Introduction of the Atom, Physical Science Lesson PowerPoint, Nucleus

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Atoms and Periodic Table of the Elements unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 2000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 12 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 15 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus: -Atoms (Atomic Force Microscopes), Rutherford's Gold Foil Experiment, Cathode Tube, Atoms, Fundamental Particles, The Nucleus, Isotopes, AMU, Size of Atoms and Particles, Quarks, Recipe of the Universe, Atomic Theory, Atomic Symbols, #'s, Valence Electrons, Octet Rule, SPONCH Atoms, Molecules, Hydrocarbons (Structure), Alcohols (Structure), Proteins (Structure), Periodic Table of the Elements, Organization of Periodic Table, Transition Metals, Electron Negativity, Non-Metals, Metals, Metalloids, Atomic Bonds, Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Metallic Bonds, Ionization, and much more.

This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

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Introduction of the Atom, Physical Science Lesson PowerPoint, Nucleus

  1. 1. • Answer! (2 Protons) Atomic #2 (Helium) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indents when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Neutron Proton Electron
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  6. 6. The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7. • How small is an atom?
  8. 8. • Activity! Bringing things down to size. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com
  9. 9. • Activity! Bringing things down to size. – Take one sheet of paper 8 by 11. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com
  10. 10. • Activity! Bringing things down to size. – Take one sheet of paper 8 by 11. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com
  11. 11. • Activity! Bringing things down to size. – Take one sheet of paper 8 by 11. – Cut it in half as precisely as possible. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com
  12. 12. • Activity! Bringing things down to size. – Take one sheet of paper 8 by 11. – Cut it in half as precisely as possible. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com
  13. 13. • Activity! Bringing things down to size. – Take one sheet of paper 8 by 11. – Cut it in half as precisely as possible. – Cut in half again and again. Keep track. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 1
  14. 14. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 2
  15. 15. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 2 Line up scraps from large to small.
  16. 16. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 3
  17. 17. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 4
  18. 18. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 5
  19. 19. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 6
  20. 20. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 7
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  22. 22. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 9
  23. 23. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 10
  24. 24. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 11
  25. 25. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 12
  26. 26. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 13
  27. 27. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 14
  28. 28. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 15
  29. 29. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 16
  30. 30. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the product of Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 www.sciencepowerpoint.com 17
  31. 31. 84
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  33. 33. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 86
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  36. 36. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 89
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  38. 38. • Answer: If you were to cut the paper in half about 90 times, you would be around the size of the atom. 90
  39. 39. • Answer: If you were to cut the paper in half about 90 times, you would be around the size of the atom. The atom is incredibly small. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 90
  40. 40. • Answer: If you were to cut the paper in half about 90 times, you would be around the size of the atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 90
  41. 41. • About a million atoms stacked on top of each other = the thickness of a sheet of paper. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • About 5 million atoms make up a period at the end of a sentence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Link! Size Scale of the Universe (Flash) • From Sub-Atomic to the Universe. – http://inciswf.com/589217_scale_of_universe_ enhanced.swf
  44. 44. • Atoms worksheet available.
  45. 45. • Atoms worksheet available.
  46. 46. • Journal Question? – Please use the round Petri-dish to create a circle. – Inside the circle, write everything you know about the atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • Video Link! The size of atoms – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQP4UJhNn0I Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. • Video Link, Atoms, Googol’s, and the Googolplex. (7 minutes) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gh4F5BQ8hgw Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • Is this you billions of years ago? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Answer! The atomic particles spinning around billions of years ago are the same atoms that make up planets and all that are on them. Yes, your atoms were stardust. Answer! The atomic particles spinning around billions of years ago are the same atoms that make up planets and all that are on them. Yes, you were once a gas cloud spinning around the universe.
  51. 51. • Can we see atoms? – Is this drawing accurate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • These pictures just represent what the atom might look like. – They are simple models meant for understanding. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. • These pictures just represent what the atom might look like. – They are simple models meant for understanding. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • These pictures just represent what the atom might look like. – They are simple models meant for understanding. – Today I will attempt to help you understand the universe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55. • These pictures just represent what the atom might look like. – They are simple models meant for understanding. – Today I will attempt to help you understand the universe. – I unfortunately must use simple pictures because as we know atoms are very small and they are mostly empty space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56. • We can’t see individual atoms. – We can see billions and billions of them bonded together.
  57. 57. • We can’t see individual atoms. – We can see billions and billions of them bonded together.
  58. 58. • Atomic Force Microscope Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. • Atomic Force Microscope Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. • Video Link! A Boy and His Atom – Smallest movie ever made from IBM. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSCX78-8-q0 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • Video Link! A Boy and His Atom – Smallest movie ever made from IBM. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSCX78-8-q0 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Making of (Optional) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_8LHqwYMKY
  62. 62. • Video! A look at the atoms in steel. • Look closely to get a good look atom . – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNvdrpEmS48 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • An atom has charged particles, this means it has a (+) and a (-) charge. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • An atom has charged particles, this means it has a (+) and a (-) charge. – Atoms and some of the particles they are made of carry a charge. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • (Optional) Recommended Link! Khan Academy Introduces the Atom. • 21 minutes • http://www.khanacademy.org/video/introduc tion-to-the-atom?playlist=Chemistry
  66. 66. • Atoms worksheet available.
  67. 67. • Early experiments realized that that atoms were charged particles. One of those experiments is a Crookes tube. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • Early experiments realized that that atoms were charged particles. One of those experiments is a Crookes tube. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Hoot” “Hoot” I can’t wait to see how this Crookes tube thing works.”
  69. 69. • Early experiments realized that that atoms were charged particles. One of those experiments is a Crookes tube. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • Video! Cathode Ray tube. – Record a picture of it in your journal and how it worked to help show that atoms carry a charge. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XU8nMKkzbT8 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy -
  72. 72. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy + -
  73. 73. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy + - Like charges (-) (-) repel. The Electron is negative.
  74. 74. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Opposite charges attract (+) (-). The electrons are negative.
  78. 78. • What did this study find? • It helped lead to J.J. Thompson to realizing that this ray is negatively charged. (electron) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • What did this study find? – It helped lead J.J. Thompson to realizing that this ray is negatively charged. (electron) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. • What did this study find? – It helped lead J.J. Thompson to realizing that this ray is negatively charged. (electron) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more: http://explorable.com/cathode- ray-experiment.html
  81. 81. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83. • Knowing that an atom had a charge was just the first step. Scientists still didn’t know the structure of the atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84. • Knowing that an atom had a charge was just the first step. Scientists still didn’t know the structure of the atom. – J.J. Thompsons early plum pudding model of an atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • Knowing that an atom had a charge was just the first step. Scientists still didn’t know the structure of the atom. – J.J. Thompsons early plum pudding model of an atom. (This was incorrect) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • Atoms worksheet available.
  87. 87. • Ernest Rutherford’s experiment used particles and reflection to determine the structure of the atom. – What is the mystery shape in the next slide, using your knowledge of reflection? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88. • Ernest Rutherford’s experiment used particles and reflection to determine the structure of the atom. – What is the mystery shape in the next slide. Use your knowledge of reflection? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89. • Try and guess the mystery shape below based on how objects would reflect off it. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90. • Answer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. • Ernest Rutherford had to make sense of a puzzle similar to this to figure out the structure of the atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  92. 92. • Ernest Rutherford had to make sense of a puzzle similar to this to figure out the structure of the atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93. • Ernest Rutherford had to make sense of a puzzle similar to this to figure out the structure of the atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94.  Rutherford’s gold foil experiment Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. • Video! Rutherford’s Gold Foil Experiment – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pZj0u_XMbc Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96. • In Rutherford's experiment, a radioactive source shot a stream of alpha particles at a sheet of very thin gold foil which stood in front of a screen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. • In Rutherford's experiment, a radioactive source shot a stream of alpha particles at a sheet of very thin gold foil which stood in front of a screen. – The alpha particles would make small flashes of light where they hit the screen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. • Since some of the positive alpha particles were substantially deflected, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  99. 99. • Since some of the positive alpha particles were substantially deflected, Rutherford concluded that there must be something inside an atom for the alpha particles to bounce off of, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. • Since some of the positive alpha particles were substantially deflected, Rutherford concluded that there must be something inside an atom for the alpha particles to bounce off of, that must be small, dense, and positively charged. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  101. 101. • Since some of the positive alpha particles were substantially deflected, Rutherford concluded that there must be something inside an atom for the alpha particles to bounce off of, that must be small, dense, and positively charged. The Nucleus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
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  142. 142. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The history of the atom. Learn more at… http://www.nobeliefs.com/atom.htm Ernest Rutherford: Learn more… http://www.rutherford.org.nz/
  144. 144.  An Atom is the smallest part of an element which can take part in a chemical reaction. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145.  The atom consists of three fundamental particles  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  146. 146.  Proton + (positive charge) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147.  Proton + (positive charge) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148.  Proton + (positive charge) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy +
  149. 149.  Proton + (positive charge) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  150. 150.  Proton + (positive charge) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy + +
  151. 151.  Proton + (positive charge) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy + +
  152. 152.  Neutron 0 (neutral charge / no charge) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  153. 153.  Neutron 0 (neutral charge / no charge) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154.  Neutron 0 (neutral charge / no charge). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155.  Neutron 0 (neutral charge / no charge). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Neutron: A particle that appears in the nucleus of all atoms except hydrogen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • Neutron: A particle that appears in the nucleus of all atoms except hydrogen. – Neutrons have no electrical charge and just a bit more mass than a proton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158. • Neutron: A particle that appears in the nucleus of all atoms except hydrogen. – Neutrons have no electrical charge and just a bit more mass than a proton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159. • Neutron: A particle that appears in the nucleus of all atoms except hydrogen. – Neutrons have no electrical charge and just a bit more mass than a proton. – A neutron walks into a video store. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160. • Neutron: A particle that appears in the nucleus of all atoms except hydrogen. – Neutrons have no electrical charge and just a bit more mass than a proton. – He asks the clerk “How much are the movies?” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161. • Neutron: A particle that appears in the nucleus of all atoms except hydrogen. – Neutrons have no electrical charge and just a bit more mass than a proton. – He asks the clerk “How much are the movies?” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “For you…” “No Charge.”
  162. 162. • Neutron: A particle that appears in the nucleus of all atoms except hydrogen. – Neutrons have no electrical charge and just a bit more mass than a proton. – He asks the clerk “How much are the movies?” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “For you…” “No Charge.”
  163. 163. • Neutron: A particle that appears in the nucleus of all atoms except hydrogen. – Neutrons have no electrical charge and just a bit more mass than a proton. – He asks the clerk “How much are the movies?” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164.  Electron – (negative charge) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  165. 165. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy +
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  173. 173.  Nucleus: The positively charged center of the atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  174. 174.  Nucleus: The positively charged center of the atom.  The nucleus has an incredibly high density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  175. 175.  Nucleus: The positively charged center of the atom.  The nucleus has an incredibly high density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Equal to a million million million kg m-3 or a thousand million million tonnes m-3
  176. 176.  Nucleus: The positively charged center of the atom.  The nucleus has an incredibly high density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Or 6 billion or so cars stuffed into a small cardboard box.
  177. 177. • Nucleus: The positively charged center of the atom. – The nucleus has an incredibly high density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. Nucleus
  179. 179. Nucleus
  180. 180. Nucleus
  181. 181. Nucleus
  182. 182. Nucleus
  183. 183. Nucleus
  184. 184. Nucleus
  185. 185. Nucleus
  186. 186. Nucleus
  187. 187. Nucleus
  188. 188. Nucleus
  189. 189. Nucleus
  190. 190. Nucleus
  191. 191. Nucleus
  192. 192. Nucleus Atoms General. Learn more before the quiz. at… http://web.jjay.cuny.edu/~acarpi/NSC/3-atoms.htm
  193. 193. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name that part of the Atom. – Proton, Neutron, Electron, Nucleus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. 1
  195. 195. 2
  196. 196. 3
  197. 197. 4
  198. 198. 5
  199. 199. 6
  200. 200. 7
  201. 201. 8
  202. 202. 9
  203. 203. 10
  204. 204. • Bonus Question! • Name the Superhero?
  205. 205. • Answers! 1-10 Name that part of the Atom. • Proton, Neutron, Electron, Nucleus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. 1
  207. 207. 1Nucleus
  208. 208. 1Nucleus Could be the proton in Hydrogen and the electron is flying around.
  209. 209. 2
  210. 210. 2 Electron
  211. 211. 3
  212. 212. 3Neutron
  213. 213. 4
  214. 214. 4Proton
  215. 215. 5
  216. 216. 5Electron
  217. 217. 6
  218. 218. 6Nucleus
  219. 219. 7
  220. 220. 7Electron
  221. 221. 8
  222. 222. 8 Nucleus
  223. 223. 8 Nucleus Electron Cloud
  224. 224. 9
  225. 225. 9Nucleus
  226. 226. 10
  227. 227. 10Proton and the nucleus Hydrogen
  228. 228. • Bonus Question! • Name the Superhero?
  229. 229. • Bonus Question! • Name the Superhero? The Flash
  230. 230. • What is this a picture of?
  231. 231. • What is this a picture of? Our Solar System
  232. 232. • What is this a picture of? Our Solar System • Why am I showing you this?
  233. 233. • What is this a picture of? Our Solar System • Why am I showing you this? To show the incorrect behavior of subatomic particles.
  234. 234. • Activity! Pin the tail on the electron! – One volunteer needs to tape the tail to the electron. Blindfold not needed.
  235. 235. • Activity! Pin the tail on the electron! – One volunteer needs to tape the tail to the electron. Blindfold not needed.
  236. 236. • Activity! Pin the tail on the electron! – What is the point in this activity?
  237. 237. • Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle – You can't know with certainty both where an electron is and where it's going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  238. 238. • Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle – You can't know with certainty both where an electron is and where it's going next. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  239. 239. • Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle – You can't know with certainty both where an electron is and where it's going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  240. 240. • Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle – You can't know with certainty both where an electron is and where it's going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  241. 241. • Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle – You can't know with certainty both where an electron is and where it's going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus. This is also true for the Proton and Neutron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  242. 242. • Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle – You can't know with certainty both where an electron is and where it's going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus. This is also true for the Proton and Neutron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more (advanced) at… http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/science- questions/quantum-suicide2.htm
  243. 243. Nucleus
  244. 244. Electron
  245. 245. Electron, really a kilometer away if the nucleus is right here.
  246. 246. Could you pin point the exact location of any single particle?
  247. 247. Could you pin point the exact location of any single particle? Where will the electron be on the next slide – Put a marker to see if we will be right.
  248. 248. You can’t pinpoint the exact location of any single particle according to The Hinesburg Uncertainty Principle.
  249. 249. Could you provide a general region you might find a particular particle?
  250. 250. Could you provide a general region you might find a particular particle? Yes, the nucleus was usually found around here.
  251. 251. Could you provide a general region you might find a particular particle? Yes, the nucleus was usually found around here.
  252. 252. Could you provide a general region you might find a particular particle? The Electron was usually found in this region.
  253. 253. Could you provide a general region you might find a particular particle? The Electron was usually found in this region.
  254. 254. • These type of models are just to help us understand. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  255. 255. • Heisenburg Uncertainty Principle. – Video Link! Hanks explains. – Preview for language. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=noZWLPpj3to
  256. 256. • Neils Bohr Model (1913): Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  257. 257. • Neils Bohr Model (1913): Depicts the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons that travel in circular orbits around the nucleus – . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  258. 258. • Neils Bohr Model (1913): Depicts the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons that travel in circular orbits around the nucleus – . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  259. 259. • Neils Bohr Model (1913): Depicts the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons that travel in circular orbits around the nucleus – . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Because of its simplicity, the Bohr model is still commonly taught to introduce students to quantum mechanics.
  260. 260. • Neils Bohr Model (1913): Depicts the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons that travel in circular orbits around the nucleus – . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Because of its simplicity, the Bohr model is still commonly taught to introduce students to quantum mechanics. We will touch upon this later in the unit.
  261. 261. • Atoms worksheet available.
  262. 262. • Activity – Creating an accurate model of an atom. Atomic Cloud model. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  263. 263. • Activity – Creating an accurate model of an atom. Atomic Cloud model. – Create a small nucleus (3 protons) and then make 500 hundred dots (Three Electrons moving at the speed of light around the nucleus.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  264. 264. • Activity – Creating an accurate model of an atom. Atomic Cloud model. – Create a small nucleus (3 protons) and then make 500 hundred dots (Three Electrons moving at the speed of light around the nucleus.) – Label model as Atomic Cloud Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  265. 265. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Circle 3 Electrons
  266. 266. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  267. 267. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy These are the three electrons in the Lithium Atom
  268. 268. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy These are the three electrons in the Lithium Atom They are moving at the speed of light
  269. 269. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy These are the three electrons in the Lithium Atom They are moving at the speed of light 299,792, 458 m / s in a vacuum
  270. 270. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  271. 271. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy They are everywhere and nowhere?
  272. 272. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy They are everywhere and nowhere? An atom is mostly empty space
  273. 273. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy E M P T Y S P A C E
  274. 274. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy E M P T Y S P A C E Everything is composed chiefly of nothing
  275. 275. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  276. 276. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  277. 277. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  278. 278. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  279. 279. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  280. 280. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy It has to do with the uncertainty principle.
  281. 281. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy It has to do with the uncertainty principle. -The electron cannot have a defined position in the nuclei of atoms means that it must occupy every other space within the atom in a wave of possibilities.
  282. 282. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy It has to do with the uncertainty principle. -The electron cannot have a defined position in the nuclei of atoms means that it must occupy every other space within the atom in a wave of possibilities. Pauli exclusion principle: The principle that two fermions of a given type, such as electrons, protons, or neutrons, cannot occupy the same quantum state. It does not apply to bosons. This principle plays a key role in the electron orbital structure of atoms, since it prevents more than two electrons from occupying any given orbital (two are allowed, since they may have opposite spin, and thus be in different quantum states) More difficult explanation.
  283. 283. • You should have completed page 2 of the bundled homework package.
  284. 284. • You should have completed page 2 of the bundled homework package.
  285. 285. • You should have completed page 2 of the bundled homework package.
  286. 286. • You should have completed page 2 of the bundled homework package.
  287. 287.  Atoms always have the same number of protons and electrons, this is called the atomic number. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  288. 288.  Atoms always have the same number of protons and electrons, this is called the atomic number. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  289. 289.  Atoms always have the same number of protons and electrons, this is called the atomic number. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  290. 290.  Atoms always have the same number of protons and electrons, this is called the atomic number. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  291. 291.  Atoms always have the same number of protons and electrons, this is called the atomic number. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  292. 292. • What atom is this How can you tell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  293. 293. • Answer! (2 Protons) Atomic #2 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  294. 294. • Answer! (2 Protons) Atomic #2 (Helium) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  295. 295. • Answer! (2 Protons) Atomic #2 (Helium) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  296. 296. • Answer! (2 Protons) Atomic #2 (Helium) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  297. 297. • Answer! (2 Protons) Atomic #2 (Helium) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  298. 298. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  299. 299. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  300. 300. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  301. 301. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  302. 302. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  303. 303. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  304. 304. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  305. 305. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  306. 306. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  307. 307. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Note: Only the first letter is capitalized.
  308. 308. Atomic Number Atomic Symbol Name Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Note: Only the first letter is capitalized. Also note that the atomic symbol for Silver is Si . Si is the atomic Symbol for Silicon.
  309. 309.  The Nucleus has almost all the mass of the atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  310. 310.  The Nucleus has almost all the mass of the atom.  It’s made up of protons (+) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy + +
  311. 311.  The Nucleus has almost all the mass of the atom.  It’s made up of protons (+) and neutrons (O) (0). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy + + o o
  312. 312.  The Nucleus has almost all the mass of the atom.  It’s made up of protons (+) and neutrons (O) (0). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Mostly empty space except for dense nucleus + + o o
  313. 313.  The Nucleus has almost all the mass of the atom.  It’s made up of protons (+) and neutrons (O) (0). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Mostly empty space except for dense nucleus + + o o
  314. 314. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  315. 315. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  316. 316. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  317. 317. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  318. 318. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 0 1
  319. 319. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 0 1
  320. 320. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 0 1
  321. 321. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 0 1
  322. 322. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 0 1
  323. 323. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 0 1
  324. 324. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 0 1
  325. 325. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  326. 326. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  327. 327. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2 2 2
  328. 328. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2 2 2
  329. 329. • The smallest atoms are Hydrogen (H) and Helium (He). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2 2 2
  330. 330.  Isotope: Atom with the same number of protons and electrons but different numbers of neutrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  331. 331.  Isotope: Atom with the same number of protons and electrons but different numbers of neutrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  332. 332.  Isotope: Atom with the same number of protons and electrons but different numbers of neutrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  333. 333.  Isotope: Atom with the same number of protons and electrons but different numbers of neutrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  334. 334. • Two Carbon Isotopes, C-12, and C-14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  335. 335. • Two Carbon Isotopes, C-12, and C-14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  336. 336. • Two Carbon Isotopes, C-12, and C-14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  337. 337. • Two Carbon Isotopes, C-12, and C-14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  338. 338. • Two Carbon Isotopes, C-12, and C-14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Two extra neutrons
  339. 339. • Two Carbon Isotopes, C-12, and C-14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Two extra neutrons
  340. 340. • Two Carbon Isotopes, C-12, and C-14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Two extra neutrons Carbon will always have 6 protons in its nucleus
  341. 341. • Two Carbon Isotopes, C-12, and C-14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Two extra neutrons Carbon will always have 6 protons in its nucleus
  342. 342. • Two Carbon Isotopes, C-12, and C-14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Two extra neutrons Carbon will always have 6 protons in its nucleus
  343. 343. • Atoms worksheet available.
  344. 344.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  345. 345.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Atomic Mass is the number of Protons and Neutrons
  346. 346.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember, electrons are so small they don’t add much to atomic mass
  347. 347.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  348. 348.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  349. 349.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  350. 350.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 14 - 6 =
  351. 351.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 14 - 6 = 8
  352. 352.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 14 - 6 = 8
  353. 353.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 14 - 6 = 8 amu (atomic mass units)
  354. 354.  To find the number of neutrons: Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 14 - 6 = 8 amu (atomic mass units) Atomic Number. Learn more at http://education.jlab.org/qa/pen_ number.html
  355. 355. • Activity! Atomic Mass and Isotopes Simulator. • http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/isot opes-and-atomic-mass
  356. 356. • Count up the Protons, and then count up the neutrons. What element is this? What would be a rough guess for its atomic mass. + + + Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  357. 357. • Answer! This is Lithium, atomic number = 3. + + + Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  358. 358. • Answer! This is Lithium, atomic number = 3. + + + Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 3 Protons so it must have…
  359. 359. • Answer! This is Lithium, atomic number = 3. + + + Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 3 Protons so it must have… 3 Electrons
  360. 360. • Answer! This is Lithium, atomic number = 3. There are 4 neutrons however. + + + Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  361. 361. • Answer! This is Lithium, atomic number = 3. There are 4 neutrons however. + + + Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  362. 362. • Answer! This is Lithium, atomic number = 3. There are 4 neutrons however. The atomic mass would be roughly 7 as electrons don’t weigh very much. + + + Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  363. 363. • Answer! This is Lithium, atomic number = 3. There are 4 neutrons however. The atomic mass would be roughly 7 as electrons don’t weigh very much. + + + Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Atomic Mass: 6.941 amu.
  364. 364. • Atoms worksheet available.
  365. 365. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  366. 366. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  367. 367. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  368. 368. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  369. 369. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  370. 370. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  371. 371. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  372. 372. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? 9 • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  373. 373. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? 9 • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  374. 374. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? 9 • What is the atomic Mass? 19 amu – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  375. 375. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? 9 • What is the atomic Mass? 19 amu – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  376. 376. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? 9 • What is the atomic Mass? 19 amu – How many Neutrons? 19 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  377. 377. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? 9 • What is the atomic Mass? 19 amu – How many Neutrons? 19 - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  378. 378. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? 9 • What is the atomic Mass? 19 amu – How many Neutrons? 19 - 9 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  379. 379. • What is the atomic symbol? F • What is the atomic number? 9 – How many Protons? 9 – How many Electrons? 9 • What is the atomic Mass? 19 amu – How many Neutrons? 19 - 9 = 10 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  380. 380. • Atoms worksheet available.
  381. 381. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  382. 382. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? opyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  383. 383. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons?
  384. 384. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons?
  385. 385. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons?
  386. 386. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons?
  387. 387. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons?
  388. 388. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons?
  389. 389. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? 18 • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons?
  390. 390. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? 18 • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons?
  391. 391. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? 18 • What is the atomic Mass? 39.95 amu – How many Neutrons?
  392. 392. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? 18 • What is the atomic Mass? 39.95 amu – How many Neutrons?
  393. 393. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? 18 • What is the atomic Mass? 39.95 amu – How many Neutrons?
  394. 394. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? 18 • What is the atomic Mass? 39.95 amu – How many Neutrons? 39.95
  395. 395. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? 18 • What is the atomic Mass? 39.95 amu – How many Neutrons? 39.95 -18 =
  396. 396. • What is the atomic symbol? Ar • What is the atomic number? 18 – How many Protons? 18 – How many Electrons? 18 • What is the atomic Mass? 39.95 amu – How many Neutrons? 39.95 -18 = 21.95
  397. 397. • Atoms worksheet available.
  398. 398. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  399. 399. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  400. 400. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  401. 401. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The number of Electrons is the Atoms Atomic #
  402. 402. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The number of Electrons is the Atoms Atomic #
  403. 403. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The number of Electrons is the Atoms Atomic # 6
  404. 404. • What is the atomic symbol? C (Carbon) • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The number of Electrons is the Atoms Atomic # 6
  405. 405. • What is the atomic symbol? C (Carbon) • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The number of Electrons is the Atoms Atomic # 6
  406. 406. • What is the atomic symbol? C • What is the atomic number? 6 – How many Protons? 6 – How many Electrons?6 • What is the atomic Mass? 12.01 amu – How many Neutrons? 6 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  407. 407. • Atoms worksheet available.
  408. 408. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  409. 409. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  410. 410. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  411. 411. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  412. 412. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  413. 413. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  414. 414. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? 3 – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  415. 415. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? 3 – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons?
  416. 416. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? 3 – How many Electrons? 3 • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  417. 417. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? 3 – How many Electrons? 3 • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  418. 418. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? 3 – How many Electrons? 3 • What is the atomic Mass? 6.94 amu – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  419. 419. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? 3 – How many Electrons? 3 • What is the atomic Mass? 6.94 amu – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  420. 420. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? 3 – How many Electrons? 3 • What is the atomic Mass? 6.94 amu – How many Neutrons? 3.94 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  421. 421. • What is the atomic symbol? Li • What is the atomic number? 3 – How many Protons? 3 – How many Electrons? 3 • What is the atomic Mass? 6.94 amu – How many Neutrons? 3.94 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  422. 422. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  423. 423. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  424. 424. • What is the atomic symbol? Fe • What is the atomic number? 26 – How many Protons? 26 – How many Electrons? 26 • What is the atomic Mass? 55.84 amu – How many Neutrons? 29.84 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  425. 425. • Atoms worksheet available.
  426. 426. • Atoms worksheet available.
  427. 427. • Meet the Elements Activity Sheet. – Periodic table needed – Complete the page on the back using your periodic table for the upcoming fun quiz.
  428. 428. Hydrogen Helium Neonn Krypton, Argon, Xenon, Helium Copper
  429. 429. Boron 5 N 7 Br 79.90 amu S Sulfur 32.065 Cs Cesium 132.91 Be Beryllium 9.01 Lead 207.20 Cl 35.45 amu Au 196.97 amu O Oxygen Ir Iridium 192.22 Neon 20.18 10879 82 17 35 No 102 Nobelium Zinc 65.41 30 H Hydrogen 1.01 1 Ca Calcium 20
  430. 430. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  431. 431. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  432. 432. • What is the atomic symbol? Zn • What is the atomic number? 30 – How many Protons? 30 – How many Electrons? 30 • What is the atomic Mass? 65.37 amu – How many Neutrons? 35 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  433. 433. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  434. 434. • What is the atomic symbol? • What is the atomic number? – How many Protons? – How many Electrons? • What is the atomic Mass? – How many Neutrons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  435. 435. • What is the atomic symbol? B • What is the atomic number? 5 – How many Protons? 5 – How many Electrons? 5 • What is the atomic Mass? 10.81 amu – How many Neutrons? 5.81 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  436. 436. • What is the atomic symbol? B • What is the atomic number? 5 – How many Protons? 5 – How many Electrons? 5 • What is the atomic Mass? 10.81 amu – How many Neutrons? 5.81 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  437. 437. • Class Quiz (1-10) – #10 We haven’t learned yet but give it a try. – http://www.mcwdn.org/chemist/atom/atomquiz.html + + + Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  438. 438. Hydrogen Helium Neonn Krypton, Argon, Xenon, Helium Copper Yttrium Tinn Krypton Francium Zinc, Neon, Gold, Lead Europium Americium Mercury, Plutonium, Uranium, Neptunium, Einsteinium Californium Nobelium Calcium Arsenic Mercury Tungsten Potassium
  439. 439. • Quiz Wiz! Exploring some of the Periodic Table because we have it out. – Have your Periodic Table of the Elements handy. Quiz Wiz for fun…. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  440. 440. • This element only has three letters in its name? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1
  441. 441. • These elements are a form of U.S. currency that we carry around? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2
  442. 442. • How many neutrons does the dangerous gas when spelled backwards spells “Nodar”? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 3
  443. 443. • How many neutrons does the dangerous gas when spelled backwards spells “Nodar”? – Note, this is the picture that came up when I Googled “Nodar” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 3
  444. 444. • What are the names of the two elements named after countries in Europe? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4
  445. 445. • What is the atomic number of the element named after a famous peace prize? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 5
  446. 446. • How many electrons are in the element named for a famous gold foil experiment? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 6
  447. 447. • Name at least two elements that names could be associated with a Planet or Dwarf Planet? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7
  448. 448. • What’s the atomic number that’s associated with my element? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 8
  449. 449. • I am a the only element named after a university in California? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 9
  450. 450. • This is the only element named after a U.S. State? 10
  451. 451. • Bonus - If any element existed that could destroy superman, it would be… – This is just movie stuff and the element is a gas in real life? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  452. 452. • Answers to the Quiz Wiz – Exploring the Periodic Table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  453. 453. • This element only has three letters in its name?
  454. 454. • This element only has three letters in its name? Tin # 50, Symbol Sn Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1
  455. 455. • These elements are a form of U.S. currency that we carry around? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2
  456. 456. • These elements are a form of U.S. currency that we carry around? Nickel #28, Ni Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2
  457. 457. • These elements are a form of U.S. currency that we carry around? Also Gold Au #79 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2
  458. 458. • These elements are a form of U.S. currency that we carry around? Also Gold Au #79 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2
  459. 459. • How many neutrons does the dangerous gas when spelled backwards spells “Nodar”? – Note, this is the picture that came up when I searched “Nodar” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 3
  460. 460. • How many neutrons does the dangerous gas when spelled backwards spells “Nodar”? Radon, #86, – Note, this is the picture that came up when I searched “Nodar” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 3
  461. 461. • How many neutrons does the dangerous gas when spelled backwards spells “Nodar”? Radon, #86, amu=222 • 222 - 86 = 136 Neutrons – Note, this is the picture that came up when I searched “Nodar” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 3
  462. 462. • How many neutrons does the dangerous gas when spelled backwards spells “Nodar”? Radon, #86, amu=222 • 222 - 86 = 136 Neutrons – Note, this is the picture that came up when I searched “Nodar” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 3
  463. 463. • What are the names of the two elements named after countries in Europe? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4
  464. 464. • What are the names of the two elements named after countries in Europe? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4
  465. 465. • What are the names of the two elements named after countries in Europe? – Francium #87, Fr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4
  466. 466. • What are the names of the two elements named after countries in Europe? – Francium #87, Fr – Germanium #32, Ge Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4
  467. 467. • What is the atomic number of the element named after a famous peace prize? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 5
  468. 468. • What is the atomic number of the element named after a famous peace prize? – Nobelium, #102, No – The Nobel Peace Prize Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 5
  469. 469. • What is the atomic number of the element named after a famous peace prize? – Nobelium, #102, No – The Nobel Peace Prize Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 5
  470. 470. • How many electrons are in the element named for a famous gold foil experiment? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 6
  471. 471. • How many electrons are in the element named for a famous gold foil experiment? Rutherfordium, #104, Rf Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 6
  472. 472. • How many electrons are in the element named for a famous gold foil experiment? Rutherfordium, #104, Rf • 104 Electrons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 6
  473. 473. • Name at least two elements that names could be associated with a Planet or Dwarf Planet? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7
  474. 474. • Name at least two elements that names could be associated with a Planet or Dwarf Planet? – Mercury, #80, Hg Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7
  475. 475. • Name at least two elements that names could be associated with a Planet or Dwarf Planet? – Mercury, #80, Hg – Plutonium, #94, Pu Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7
  476. 476. • Name at least two elements that names could be associated with a Planet or Dwarf Planet? – Mercury, #80, Hg – Plutonium, #94, Pu – Uranium, #92, U Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7
  477. 477. • Name at least two elements that names could be associated with a Planet or Dwarf Planet? – Mercury, #80, Hg – Plutonium, #94, Pu – Uranium, #92, U – Neptunium, #93, Np Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7
  478. 478. • Name at least two elements that names could be associated with a Planet or Dwarf Planet? – Mercury, #80, Hg – Plutonium, #94, Pu – Uranium, #92, U – Neptunium, #93, Np Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 7Also Tellerium “Earth” #52 Te
  479. 479. • What is the atomic number that associated with my element? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  480. 480. • What is the atomic number that associated with my element? 99, Einsteinium, #99, Es Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 8
  481. 481. • I am a the only element named after a university in California? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  482. 482. • I am a the only element named after a university in California? Berkelium, #97, Bk Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 9
  483. 483. • This is the only element named after a U.S. State? 10
  484. 484. • This is the only element named after a U.S. State? Californium, #98, Cf 10
  485. 485. • Bonus - If any element existed that could destroy superman, it would be…, although this is just movie stuff and the element is a gas in real life? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  486. 486. • Bonus - If any element existed that could destroy superman, it would be…, although this is just movie stuff and the element is a gas in real life? • Krypton, #36, Kr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  487. 487. • Activity Sheet Available: Meet the Elements. A Nice Review.
  488. 488. • Video Link! Nucleus Crash Course. – (Optional and Advanced) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSyAehMdpyI& list=PL8dPuuaLjXtPHzzYuWy6fYEaX9mQQ8oGr
  489. 489. • Try and be the first to figure out the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know, you only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  490. 490. Xenon
  491. 491. • Try Again! Be the first to figure out the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know, you only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  492. 492. Ernest Rutherford
  493. 493. • Try Again! Be the first to figure out the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know, you only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  494. 494. Can you guess the atom based on the number of orbiting electrons?
  495. 495. The energy involved in the binding together of the nucleons effects the mass of the atom and is known as the mass deficit
  496. 496. • Try Again! Can you name the picture hidden beneath the boxes? – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. – These two box games are work bonus points on the balancing chemical equations sheet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  497. 497. Lithium Atomic Number #3
  498. 498. Lithium Atomic Number #3 3 Electrons 3 Protons 4 Neutrons
  499. 499. • You should have completed page 2 of the bundled homework package.
  500. 500. • You should have completed page 2 of the bundled homework package.
  501. 501. • You can also complete this portion of the homework
  502. 502. • You can now neatly label in the white spaces around each picture and color as desired to the following…
  503. 503. • Video Link! History of the Atom. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njGz69B_p Ug
  504. 504. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up (school dress code enforced) with hand made costume) – Must choose one element from the Periodic Table of Elements – You must support your character with at least 8 factoids / characteristics / uses of that element. – Be prepared to present. Presentation is a part of your grade so get creative. – Learn more about Cosplay at… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosplay
  505. 505. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up (school dress code enforced) with hand made costume) – Must choose one element from the Periodic Table of Elements – You must support your character with at least 8 factoids / characteristics / uses of that element. – Be prepared to present. Presentation is a part of your grade so get creative. – Learn more about Cosplay at… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosplay
  506. 506. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or
  507. 507. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up with hand made costumes).
  508. 508. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up with hand made costumes).
  509. 509. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up with hand made costumes). Lots of information written all around the character with element specifics
  510. 510. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up with hand made costumes). • No toy or real weapons, school dress code enforced!
  511. 511. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up with hand made costumes). • No toy or real weapons, school dress code enforced! – Must choose one element from the Periodic Table of Elements – You must support your character with at least 8 factoids / characteristics / uses of that element. – Be prepared to present. Presentation is a part of your grade so get creative. – Learn more about Cosplay at… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosplay
  512. 512. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up with hand made costumes). • No toy or real weapons, school dress code enforced! – Must choose one element from the Periodic Table of Elements – You must support your character with at least 8 factoids / characteristics / uses of that element. – Be prepared to present. Presentation is a part of your grade so get creative. – Learn more about Cosplay at… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosplay
  513. 513. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up with hand made costumes). • No toy or real weapons, school dress code enforced! – Must choose one element from the Periodic Table of Elements – You must support your character with at least 8 factoids / characteristics / uses of that element.
  514. 514. • Possible Project (3 weeks from now) – Element Cosplay (Create composite sketch or dress-up with hand made costumes). • No toy or real weapons, school dress code enforced! – Must choose one element from the Periodic Table of Elements – You must support your character with at least 8 factoids / characteristics / uses of that element. – Be prepared to present. Presentation is a part of your grade so get creative. • Learn more about Cosplay at… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosplay Note: Image search for Cosplay not recommend as some cosplayers wear revealing costumes.
  515. 515. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tst Please visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet
  516. 516. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to and NSTA) • http://www.sciencedaily.com/ • http://www.sciencemag.org/ • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
  517. 517. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  518. 518. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Areas of Focus within The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit: Atoms (Atomic Force Microscopes), Rutherford’s Gold Foil Experiment, Cathode Tube, Atoms, Fundamental Particles, The Nucleus, Isotopes, AMU, Size of Atoms and Particles, Quarks, Recipe of the Universe, Atomic Theory, Atomic Symbols, #’;s, Valence Electrons, Octet Rule, SPONCH Atoms, Molecules, Hydrocarbons (Structure), Alcohols (Structure), Proteins (Structure), Atomic Bonds, Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Metallic Bonds, , Precipitation Reactions, Acids and Bases, Electron Negativity, Polar Bonds, Chemical Change, Exothermic Reactions, Endothermic Reactions, Laws Conservation of Matter, Balancing Chemical Equations, Oxidation and Reduction, Periodic Table of the Elements, Organization of Periodic Table, Transition Metals, Acids and Bases, Non-Metals, Metals, Metalloids, Ionization.
  519. 519. • This PowerPoint roadmap is one small part of my Atoms and Periodic Table Unit. • This unit includes a four part 2000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap. • 13 page bundled homework that chronologically follows slideshow • 14 pages of unit notes with visuals. • 3 PowerPoint review games. • Activity sheets, rubrics, advice page, curriculum guide, materials list, and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  520. 520. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  521. 521. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  522. 522. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  523. 523. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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