. 88. • Video Link! Concave and Convex Lens – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPvvjjnKs4k&f eature=results_main&playnext=1&list=PL64DF19 09345AF984
  89. 89. • Activity! Sketching Converging light. (Optional) – Please view the video and sketch / copy what you see. – Note: this is difficult. – You will need a straight edge (ruler).
  90. 90. • Video Link! Ray Box and Optics. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gyGfiiC3 ms&feature=related Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. • Activity Simulator: • http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/geo metric-optics
  92. 92. • Activity! Converging light sketch / lens – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrNB_BacI kA&feature=related – Sketch this starting template (double convex)
  93. 93. • Activity! Diverging light sketch / lens – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fUygzGO3b4 &feature=related – Sketch this starting template (double concave)
  94. 94. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is converging light?
  98. 98. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is converging light?
  99. 99. Convex Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. Convex Concave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  101. 101. Convex Concave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102. Convex Concave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Get out of my cave.”
  103. 103. • Concavo-convex
  104. 104. • Concavo-convex
  105. 105. • Which a concave polygon?
  106. 106. • Which a concave polygon?
  107. 107. • Which a concave polygon? Learn more about light, optics, and lenses at: lhttp://www.nightlase.com.au/education/optics/lenses.htm
  108. 108. • Adjusting the lens, adjusts the focus and will allow you to see clearly.
  109. 109. • Adjusting the lens, adjusts the focus and will allow you to see clearly.
  110. 110. • Adjusting the lens, adjusts the focus and will allow you to see clearly.
  111. 111. • Activity! – On next slide teacher minimizes out of slide show. – Teachers assists the students as they drag focal point to the correct location using teachers computer.
  112. 112. • Activity! Place the four dots on the focal point of each picture below.
  113. 113. • Activity! Place the four dots on the focal point of each picture below.
  114. 114. • Activity! Place the four dots on the focal point of each picture below.
  115. 115. • Answer:
  116. 116. Reminder to teacher! Reset focal points for next group.
  117. 117. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  118. 118. • Which is double convex? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  119. 119. • Which is double convex? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  120. 120. • Which is double concave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  121. 121. • Concave Mirror Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  122. 122. • Convex mirror Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  123. 123. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  124. 124. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  125. 125. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  126. 126. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  127. 127. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  128. 128. • For those who wear eyeglasses, the shape of the lens in the eye glasses help to correct the focus point. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  129. 129. • These eyeglasses are double_________? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  130. 130. • These eyeglasses are double_________? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Concave
  131. 131. • These eyeglasses are double_________? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Concave
  132. 132. • Nearsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  133. 133. • Nearsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  134. 134. • Farsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  135. 135. • Farsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136. • Which is nearsightedness, and which is far sightedness?
  137. 137. Farsightedness
  138. 138. Farsightedness Nearsightedness
  139. 139. Farsightedness Nearsightedness
  140. 140. • Is this person nearsighted or far sighted? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141. • Answer! Farsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  142. 142. • Answer! Farsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143. • Activity! Vision test. Second from the bottom row from the back of the room. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. • Hubble Space Telescope.
  145. 145. • Raise your hand when you think you know the picture beneath the boxes. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  146. 146. • Activity! Stations Carousel. – Lens types, focal points, and color paddles. – 5 minutes at each station. Total of 6 stations. – Handout will be supplied with directions for all of the stations in the activities folder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147. • Demonstration and Activity! Riv Ray Box. – (Optional Activity) Simulator next slide. – Each table needs to adjust the lens types to focus on the dot taped to the table. – Must use a convex, and a concave lens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148. • Activity! Lens Optics Simulation – http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/geometric- optics Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  149. 149. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  150. 150. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  151. 151. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  152. 152. • Which microscope should be used to view a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a dead cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  153. 153. • Which microscope should be used to view a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a dead cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154. • Which microscope should be used to view a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a dead cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155. • Which microscope should be used to view a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a dead cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Which microscope should be used to view a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a dead cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • Which microscope should be used to view a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a dead cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158. • Which microscope should be used to view a bumble bee, living cell, and deep into a dead cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159. • Which device should we use to look at the specimen on the left? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  162. 162. • The device in the middle, called a stereoscope is used for large objects? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  163. 163. • Which device should we use to look at the specimen on the left? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  165. 165. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166. • The microscope on the right is a compound light microscope and is used for very small specimens that light can pass through. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167. • This is stereoscopic microscope. • It looks at things in which light cannot pass like a bumble bee. – Lets you see the image in 3D. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168. • This is stereoscopic microscope. • It looks at things in which light cannot pass like a bumble bee. – Lets you see the image in 3D. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169. • This is stereoscopic microscope. • It looks at things in which light cannot pass like a bumble bee. – Lets you see the image in 3D. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170. • This is a light microscope. – It lets you magnify images that light can pass through. Uses a glass slide and cover slip. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171. • This is a light microscope. – It lets you magnify images that light can pass through. Uses a glass slide and cover slip. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172. • This is a light microscope. – It lets you magnify images that light can pass through. Uses a glass slide and coverslip. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  173. 173. Glass Slide
  174. 174. Glass Slide Coverslip
  175. 175. Glass Slide Coverslip Drop of water for a wet mount slide.
  176. 176. Glass Slide Coverslip Drop of water for a wet mount slide. Learn more about wet mount slides, oil immersion, and more at… http://www.microbehunter.com/2010/08/13/making-a-wet- mount-microscope-slide/
  177. 177. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179. • You do not put large objects under a light microscope such as a rock, pencil, finger, etc. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180. • You do not put large objects under a light microscope such as a rock, pencil, finger, etc. – Specimens need to be incredibly thin and light must pass through. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181. • You do not put large objects under a light microscope such as a rock, pencil, finger, etc. – Specimens need to be incredibly thin and light must pass through. Uses Slides! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. • This is an electron microscope. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. • This is an electron microscope. It can magnify specimens much smaller than a light, or stereoscope, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • This is an electron microscope. It can magnify specimens much smaller than a light, or stereoscope, but doesn’t usually view live cells or specimens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • This is an electron microscope. It can magnify specimens much smaller than a light, or stereoscope, but doesn’t usually view live cells or specimens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Electron Microscopes.: Learn more at.. http://www.jic.ac. uk/microscopy/intr o_em.html
  186. 186. • Scanning electron microscope. – Lets you see small specimens in 3-D. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. • Video! A look at the atoms in steel. Look closely to get a good look atom . – May use an electron microscope. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNvdrpEmS48 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  188. 188. • Head of a flea under an electron microscope. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  189. 189. • What is this a picture of? – Hint, It’s on your homework. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190. • What is this a picture of? – Hint, It’s on your homework. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191. • What is this a picture of? – Hint, It’s on your homework. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192. • What is this a picture of? Hint, It’s on your lunch? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  193. 193. • What is this a picture of? Hint, It’s on your lunch? Grain of Table Salt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. • What is this a picture of? Hint- It may be on your person. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • What is this a picture of? Hint- It may be on your person. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. • What is this a picture of? Hint- It may be on your person. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197. • What is this a picture of? Hint- It may be on your person. Answer: Velcro Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  198. 198. • Mascara brush. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  199. 199. • Diatom (Protista) Shell made of glass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  200. 200. • Cross section of a leaf. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  201. 201. • Clam gills. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  202. 202. • Eye of a fruit fly.
  203. 203. • Eye of a fruit fly.
  204. 204. • Variety of Pollen Grains. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  205. 205. • Human hair. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. • Toilet Paper Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. • Electric Guitar String. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  208. 208. • Nylon stockings. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. • Microorganisms on a sheet of paper. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  210. 210. Head of Tick
  211. 211. • Aquatic skin parasites on fish.
  212. 212. • Reptile Scales.
  213. 213. • Microscopic Spider. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  214. 214. • Dust mite. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  215. 215. • Dust mite. If you are allergic to dust, it is most likely the feces of the dust mite. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  216. 216. • Dust mite. If you are allergic to dust, it is most likely the feces of the dust mite. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  217. 217. • Porcupine quill.
  218. 218. • Claw of Black Widow Spider
  219. 219. • Video! (Optional) More Magnified Images. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIOOLXbwWME
  220. 220. • Activity! Link to a quick activity that has students match specimens to the correct term using a virtual electron microscope. – http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonpl ans/interact/vemwindow.html
  221. 221. • An atomic force microscope lets you see all the way to the atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. • Quiz! Parts of the Microscope. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  223. 223. • This is a quiz on something you haven’t been taught.
  224. 224. • This is a quiz on something you haven’t been taught.
  225. 225. • This is a quiz on something you haven’t been taught. “This is unfair!”
  226. 226. • This is a quiz on something you haven’t been taught. – You can get an easy 100% if you use logic.
  227. 227. • Please record the following word bank 1-14 of the terms for the quiz. Base, Eyepiece, Light Source, Arm, Body Tube, Stage, Stage Clips, Coarse Adjustment Knob, Diaphragm, Revolving Nose piece, Fine Adjustment knob , Low Power Objective Lens, Medium Power Lens, High Power Lens -Note: Word document of word bank enclosed in the activities folder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  228. 228. Use the word bank and logic to match the words to the picture?
  229. 229. • Quiz Sheet Available.
  230. 230. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Base, Eyepiece, Light Source, Arm, Body Tube, Stage, Stage Clips, Coarse Adjustment Knob, Diaphragm, Revolving Nose piece, Fine Adjustment knob , Low Power Objective Lens, Medium Power Lens, High Power Lens
  231. 231. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  232. 232. Body Tube Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  233. 233. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  234. 234. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  235. 235. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  236. 236. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens
  237. 237. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens Stage Clips Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  238. 238. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens Stage Clips Diaphragm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  239. 239. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens Stage Clips Diaphragm Light Source Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  240. 240. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens Stage Clips Diaphragm Light Source Eyepiece Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  241. 241. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens Stage Clips Diaphragm Light Source Eyepiece Arm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  242. 242. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens Stage Clips Diaphragm Light Source Eyepiece Arm Stage Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  243. 243. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens Stage Clips Diaphragm Light Source Eyepiece Arm Stage Coarse Adj. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  244. 244. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens Stage Clips Diaphragm Light Source Eyepiece Arm Stage Coarse Adj. Fine Adj. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  245. 245. Body Tube Revolving Nose Piece Low Power lens Med Power lens High Power lens Stage Clips Diaphragm Light Source Eyepiece Arm Stage Coarse Adj. Fine Adj. Base Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  246. 246. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  247. 247. • When carrying a microscope, carry it by the arm, and have one hand under the base. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  248. 248. • When carrying a microscope, carry it by the arm, and have one hand under the base. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  249. 249. • Watch out for cords that hang off of the table waiting to be stepped on and pulling the microscope to the ground. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  250. 250. • Watch out for cords that hang off of the table waiting to be stepped on and pulling the microscope to the ground. – Wrap the cord around arm for storage. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  251. 251. • Always lower the stage after use so the gears are not strained. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  252. 252. • Always lower the stage after use so the gears are not strained. – Remove any slide as well. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  253. 253. • Always lower the stage after use so the gears are not strained. – Remove any slide as well. – The finely tuned gears are what make microscopes expensive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  254. 254. • Remember dust cover for proper storage. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  255. 255. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  256. 256. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  257. 257. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  258. 258. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  259. 259. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  260. 260. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  261. 261. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  262. 262. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  263. 263. • The eyepiece lens is 10x –That means it multiplies the object ten times. – Low power is 4x – Medium power is 10x – High power is 40x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  264. 264. • How many times larger is an image magnified under low power. 10x times 4x =__________ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  265. 265. • 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  266. 266. • 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger. • How many times magnified is a specimen when looking at under medium and high power? – 10x times 10x = ______ – 10x times 40x = ______ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  267. 267. • 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger. • How many times magnified is a specimen when looking at under medium and high power? – 10x times 10x = 100X – 10x times 40x = ______ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  268. 268. • 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger. • How many times magnified is a specimen when looking at under medium and high power? – 10x times 10x = 100X – 10x times 40x = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  269. 269. • 10x times 4x = 40x or forty times larger. • How many times magnified is a specimen when looking at under medium and high power? – 10x times 10x = 100X – 10x times 40x = 400x Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  270. 270. • Using a Microscope Activity Sheet Available.
  271. 271. • Activity! Please create three circles using a Petri-dish. – Label the circles, low, medium and high power. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  272. 272. • Activity! Please create three circles using a Petri-dish. – Label the circles, low, medium and high power. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  273. 273. • Please make a wet-mount slide and place on stage upon completion. Go no further! – Pond water works well. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  274. 274. • Please make a wet-mount slide and place on stage upon completion. Go no further! – Pond water works well. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  275. 275. • To focus the microscope, place the slide under the stage clips and adjust the diaphragm so light passes through. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  276. 276. • To focus the microscope, place the slide under the stage clips and adjust the diaphragm so light passes through. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  277. 277. • To focus the microscope, place the slide under the stage clips and adjust the diaphragm so light passes through. – Turn revolving nose piece to the low power lens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  278. 278. • To focus the microscope, place the slide under the stage clips and adjust the diaphragm so light passes through. – Turn revolving nose piece to the low power lens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is low power?
  279. 279. • To focus the microscope, place the slide under the stage clips and adjust the diaphragm so light passes through. – Turn revolving nose piece to the low power lens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is low power?
  280. 280. • To focus the microscope, place the slide under the stage clips and adjust the diaphragm so light passes through. – Turn revolving nose piece to the low power lens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is low power? Medium
  281. 281. • To focus the microscope, place the slide under the stage clips and adjust the diaphragm so light passes through. – Turn revolving nose piece to the low power lens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is low power? High Power
  282. 282. • With the low power lens, gently turn the coarse adjustment until the image comes into focus. – Once in focus, you can now use the revolving nosepiece to move the medium power lens into position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  283. 283. • With the low power lens, gently turn the coarse adjustment until the image comes into focus. – Once in focus, you can now use the revolving nosepiece to move the medium power lens into position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  284. 284. • With the low power lens, gently turn the coarse adjustment until the image comes into focus. – Once in focus, you can now use the revolving nosepiece to move the medium power lens into position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  285. 285. • With the low power lens, gently turn the coarse adjustment until the image comes into focus. – Once in focus, you can now use the revolving nosepiece to move the medium power lens into position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  286. 286. • With the low power lens, gently turn the coarse adjustment until the image comes into focus. – Once in focus, you can now use the revolving nosepiece to move the medium power lens into position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  287. 287. • With the Medium power lens, gently turn the coarse adjustment until the image comes into focus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  288. 288. • With the Medium power lens, gently turn the coarse adjustment until the image comes into focus. – Once in focus, you can now use the revolving nosepiece to move the high power lens into position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  289. 289. • With the Medium power lens, gently turn the coarse adjustment until the image comes into focus. – Once in focus, you can now use the revolving nosepiece to move the high power lens into position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  290. 290. • With the Medium power lens, gently turn the coarse adjustment until the image comes into focus. – Once in focus, you can now use the revolving nosepiece to move the high power lens into position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  291. 291. • With the High power lens, gently turn the fine adjustment until the image comes into focus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  292. 292. • With the High power lens, gently turn the fine adjustment until the image comes into focus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  293. 293. • Do not use the coarse adjustment when the microscope is using the high power lens. – This can break the glass slide and damage the microscope. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  294. 294. • Do not use the coarse adjustment when the microscope is using the high power lens. – This can break the glass slide and damage the microscope. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  295. 295. • Video! Using a compound light microscope. 6 Minutes. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X- w98KA8UqU
  296. 296. • Activity! Virtual Microscope Simulator. – Each group should try to focus the letter “e”, onion tip, bacteria, and cheek smear. – Focus on low, medium, and high power. • http://www.udel.edu/biology/ketcham/microscope/s cope.html
  297. 297. • Activity! Using the microscope. – Please place the letter “e” on a slide and put a cover slip on. (lower case) – Sketch the letter “e” on low, medium, and high power. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  298. 298. • Activity! Using the microscope. – Try and move the “e” from right to left, and then from top to down. What happened? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  299. 299. • Activity! – Practice your skills with prepared slides. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  300. 300. • Activity! – Pull out a hair and put it under the microscope with a cover slip. Sketch your image. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  301. 301. • Activity! Using a depressed slide. – Add one drop of pond water into the depression on the slide, and add a cover slip. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  302. 302. • Activity! Use a Petri-dish to create a circle. – Focus the object an create a sketch using a stereoscopic microscope. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  303. 303. • Activity! Use a Petri-dish to create a circle. – Focus the object an create a sketch using a stereoscopic microscope. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  304. 304. • Activity! Use a Petri-dish to create a circle. – Focus the object an create a sketch using a stereoscopic microscope. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  305. 305. • Raise your hand when you think you know the picture beneath the boxes. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  306. 306. • Raise your hand when you think you know the picture beneath the boxes. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  307. 307. • Raise your hand when you think you know the picture beneath the boxes. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  308. 308. • You should be on this page of your bundled homework package. (Page 4)
  309. 309. • You can now add information to the white spaces around the following. – You can also color the sketches and text.
  310. 310. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  311. 311. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  312. 312. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  313. 313. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  314. 314. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  315. 315. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  316. 316. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  317. 317. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  318. 318. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  319. 319. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  320. 320. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  321. 321. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  322. 322. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  323. 323. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  324. 324. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  325. 325. Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size.
  326. 326. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tst Please visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet
  327. 327. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to and NSTA) • http://www.sciencedaily.com/ • http://www.sciencemag.org/ • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
  328. 328. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
  329. 329. Areas of Focus within The Science Skills Unit: Lab Safety, Lab Safety Equipment, Magnification, Microscopes, Stereoscopes, Hand Lenses, Electron Microscopes, Compound Light Microscopes, Parts of a Compound Microscope, Metric System, International System of Units, Scientific Notation, Base Units, Mass, Volume, Density, Temperature, Time, Other SI Units, Observation, Inferences, Scientific Method, What is Science? What makes a good scientist? Types of Scientists, Branches of Science, Scientific Method, Hypothesis, Observations, Inferences. Hundreds of PowerPoint samples, the bundled homework package, unit notes, and much more can be previewed at… http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html
  330. 330. • This PowerPoint is on small part of my Science Skills Unit. This unit includes… • A Four Part 2,000+ Slide PowerPoint presentation full of class activities, review opportunities, project ideas, video linksm discussion questions, and much more. • 16 page bundled homework package that chronologically follows the PowerPoint slideshow. Modified version provided. • Worksheets, curriculum guide, Common Core worksheet. • 15 pages of unit notes with visuals for students who require assistance and support staff. • Many video and academic links • 1 PowerPoint review game with answer key. • Flashcards, rubrics, activity sheets, and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Me tric_Methods.html
  331. 331. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  332. 332. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  333. 333. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
  334. 334. http://www.teacherspaytea chers.com/Product/Physical -Science-Curriculum- 596485 http://www.teacherspayt eachers.com/Product/Life -Science-Curriculum- 601267 http://www.teacherspayt eachers.com/Product/Eart h-Science-Curriculum- 590950
  335. 335. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/

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