Light, Lenses, Waves, Physical Science Lesson PowerPoint

2,544
-1

Published on

This PowerPoint is one small part of the Matter, Energy, and the Environment Unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 3,500+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 12 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 20 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus: Matter, Dark Matter, Elements and Compounds, States of Matter, Solids, Liquids, Gases, Plasma, Law Conservation of Matter, Physical Change, Chemical Change, Gas Laws, Charles Law, Avogadro's Law, Ideal Gas Law, Pascal's Law, Archimedes Principle, Buoyancy, Seven Forms of Energy, Nuclear Energy, Electromagnet Spectrum, Waves / Wavelengths, Light (Visible Light), Refraction, Diffraction, Lens, Convex / Concave, Radiation, Electricity, Lightning, Static Electricity, Magnetism, Coulomb's Law, Conductors, Insulators, Semi-conductors, AC and DC current, Amps, Watts, Resistance, Magnetism, Faraday's Law, Compass, Relativity, Einstein, and E=MC2, Energy, First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics-Third Law of Thermodynamics, Industrial Processes, Environmental Studies, The 4 R's, Sustainability, Human Population Growth, Carrying Capacity, Green Design, Renewable Forms of Energy (The 11th Hour)

This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
8 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,544
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
8
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Light, Lenses, Waves, Physical Science Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • Wave reflection. – Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves change directions as a result of "bouncing off" a surface like a mirror. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Ice Melting Water Boiling Vapor GasT E M P Heat Added 
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • http://sciencepowerpoint.comWebsite Link:
  6. 6.  New Area of Focus: Energy
  7. 7.  New Area of Focus: Particles, Waves, and The Electromagnetic Spectrum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8.  Particle: Any of the basic units of matter and energy.  Ex. atom, proton, electron, or photon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9.  Particle: Any of the basic units of matter and energy.  Ex. atom, proton, electron, or photon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10. • Wave particle duality: The exhibition of both wavelike and particle like properties by a single entity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11. • Video Link! Slit experiment and particle and wave duality. (Optional) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DfPeprQ7oGc
  12. 12. • Video Link: Wave Particle Duality. (Optional) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_h4IoPJX Zw Part I – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_riIY- v2Ym8&feature=fvwrel Part II
  13. 13.  Area of Focus: Waves Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. • Activity! Make a stadium style wave around and around the classroom. – Everyone must get off of their seat.
  15. 15. • What is a wave?
  16. 16.  A wave: In physics – A wave is the movement up and down or back and forth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17.  A wave: In physics – A wave is the movement up and down or back and forth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18. • Wave: One of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid.
  19. 19.  The three types of waves:  Mechanical Waves: Move through a medium.  Water, Solid, Gas,  Electromagnetic Waves: Do that do not require a medium to move through.  Matter Waves: Electrons and Particles.
  20. 20.  The three types of waves:  Mechanical Wave: Moves through a medium.  Water, Solid, Gas,  Electromagnetic Waves: Do that do not require a medium to move through.  Matter Waves: Electrons and Particles.
  21. 21.  The three types of waves:  Mechanical Wave: Moves through a medium.  Water, Solid, Gas,  Electromagnetic Waves: Do that do not require a medium to move through.  Matter Waves: Electrons and Particles.
  22. 22.  The three types of waves:  Mechanical Wave: Moves through a medium.  Water, Solid, Gas,  Electromagnetic Waves: Do not require a medium to move through.  Matter Waves: Electrons and Particles.
  23. 23.  The three types of waves:  Mechanical Wave: Moves through a medium.  Water, Solid, Gas,  Electromagnetic Waves: Do not require a medium to move through.  Matter Waves: Electrons and Particles.
  24. 24.  The three types of waves:  Mechanical Wave: Moves through a medium.  Water, Solid, Gas,  Electromagnetic Waves: Do not require a medium to move through.  Matter Waves: Electrons and Particles. Learn more about waves at… http://library.thinkquest.org/10796/c h8/ch8.htm
  25. 25. • Can you name three types of waves below?
  26. 26. • Can you name three types of waves below?
  27. 27. • Can you name three types of waves below?
  28. 28. • Can you name three types of waves below?
  29. 29. • Can you name three types of waves below?
  30. 30. • Can you name three types of waves below?
  31. 31. • Can you name three types of waves below?
  32. 32. • Can you name three types of waves below?
  33. 33. • Can you name three types of waves below?
  34. 34. • Is this earthquake caused by matter waves or mechanical waves?
  35. 35. • Is this earthquake caused by matter waves or mechanical waves?
  36. 36. Symbol for wavelength
  37. 37. Amplitude
  38. 38. Amplitude
  39. 39. Amplitude
  40. 40. Amplitude
  41. 41. Amplitude
  42. 42. Amplitude
  43. 43. “OH NO!”
  44. 44. “OH NO!” “We have to do it again.”
  45. 45. Amplitude
  46. 46. Amplitude
  47. 47. Amplitude
  48. 48. Amplitude
  49. 49. Amplitude
  50. 50. Amplitude
  51. 51. Amplitude
  52. 52. “OH NO!”
  53. 53. “OH NO!” “A few students didn’t get to go.”
  54. 54. “OH NO!”
  55. 55. “OH NO!” “He’s Dead”
  56. 56. • Activity! Please point out the following. – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. • Activity! Please point out the following. – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. • Activity! Please point out the following. – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. • Activity! Please point out the following. – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. • Activity! Please point out the following. – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • Activity! Please point out the following. – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • Activity! Please point out the following. – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • Activity! Please point out the following. – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • Activity! Can I time it perfectly? – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Activity! Can I time it perfectly? – Crest -Height -Trough -Wavelength Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. • Activity Simulator: FM / Radiowaves • http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/radi o-waves
  67. 67. • We know the material of the interior of the earth based on how P and S waves move through the planet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. Learn more about P and S Waves at… http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_scienc e/terc/content/visualizations/es1009/es1009pa ge01.cfm
  69. 69. • Activity! Making Waves with a Slinky • Teacher will demonstrate waves after we learn them. (Eye Wear!) – Draw waves in journal. – Try and identify waves after sketches. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • Mechanical Waves are waves which propagate through a material like rock. – They can be Longitudinal and Transverse
  71. 71. • Mechanical Waves are waves which propagate through a material like rock. – They can be Longitudinal and Transverse
  72. 72. • Mechanical Waves are waves which propagate through a material like rock. – They can be Longitudinal and Transverse
  73. 73. • Longitudinal wave: A wave that is propagated in the same direction as the displacement of the transmitting medium
  74. 74. • Longitudinal wave: A wave that is propagated in the same direction as the displacement of the transmitting medium – Primary Wave, (P-Wave) Arrives first / Fast
  75. 75. • Longitudinal wave: A wave that is propagated in the same direction as the displacement of the transmitting medium – Primary Wave, (P-Wave) Arrives first / Fast
  76. 76. • Transverse Waves: The particle displacement is perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation
  77. 77. • Transverse Waves: The particle displacement is perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation • Secondary Wave (S-Wave) Slower but powerful.
  78. 78. • Transverse Waves: The particle displacement is perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation • Secondary Wave (S-Wave) Slower but powerful.
  79. 79. • Video Link! Longitudinal and Transverse Waves. (Interesting) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLAB- d8VnZ8
  80. 80. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  81. 81. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  82. 82. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  83. 83. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  84. 84. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  85. 85. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  86. 86. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  87. 87. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  88. 88. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  89. 89. • Which is a longitudinal wave, and which is a transverse wave?
  90. 90. • Is this a transverse wave or longitudinal wave?
  91. 91. • Is this a transverse wave or longitudinal wave?
  92. 92. • P Wave: Primary wave. Moves lateral Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93. • P Wave: Primary wave. Moves lateral Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94. • P Wave: Primary wave. Moves lateral Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. • P Wave: Primary wave. Moves lateral Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96. • P Wave: Primary wave. Moves lateral Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. • S Wave: Secondary waves. Stronger and moves back and forth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. • S Wave: Secondary waves. Stronger and moves back and forth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  99. 99. • S Wave: Secondary waves. Stronger and moves back and forth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. • S Wave: Secondary waves. Stronger and moves back and forth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  101. 101. • S Wave: Secondary waves. Stronger and moves back and forth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102. • Is this a Primary wave or a secondary wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  103. 103. • Is this a Primary wave or a secondary wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  104. 104. • Is this a Primary wave or a secondary wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  105. 105. • Is this a Primary wave or a secondary wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  106. 106. • Is this a Primary wave or a secondary wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  107. 107. • Where do we see this type of wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108. • Answer! Ocean / on water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109. • Rayleigh waves can also move through the earth in an earthquake. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. • Is this a Primary Wave? Explain. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111. • Is this a Primary Wave? Explain. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112. • Answer! This is primary wave because it moves lateral (across) and not up and down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  113. 113. • Answer! This is primary wave because it moves lateral (across) and not up and down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  114. 114. • Answer! This is primary wave because it moves lateral (across) and not up and down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115. • These waves are felt first during an earthquake. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  116. 116. • Last type of wave. • Love Wave, side to side and up and down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  117. 117. • Last type of wave. • Love Wave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  118. 118. • Last type of wave. • Love Wave, side to side and up and down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  119. 119. • Last type of wave. • Love Wave, side to side and up and down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  120. 120. • Last type of wave. • Love Wave, side to side and up and down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  121. 121. • Last type of wave. • Love Wave, side to side and up and down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  122. 122. • Which is a Rayleigh Wave, and which is a Love Wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  123. 123. • Which is a Rayleigh Wave, and which is a Love Wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124. • Which is a Rayleigh Wave, and which is a Love Wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  125. 125. • Which is a Rayleigh Wave, and which is a Love Wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  126. 126. • Which is a Rayleigh Wave, and which is a Love Wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  127. 127. • Which is a Rayleigh Wave, and which is a Love Wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  128. 128. • Which is a Rayleigh Wave, and which is a Love Wave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  129. 129. “Oh-no!” “We are trying it one more time.”
  130. 130. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  131. 131. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  132. 132. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  133. 133. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  134. 134. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  135. 135. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  137. 137. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  138. 138. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  139. 139. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  140. 140. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  142. 142. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. • What two types of waves can be seen below? Which is which? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145. • Which wave is faster? S or P. • S-Wave P-Wave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  146. 146. • Which wave is faster? S or P. • S-Wave P-Wave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147. • Which wave is faster? S or P. • S-Wave P-Wave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148. • Which wave is faster? S or P. • S-Wave P-Wave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  149. 149. • Which wave is faster? S or P. • S-Wave P-Wave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  150. 150. • Which wave is faster? S or P. • S-Wave P-Wave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  151. 151. • Which wave is faster? S or P. • S-Wave P-Wave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  152. 152. • Which wave is faster? S or P. • S-Wave P-Wave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  153. 153. • Name the wave?
  154. 154. • Name the wave?
  155. 155. • Name the wave?
  156. 156. • Name the wave?
  157. 157. • Name the wave?
  158. 158. • Name the wave?
  159. 159. • Name the wave?
  160. 160. • Name the wave?
  161. 161. • Name the wave?
  162. 162. • Name the wave?
  163. 163. • Name the wave?
  164. 164. • Name the wave?
  165. 165. • Name the wave? Which one is a Longitudinal Wave?
  166. 166. • Name the wave? Which one is a Longitudinal Wave?
  167. 167. • Name the wave? Which one is a Longitudinal Wave?
  168. 168. • Name the wave? Which ones are Transverse Waves?
  169. 169. • Name the wave? Which ones are Transverse Waves?
  170. 170.  Light is a particle and a wave and goes out in a straight line unless it bumps something. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171. Just a little bit about light…
  172. 172. • Magnification deals with light. – Light travels in a straight line (transmission) until it hits something. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  173. 173. • Magnification deals with light. – Light travels in a straight line (transmission) until it hits something. – Light can do a few things such as be absorbed, reflected / scattered, interference. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  174. 174. • Refraction: The bending of a wave when it enters a medium where its speed is changed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  175. 175. • An eagle must compensate for refraction when catching a fish. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  176. 176. • An eagle must compensate for refraction when catching a fish. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  177. 177. • An eagle must compensate for refraction when catching a fish. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. • Activity! Disappearing Coin. – Place a coin under an empty glass and cover with a plate or board and observe. – Try again and this time fill the glass ¾ of the way with water and cover with plate or board.
  179. 179. • Light can be bent by gravity.
  180. 180. White Light
  181. 181. White Light Dispersion
  182. 182. • Wave reflection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. • Wave reflection. – Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves change directions as a result of "bouncing off" a surface like a mirror. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • Wave reflection. – Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves change directions as a result of "bouncing off" a surface like a mirror. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • Wave reflection. – Reflection occurs when light or ocean waves change directions as a result of "bouncing off" a surface like a mirror. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. – Diffraction: Bending of waves. – Scattering: Bouncing off of something Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  188. 188. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  189. 189. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  190. 190. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  191. 191. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  192. 192. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  193. 193. Light waves could be absorbed by the object, in which case its energy is converted to heat
  194. 194. • Why is the sky blue? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  198. 198. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  199. 199. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  200. 200. • The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It is a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  201. 201. Shorter wave-lengths longer wave-lengths Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  202. 202. • Which letter represents the blue light that we see, and which represents the red light? A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  203. 203. • Answer! B represents the smaller wave length of light scattering off of N2 and O2. A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  204. 204. • Why then, are sunsets red, yellow, and orange? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  205. 205. • Answer! The sun is not directly overhead and passes across the atmosphere. The blue light is scattered out, leaving the longer reds, oranges, and yellows. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. • Wave interference. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. • Wave interference. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  208. 208. • Ripple tank simulator. • http://www.falstad.com/ripple/ • Identify some properties of waves, include reflection, interference and diffraction (refraction?). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. • Video! Ripple Tank (Interference) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=- 8a61G8Hvi0
  210. 210. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  211. 211. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is diverging light?
  212. 212. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Diverging Light
  213. 213. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Diverging Light
  214. 214. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Converging light
  215. 215. • Lens: A transparent optical device used to converge or diverge transmitted light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Converging light
  216. 216. • Activity! Sketching Converging light. – Please view the video (twice?) and sketch / copy what you see. – You will need a straight edge (ruler). – Please copy the beginning template on the next slide as best you can before you start video.
  217. 217. • Video Link! Ray Box and Optics. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gyGfiiC3 ms&feature=related Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  218. 218. • Activity Simulator: • http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/geo metric-optics
  219. 219. • Activity! Converging light sketch / lens – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrNB_BacI kA&feature=related – Sketch this starting template (double convex)
  220. 220. • Activity! Diverging light sketch / lens – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fUygzGO3b4 &feature=related – Sketch this starting template (double concave)
  221. 221. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  223. 223. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  224. 224. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is converging light?
  225. 225. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which lens is converging light?
  226. 226. Convex Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  227. 227. Convex Concave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  228. 228. Convex Concave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  229. 229. Convex Concave Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Get out of my cave.”
  230. 230. • Concavo-convex
  231. 231. • Concavo-convex
  232. 232. • Which a concave polygon?
  233. 233. • Which a concave polygon?
  234. 234. • Adjusting the lens, adjusts the focus and will allow you to see clearly.
  235. 235. • Adjusting the lens, adjusts the focus and will allow you to see clearly.
  236. 236. • Adjusting the lens, adjusts the focus and will allow you to see clearly.
  237. 237. • Activity! – On next slide teacher minimizes out of slide show. – Teachers assists the students drag focal point to the correct location using teachers computer.
  238. 238. • Activity! Place the four dots on the focal point of each picture below.
  239. 239. • Activity! Place the four dots on the focal point of each picture below.
  240. 240. • Activity! Place the four dots on the focal point of each picture below.
  241. 241. • Answer:
  242. 242. Reminder to teacher! Reset focal points for next group.
  243. 243. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  244. 244. • Which is double convex? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  245. 245. • Which is double convex? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  246. 246. • Which is double concave? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  247. 247. • Concave Mirror Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  248. 248. • Convex mirror Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  249. 249. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  250. 250. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  251. 251. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  252. 252. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  253. 253. • Which mirror is convex, and which mirror is concave?
  254. 254. • For those who wear eyeglasses, the shape of the lens in the eye glasses help to correct the focus point. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  255. 255. • These eyeglasses are double_________? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  256. 256. • These eyeglasses are double_________? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Concave
  257. 257. • These eyeglasses are double_________? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Concave
  258. 258. • Nearsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  259. 259. • Nearsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  260. 260. • Farsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  261. 261. • Farsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  262. 262. • Which is nearsightedness, and which is far sightedness?
  263. 263. Farsightedness
  264. 264. Farsightedness Nearsightedness
  265. 265. Farsightedness Nearsightedness
  266. 266. • Is this person nearsighted or far sighted? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  267. 267. • Answer! Farsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  268. 268. • Answer! Farsighted Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  269. 269. • Activity! Vision test. Second from the bottom row from the back of the room. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  270. 270. • Hubble Space Telescope.
  271. 271. • Raise your hand when you think you know the picture beneath the boxes. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  272. 272. • Activity! Stations Carousel. – Lens types, focal points, and color paddles. – 5 minutes at each station. Total of 6 stations. – Handout will be supplied with directions for all of the stations in the activities folder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  273. 273. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  274. 274. • Polarized Lenses: Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  275. 275. • Polarized Lenses: Think of them as window blinds with slats. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  276. 276. • Polarized Lenses: Think of them as window blinds with slats. Light travels in waves. As the waves come to the slats, any waves that are not lined up with the openings in the slats are blocked out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  277. 277. • Polarized Lenses: Think of them as window blinds with slats. Light travels in waves. As the waves come to the slats, any waves that are not lined up with the openings in the slats are blocked out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  278. 278. • 3-D Glasses:
  279. 279. 3-D glasses and images may trigger photosensitive seizure. Do not participate if you are sensitive.
  280. 280. • 3-D Glasses: The different colored glasses allow only one of the images into each eye because they contain lenses with different polarization. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  281. 281. • In order to see things in 3D each eye must see a slightly different picture.
  282. 282. • In order to see things in 3D each eye must see a slightly different picture. Put on 3-D glasses, cover one eye and then the other to see the text disappear on the next slides.
  283. 283. • In order to see things in 3D each eye must see a slightly different picture. This is done in the real world by your eyes being spaced apart so each eye has its own slightly different view.
  284. 284. • In order to see things in 3D each eye must see a slightly different picture. This is done in the real world by your eyes being spaced apart so each eye has its own slightly different view.
  285. 285. • In order to see things in 3D each eye must see a slightly different picture. This is done in the real world by your eyes being spaced apart so each eye has its own slightly different view. The brain then puts the two pictures together to form one 3D image that has depth to it.
  286. 286. • In order to see things in 3D each eye must see a slightly different picture. This is done in the real world by your eyes being spaced apart so each eye has its own slightly different view. The brain then puts the two pictures together to form one 3D image that has depth to it.
  287. 287. • Some music for the 3D experience. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gt3OptaZ20Q
  288. 288. • 3-D Glasses:
  289. 289. • 3D Video Link –Unsupervised kid with too many weapons / dangerous power tools. – http://www.youtube.com/user/1tompo1?featur e=results_main – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foQNrtUsEj w&feature=relmfu
  290. 290. • 3D Video Link – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKujOudUk0w
  291. 291. THE END
  292. 292. • http://sciencepowerpoint.comWebsite Link:
  293. 293. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Areas of Focus within The Matter, Energy, and the Environment Unit. There is no such thing as a free lunch, Matter, Dark Matter, Elements and Compounds, States of Matter, Solids, Liquids, Gases, Plasma, Law Conservation of Matter, Physical Change, Chemical Change, Gas Laws, Charles Law, Avogadro’s Law, Ideal Gas Law, Pascal’s Law, Viscosity, Archimedes Principle, Buoyancy, Seven Forms of Energy, Nuclear Energy, Electromagnet Spectrum, Waves / Wavelengths, Light (Visible Light), Refraction, Diffraction, Lens, Convex / Concave, Radiation, Electricity, Lightning, Static Electricity, Magnetism, Coulomb’s Law, Conductors, Insulators, Semi-conductors, AC and DC current, Amps, Watts, Resistance, Magnetism, Faraday’s Law, Compass, Relativity, Einstein, and E=MC2, Energy, First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics, Third Law of Thermodynamics, Industrial Processes, Environmental Studies, The 4 R’s, Sustainability, Human Population Growth, Carrying Capacity, Green Design, Renewable Forms of Energy.
  294. 294. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  295. 295. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  296. 296. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
  297. 297. • http://sciencepowerpoint.comWebsite Link:

×