• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Forces in Motion PowerPoint, Velocity, Speed, Momentum, Work, Lesson
 

Forces in Motion PowerPoint, Velocity, Speed, Momentum, Work, Lesson

on

  • 564 views

A three part 1500+ PowerPoint slideshow from www.sciencepowerpoint.com becomes the roadmap for an interactive and amazing science experience that includes a bundled homework package, answer keys, unit ...

A three part 1500+ PowerPoint slideshow from www.sciencepowerpoint.com becomes the roadmap for an interactive and amazing science experience that includes a bundled homework package, answer keys, unit notes, video links, review games, built-in quizzes and hands-on activities, worksheets, rubrics, games, and much more.
Also included are instruction to create a student version of the unit that is much like the teachers but missing the answer keys, quizzes, PowerPoint review games, hidden box challenges, owl, and surprises meant for the classroom. This is a great resource to distribute to your students and support professionals.
Text for the unit PowerPoint is presented in large print (32 font) and is placed at the top of each slide so it can seen and read from all angles of a classroom. A shade technique, as well as color coded text helps to increase student focus and allows teacher to control the pace of the lesson. Also included is a 12 page assessment / bundled homework that chronologically follows the slideshow for nightly homework and the end of the unit assessment, as well as a 8 page modified assessment. 9 pages of class notes with images are also included for students who require assistance, as well as answer keys to both of the assessments for support professionals, teachers, and homeschool parents. Many video links are provided and a slide within the slideshow cues teacher / parent when the videos are most relevant to play. Video shorts usually range from 2-7 minutes and are included in organized folders. Two PowerPoint Review games are included. Answers to the PowerPoint Review Games are provided in PowerPoint form so students can self-assess. Lastly, several class games such as guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes, and the find the hidden owl somewhere within the slideshow are provided. Difficulty rating of 8 (Ten is most difficult).
Areas of Focus: -Newton's First Law, Inertia, Friction, Four Types of Friction, Negatives and Positives of Friction, Newton's Third Law, Newton's Second Law, Potential Energy, Kinetic Energy, Mechanical Energy, Forms of Potential to Kinetic Energy, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration, Deceleration, Momentum, Work, Machines (Joules), Catapults, Trajectory, Force, Simple Machines, Pulley / (MA Mechanical Advantage), Lever /(MA),Wedge /(MA), Wheel and Axle (MA), Inclined Plane / (MA), Screw /(MA).
This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

Statistics

Views

Total Views
564
Views on SlideShare
564
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Forces in Motion PowerPoint, Velocity, Speed, Momentum, Work, Lesson Forces in Motion PowerPoint, Velocity, Speed, Momentum, Work, Lesson Presentation Transcript

    • • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Resistance Arm Effort Arm
    • • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Keep an eye out for “The-Owl” and raise your hand as soon as you see him. – He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Keep an eye out for “The-Owl” and raise your hand as soon as you see him. – He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow “Hoot, Hoot” “Good Luck!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    •  Potential Energy: (PE) The energy stored by an object as a result of its position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Potential Enegy (PE) Kinetic Energy (KE)
    • Potential Enegy (PE) Kinetic Energy (KE)
    • Potential Enegy (PE) Kinetic Energy (KE)
    •  Potential Energy is the energy of position. Objects that are elevated have a high potential energy.  Kinetic Energy is the energy of motion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Potential Energy is the energy of position. Objects that are elevated have a high potential energy.  Kinetic Energy is the energy of motion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Potential Energy is the energy of position. Objects that are elevated have a high potential energy.  Kinetic Energy is the energy of motion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    • • Activity! Please write and plan on sharing a sentence about PE and KE about the animation below. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Please write and plan on sharing a sentence about PE and KE about the animation below. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The monkey has potential energy because of its position in the tree. When she lets go her potential energy is transferred into the energy of motion (KE). and Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The monkey has potential energy because of its position in the tree. When he lets go his potential energy is transferred into the energy of motion (KE). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Video Link! (Optional) Energy changes, Potential and Kinetic Energy. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jnj8mc04r9E
    • • Activity! PE – KE Skateboarder Simulator • Search Phet Skate Board Demo. • Download program (Free) http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/energy -skate-park Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  PE = mgh Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  PE = mgh  PE = Energy (in Joules) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  PE = mgh  PE = Energy (in Joules)  m = mass (in kilograms) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  PE = mgh  PE = Energy (in Joules)  m = mass (in kilograms)  g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/s²) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  PE = mgh  PE = Energy (in Joules)  m = mass (in kilograms)  g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/s²)  h = height above Earth's surface (in meters) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  PE = mgh  PE = Energy (in Joules)  m = mass (in kilograms)  g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/s²)  h = height above Earth's surface (in meters) Learn more about Potential Energy at… http://www.physicsclassroom.com/clas s/energy/u5l1b.cfm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    • • Calculate the potential energy for a 2 kg basketball dropping from a height of 3.5 meters with a velocity of 9.8 m / sec². – Find the PE in Joules? PE=mgh Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Calculate the potential energy for a 2 kg basketball dropping from a height of 3.5 meters with a velocity of 9.8 m / s². – Find the PE in Joules? PE=mgh Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Calculate the potential energy for a 2 kg basketball dropping from a height of 3.5 meters with a velocity of 9.8 m / s². – Find the PE in Joules? PE=mgh Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2 kg g = 9.8 m/sec2 h = 3.5 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2 kg g = 9.8 m/sec2 h = 3.5 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h = 3.5 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h = 3.5 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h = 3.5 m • PE = (2 kg ) (9.8 m/s²) (3.5 m) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h = 3.5 m • PE = (2 kg ) (9.8 m/s²) (3.5 m) • PE = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h = 3.5 m • PE = (2 kg ) (9.8 m/s²) (3.5 m) • PE = 68.6 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    • • Calculate the potential energy of a shot put dropping from a height of 6 meters weighing 5.44 kg with a velocity of 9.8 m/s². – Find the PE in Joules? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Calculate the potential energy of a shot put dropping from a height of 6 meters weighing 5.44 kg with a velocity of 9.8 m/s². – Find the PE in Joules? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Calculate the potential energy of a shot put dropping from a height of 6 meters weighing 5.44 kg with a velocity of 9.8 m/s². – Find the PE in Joules? PE=mgh Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 5.44 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h=6m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 5.44 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h=6m PE = (5.44kg) (9.8m/s²) (6m) PE = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: PE = 319.87 Joules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: PE = 319.87 Joules. • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping!
    • • Activity! But we will use an egg. Egg
    • • Activity! and It’s not a real egg, it’s plastic.
    • • Activity! …and instead of candy...
    • • Activity! …and instead of candy...it’s washers
    • Demonstration of bungee jump gone wrong by teacher. This is not what you want to happen to your plastic egg.
    • Paperclip to Hook on ceiling
    • Paperclip to Hook on ceiling String (You create length)
    • Paperclip to Hook on ceiling String (You create length) Elastic
    • Paperclip to Hook on ceiling String (You create length) 2 Washers Elastic
    • Paperclip to Hook on ceiling String (You create length) 2 Washers Elastic Egg
    • Paperclip to Hook on ceiling String (You create length) 2 Washers Elastic Egg
    • Paperclip to Hook on ceiling String (You create length) 2 Washers Elastic Egg
    • • Bungee Jumping Egg Available Worksheet
    • Demonstration of bungee jump gone wrong by teacher. This is not what you want to happen to your plastic egg.
    • • The five values that should be considered before determining the fate of the egg. – Height of the jump 2.75 m / 9 ft. – Length of unstretched elastic band 80 cm / 2’8” – Spring constant (How much the band stretches) – Mass of the egg and washers – Length of rope. – Height of jump (h) minus the separation distance (d) between the egg and ground including the stretched elastic.
    • • The five values that should be considered before determining the fate of the egg. – Height of the jump 2.75 m / 9 ft. – Length of unstretched elastic band 80 cm / 2’8” – Spring constant (How much the band stretches) – Mass of the egg and washers – Length of rope. – Height of jump (h) minus the separation distance (d) between the egg and ground including the stretched elastic.
    • • The five values that should be considered before determining the fate of the egg. – Height of the jump 2.75 m / 9 ft. – Length of elastic band 80 cm / 2’8” ish. – Spring constant (How much the band stretches) – Mass of the egg and washers – Length of rope. – Height of jump (h) minus the separation distance (d) between the egg and ground including the stretched elastic.
    • • The five values that should be considered before determining the fate of the egg. – Height of the jump 2.75 m / 9 ft. – Length of elastic band 80 cm / 2’8” ish. – Spring constant (How much the band stretches). – Mass of the egg and washers – Length of rope. – Height of jump (h) minus the separation distance (d) between the egg and ground including the stretched elastic.
    • • The five values that should be considered before determining the fate of the egg. – Height of the jump 2.75 m / 9 ft. – Length of elastic band 80 cm / 2’8” ish. – Spring constant (How much the band stretches). – Mass of the egg and washers Constant: Changeless / unvarying – Length of rope. in of jump – Height nature (h) minus the separation distance (d) between the egg and ground including the stretched elastic.
    • • The five values that should be considered before determining the fate of the egg. – Height of the jump 2.75 m / 9 ft. – Length of elastic band 80 cm / 2’8” ish. – Spring constant (How much the band stretches). – Mass of the egg and washers. – Length of rope. – Height of jump (h) minus the separation distance (d) between the egg and ground including the stretched elastic.
    • • The five values that should be considered before determining the fate of the egg. – Height of the jump 2.75 m / 9 ft. – Length of elastic band 80 cm / 2’8” ish. – Spring constant (How much the band stretches). – Mass of the egg and washers. – Length of rope.  Mass: Amount of matter in an – Height of jump (h) minus the separation distance (d) between the egg and ground object (Weight on Earth) including the stretched elastic.
    • • The five values that should be considered before determining the fate of the egg. – Height of the jump 2.75 m / 9 ft. – Length of elastic band 80 cm / 2’8” ish. – Spring constant (How much the band stretches). – Mass of the egg and washers. – Length of string that you determine. – Height of jump (h) minus the separation distance (d) between the egg and ground including the stretched elastic.
    • • The five values that should be considered before determining the fate of the egg. – Height of the jump 2.75 m / 9 ft. – Length of elastic band 80 cm / 2’8” ish. – Spring constant (How much the band stretches). – Mass of the egg and washers. – Length of string that you determine. – Height of jump (h) minus the separation distance (d) between the egg and ground including the stretched elastic.
    • • Activity! Instructions
    • • Activity! Instructions • Goal: For the egg to fall from the ceiling and come within 10 cm of the floor without crashing.
    • • Activity! Instructions • Goal: For the egg to fall from the ceiling and come within 10 cm of the floor without crashing. • Everyone has the same amount of bungee material (Elastic / Rubber Bands)
    • • Activity! Instructions • Goal: For the egg to fall from the ceiling and come within 10 cm of the floor without crashing. • Everyone has the same amount of bungee material (Elastic / Rubber Bands) • You must measure the correct length of rope to land within the 10 cm range.
    • • Activity! Instructions • Goal: For the egg to fall from the ceiling and come within 10 cm of the floor without crashing. • Everyone has the same amount of bungee material (Elastic / Rubber Bands) • You must measure the correct length of rope to land within the 10 cm range. • You are not allowed any test jumps. You must determine rope length using the provided information.
    • • Activity! Instructions • Goal: For the egg to fall from the ceiling and come within 10 cm of the floor without crashing. • Everyone has the same amount of bungee material (Elastic / Rubber Bands) • You must measure the correct length of rope to land within the 10 cm range. • You are not allowed any test jumps. You must determine rope length using the provided information. • You may begin when given the materials and use the information on the next slide.
    • • • • • • • • • Activity! Information Height 2.75 m / 9ft Paperclip 5 cm? Hook 5 cm? Elastic not stretched 80 cm / 2’8” ish. Mass of egg and 2 washers = 32grams 32g x .001 =.032kg Stretched Elastic = ?
    • • • • • • • • • • Activity! Information Height 2.75 m / 9ft Paperclip 5 cm? Hook 5 cm? Elastic not stretched 80 cm / 2’8” ish. Mass of egg and 2 washers = 32grams 32g x .001 =.032kg Stretched Elastic = ? Potential Energy = PE = mgh
    • • • • • • • • • • • Activity! Information Height 2.75 m / 9ft Paperclip 5 cm? Hook 5 cm? Elastic not stretched 80 cm / 2’8” ish. Mass of egg and 2 washers = 32grams 32g x .001 =.032kg Stretched Elastic = ? Potential Energy = PE = mgh PE is in Joules
    • • • • • • • • • • • Activity! Information Height 2.75 m / 9ft Paperclip 5 cm? Hook 5 cm? Elastic not stretched 80 cm / 2’8” ish. Mass of egg and 2 washers = 32grams 32g x .001 =.032kg Stretched Elastic = ? Potential Energy = PE = mgh PE is in Joules
    • • • • • • • • • • • Activity! Information Height 2.75 m / 9ft Paperclip 5 cm? Hook 5 cm? Elastic not stretched 80 cm / 2’8” ish. Mass of egg and 2 washers = 32grams 32g x .001 =.032kg Stretched Elastic = ? Potential Energy = PE = mgh PE is in Joules – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) – g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/sec2) – Height above surface (Meters)
    • • • • • • • • • • • Activity! Information Height 2.75 m / 9ft Paperclip 5 cm? Hook 5 cm? Elastic not stretched 80 cm / 2’8” ish. Mass of egg and 2 washers = 32grams 32g x .001 =.032kg Stretched Elastic = ? Potential Energy = PE = mgh PE is in Joules – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) – g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/s²) – Height above surface (Meters)
    • • • • • • • • • • • Activity! Information Height 2.75 m / 9ft Paperclip 5 cm? Hook 5 cm? Elastic not stretched 80 cm / 2’8” ish. Mass of egg and 2 washers = 32grams 32g x .001 =.032kg Stretched Elastic = ? Potential Energy = PE = mgh PE is in Joules – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) – g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/s²) – Height above surface (Meters)
    • • Follow up questions. – What did you learn in this activity? • Please draw a quick sketch of a bungee jumping egg with a short description of something you learned next to it. – If your egg cracked your picture must show this.
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy:
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another.
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another.
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another.
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another.
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another.
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another.
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another.
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another. • The egg moves,
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another. • The egg moves, makes a sound,
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another. • The egg moves, makes a sound, must move air molecules,
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another. • The egg moves, makes a sound, must move air molecules, cracks,
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another. • The egg moves, makes a sound, must move air molecules, cracks, the washers move across the floor,
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another. • The egg moves, makes a sound, must move air molecules, cracks, the washers move across the floor, the string and elastic heat up,
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another. • The egg moves, makes a sound, must move air molecules, cracks, the washers move across the floor, the string and elastic heat up, stretch,
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Law Conservation of Energy: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted between one form and another. • The egg moves, makes a sound, must move air molecules, cracks, the washers move across the floor, the string and elastic heat up, stretch, others?
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – During a bungee jump, the stored potential energy of the egg (PE = mgh) is converted into kinetic energy during the fall (KE = ½ MV²).
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – During a bungee jump, the stored potential energy of the egg (PE = mgh) is converted into kinetic energy during the fall (KE = ½ MV²). • The kinetic energy is converted back to potential energy as the bungee cord stretches.
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh • PE is in Joules – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) – g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/sec2) – Height above surface (Meters)
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh • PE is in Joules – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) – g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/sec2) – Height above surface (Meters)
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh • PE is in Joules – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) – g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/sec2) – Height above surface (Meters)
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh • PE is in Joules – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) – g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/sec2) – Height above surface (Meters)
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh • PE is in Joules – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) – g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/sec2) – Height above surface (Meters)
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh • PE is in Joules – – – – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/s²) ) Height above surface (Meters)
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh • PE is in Joules – Mass of the Object (Kilograms) – g = gravitational acceleration of the earth (9.8 m/s²) – Height above surface (Meters)
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m .032 kg
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m g .032 kg
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m g .032 kg 9.8 m/s²
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m g h .032 kg 9.8 m/s²
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m g h .032 kg 9.8 m/s² 2.75 M
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m g h .032 kg 9.8 m/s² 2.75 M
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m g h .032 kg 9.8 m/s² 2.75 M PE= .032 kg 9.8m/s² 2.75 M
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m g h .032 kg 9.8 m/s² 2.75 M PE= .032 kg 9.8m/s² 2.75 M PE =
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – The Potential Energy of the Egg • Potential Energy = PE = mgh – (m)ass of the egg and washers + Elastic + String = .032kg – (g) = (9.8 m/s²) – (h) Height = 2.75 Meters m g h .032 kg 9.8 m/s² 2.75 M PE= .032 kg 9.8m/s² 2.75 M PE = .86 Joules
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Hooke’s Law:
    • • Activity! Bungee Jumping Egg Information – Hooke’s Law: The force produced by the stretched spring is directly proportional to the distance the spring is stretched compared to its unstretched state F = -kx
    • • Video Link! (Optional) • Potential and Kinetic Energy • Be a proactive learner and record problems in your journal. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSWl_Zj-CZs
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    • • Calculate the potential energy for a 2500 kg satellite orbiting at an altitude of 50,000 meters above the surface of the earth if it is traveling with a velocity of 9.8 m/s². Find PE in Joules? – Assume we are using the earth gravity constant.
    • • Calculate the potential energy for a 2500 kg satellite orbiting at an altitude of 50,000 meters above the surface of the earth if it is traveling with a velocity of 9.8 m/s². Find PE in Joules? – Assume we are using the earth gravity constant.
    • • Calculate the potential energy for a 2500 kg satellite orbiting at an altitude of 50,000 meters above the surface of the earth if it is traveling with a velocity of 9.8 m/s². Find PE in Joules? PE=mgh – Assume we are using the earth gravity constant.
    • • Calculate the potential energy for a 2500 kg satellite orbiting at an altitude of 50,000 meters above the surface of the earth if it is traveling with a velocity of 9.8 m/s². Find PE in Joules? PE=mgh – Assume we are using the earth gravity constant.
    • • PE = mgh m = 2500 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h = 50,000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2500 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h = 50,000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2500 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h = 50,000m • PE = (2500 kg) (9.8 m/s²) (50,000 m) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • PE = mgh m = 2500 kg g = 9.8 m/s² h = 50,000m • PE = (2500 kg) (9.8 m/s²) (50,000 m) • PE = ? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Or PE = 1,225,000,000 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Or PE = 1,225,000,000 Joules • Can you put it into scientific notation? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Or PE = 1,225,000,000 Joules 9 • Can you put it into scientific notation? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Or PE = 1,225,000,000 Joules 9 • Can you put it into scientific notation? • PE = 1.225 x 109 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Scientific Notation PowerPoint and worksheet provided in the Activities Folder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Gravity: The force of attraction between all masses in the universe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Gravity: The force of attraction between all masses in the universe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Gravity: The force of attraction between all masses in the universe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Gravity: The force of attraction between all masses in the universe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Gravity: The force of attraction between all masses in the universe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Law of Gravity F = G M m / r^2 – Gravity is an attractive force between two bodies, which depends only on the mass of the two bodies (M and m) and inversely on the square of the separation between the two bodies. – (If you double the mass of the earth, its gravitational force will become twice as big; if you get 3 times further away from the earth, its gravitational force will be 3 times weaker.) If interested in some difficult mathematics visit… http://easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/learn-newtons-law.php
    • • Which one is the relative gravity of Jupiter? – Earth's force of gravity is measured at 1.00
    • • Which one is the relative gravity of Jupiter? – Earth's force of gravity is measured at 1.00
    • • Which one is the relative gravity of Jupiter? – Earth's force of gravity is measured at 1.00
    • • Question. – If the sun were to be shrunk into the size of a basketball without losing any mass, would it have more, less, or the same gravitational effects it has now?
    • • Question. Answer… – If the sun were to be shrunk into the size of a basketball without losing any mass, would it have more, less, or the same gravitational effects it has now?
    • • Question. Answer… – If the sun were to be shrunk into the size of a basketball without losing any mass, would it have more, less, or the same gravitational effects it has now?
    • • Question. Answer… – If the sun were to be shrunk into the size of a basketball without losing any mass, would it have more, less, or the same gravitational effects it has now?
    • • Question. Answer… – If the sun were to be shrunk into the size of a basketball without losing any mass, would it have more, less, or the same gravitational effects it has now? Learn more (Advanced) at… http://www2.astro.psu.edu/users/caryl/a10/lec4_2d.html
    • • In rocketry we can use gravity to speed up an object and change directions
    • • In rocketry we can use gravity to speed up an object and change directions
    • • Gravity of the earth keeps the moon from going into deep space,
    • • Gravity of the earth keeps the moon from going into deep space, gravity of the sun keeps the earth in orbit,
    • • Gravity of the earth keeps the moon from going into deep space, gravity of the sun keeps the earth in orbit, and gravity of our galaxy keeps sun from heading into deep space.
    • • The Apollo missions used the gravitational pull of the earth and moon to slingshot / gain velocity.
    • • Video Link! Gravity in a minute – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jk5E-CrE1zg
    • • Black holes, space-time, Einstein, and relativity optional PowerPoint in activities folder.
    •  Kinetic energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Kinetic energy  The energy that matter has because of its motion and mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Kinetic energy  The energy that matter has because of its motion and mass.  Where m = mass of object (kg). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Kinetic energy  The energy that matter has because of its motion and mass.  Where m = mass of object (kg).  v = speed of object. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Kinetic energy  The energy that matter has because of its motion and mass.  Where m = mass of object (kg).  v = speed of object.  KE = Energy in Joules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Kinetic energy – The energy that matter has because of its This equation shows that the kinetic energy of motion and mass. an object is proportional to the square of its Where m = a twofold increase in speed, – speed. For mass of object (kg). the kinetic energy will increase by a factor of – v = speed of object. four. – KE = Energy in Joules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Kinetic energy – The energy that matter has because of its This equation shows that the kinetic energy of motion and mass. an object is proportional to the square of its Where m = a twofold increase in velocity, – speed. For mass of object (kg). the kinetic energy will increase by a factor of – v = speed of object. four. – KE = Energy in Joules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Kinetic energy - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Kinetic Energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Kinetic Energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Translational Energy: Motion from one location to another.
    •  Vibrational energy (sound)
    •  Electrical energy: Flow of electrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Rotational energy.
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction.
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude Scalars and Vectors. Learn more at… http://www.grc. nasa.gov/WWW /k12/airplane/vect ors.html
    • • How you can remember the difference between the two…
    • • How you can remember the difference between the two… Scales are still / Don’t have direction
    • • How you can remember the difference between the two… Scales are still / Don’t have direction Just a cool fighter pilot name, Jet Pilots travel with direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • F=ma – (Which is are scalars and which are vectors?)
    • • F=ma – (Which is are scalars and which are vectors?)
    • • F=ma – (Which is are scalars and which are vectors?) Force has magnitude and direction
    • • F=ma – (Which is are scalars and which are vectors?) Force has magnitude and direction
    • • F=ma – (Which is are scalars and which are vectors?) Force has magnitude and direction Mass: Magnitude Only
    • • F=ma – (Which is are scalars and which are vectors?) Force has magnitude and direction Mass: Magnitude Only
    • • F=ma – (Which is are scalars and which are vectors?) Acceleration has magnitude and direction Force has magnitude and direction Mass: Magnitude Only
    • • Amount of KE depends on both the objects mass and its velocity / (speed). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Amount of KE depends on both the objects mass and its velocity / (speed). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Amount of KE depends on both the objects mass and its velocity / (speed). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Amount of KE depends on both the objects mass and its velocity / (speed). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Amount of KE depends on both the objects mass and its velocity / (speed). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    • • What is the kinetic energy of a 10 kilogram cannon ball traveling at 50 meters per second? • m = 10 kg • v = 50 m/s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the kinetic energy of a 10 kilogram cannon ball traveling at 50 meters per second? • m = 10 kg • v = 50 m/s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the kinetic energy of a 10 kilogram cannon ball traveling at 50 meters per second? • m = 10 kg • v = 50 m/s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Don’t forget your order of operations. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Don’t forget your order of operations. • PEMDAS Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Don’t forget your order of operations. • PEMDAS • For KE, you must do exponents (E) before multiplying (M). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Don’t forget your order of operations. • PEMDAS • For KE, you must do exponents (E) before multiplying (M). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Don’t forget your order of operations. • PEMDAS • For KE, you must do exponents (E) before multiplying (M). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times (50) ² Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times (50) ² Joules • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times 2,500 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times (50) ² Joules • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times 2,500 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times (50) ² Joules • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times 2,500 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times (50) ² Joules • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times 2,500 Joules • KE = 5 kg times 2,500 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • • • • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times (50) ² Joules KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times 2,500 Joules KE = 5 kg times 2,500 Joules KE = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • • • • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times (50) ² Joules KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times 2,500 Joules KE = 5 kg times 2,500 Joules KE = 12,500 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • • • • KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times (50) ² Joules KE = 0.5 times 10 kg times 2,500 Joules KE = 5 kg times 2,500 Joules KE = 12,500 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    • • What is the kinetic energy of a .142 kilogram baseball traveling at 45 meters per second? • m = .142 kg • v = 45 m/s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the kinetic energy of a .142 kilogram baseball traveling at 45 meters per second? • m = .142 kg • v = 45 m/s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times (45) ² Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times (45) ² Joules • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times 2,025 Joules PEMDAS Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times (45) ² Joules • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times 2,025 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times (45) ² Joules • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times 2,025 Joules • KE = .071 kg times 2,025 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • • • • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times (45) ² Joules KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times 2,025 Joules KE = .071 kg times 2,025 Joules KE = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • • • • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times (45) ² Joules KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times 2,025 Joules KE = .071 kg times 2,025 Joules KE = 143.775 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • • • • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times (45) ² Joules KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times 2,025 Joules KE = .071 kg times 2,025 Joules KE = 143.775 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • • • • KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times (45) ² Joules KE = 0.5 times .142 kg times 2,025 Joules KE = .071 kg times 2,025 Joules KE = 143.775 Joules Kinetic Energy, Learn more at… http://www.physicsclassroom .com/class/energy/u5l1c.cfm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Mechanical Energy (ME): Energy due to position and motion. - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Mechanical Energy (ME): Energy due to position and motion.  Sum of potential and kinetic energies, includes heat and friction. PE + KE = ME Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Available worksheet, PE, KE, and ME.
    • • A ski jumper moving down the hill had a Potential Energy of 10,500 Joules, and a Kinetic Energy of 6,500 Joules. – What is her Mechanical Energy?
    • • A ski jumper moving down the hill had a Potential Energy of 10,500 Joules, and a Kinetic Energy of 6,500 Joules. – What is her Mechanical Energy?
    • • A ski jumper moving down the hill had a Potential Energy of 10,500 Joules, and a Kinetic Energy of 6,500 Joules. – What is her Mechanical Energy?
    • • A ski jumper moving down the hill had a Potential Energy of 10,500 Joules, and a Kinetic Energy of 6,500 Joules. – What is her Mechanical Energy? ME = PE + KE
    • • A ski jumper moving down the hill had a Potential Energy of 10,500 Joules, and a Kinetic Energy of 6,500 Joules. – What is her Mechanical Energy? ME = PE + KE ME = 10,500 J + 6,500 J
    • • A ski jumper moving down the hill had a Potential Energy of 10,500 Joules, and a Kinetic Energy of 6,500 Joules. – What is her Mechanical Energy? ME = PE + KE ME = 10,500 J + 6,500 J ME =
    • • A ski jumper moving down the hill had a Potential Energy of 10,500 Joules, and a Kinetic Energy of 6,500 Joules. – What is her Mechanical Energy? ME = PE + KE ME = 10,500 J + 6,500 J ME = 17,000 Joules.
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. The run into the vault was 8.3 m/s and they weighed 77 kilograms. – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. The run into the vault was 8.3 m/s and they weighed 77 kilograms. KE= ½ m * V² – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. The run into the vault was 8.3 m/s and they weighed 77 kilograms. KE= ½ m * V² (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. The run into the vault was 8.3 m/s and they weighed 77 kilograms. KE= ½ m * V2 – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) “The homework isn’t color coded.”
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. The run into the vault was 8.3 m/s and they weighed 77 kilograms. KE= ½ m * V² – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. The run into the vault was 8.3 m/s and they weighed 77 kilograms. KE= ½ m * V² – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) KE KE KE KE = ½ m * V² = = =
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. The run into the vault was 8.3 m/s and they weighed 77 kilograms. KE= ½ m * V² – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) KE KE KE KE = ½ m * V² = .5* 77 kg * 8.3 m/s = =
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. The run into the vault was 8.3 m/s and they weighed 77 kilograms. KE= ½ m * V² – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) KE KE KE KE = ½ m * V² = .5* 77 kg * 8.3 m/s = .5* 77 kg * 68.89 m/s =
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. The run into the vault was 8.3 m/s and they weighed 77 kilograms. KE= ½ m * V² – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) KE KE KE KE = = = = ½ m * V² .5* 77 kg * 8.3 m/s .5* 77 kg * 68.89 m/s 2652.2 Joules
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.)
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) “Organize your work please.”
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) PE= mgh
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) PE= mgh PE = 77 kg* 9.8 m/s² * 3 m
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) PE= mgh PE = 77 kg* 9.8 m/s² * 3 m PE = 2263.8 Joules
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) PE= mgh PE = 77 kg* 9.8 m/s² * 3 m PE = 2263.8 Joules
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) PE= mgh PE = 77 kg* 9.8 m/s² * 3 m PE = 2263.8 Joules KE = 2652.2 Joules
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) PE= mgh PE = 77 kg* 9.8 m/s² * 3 m PE = 2263.8 Joules KE = 2652.2 Joules -388.4 Joules for heat, sound, and other losses.
    • • Please calculate the potential energy of a pole-vaulter at the top of their vault. Their height was 3 meters and they weighed 77 kilograms. PE= mgh (9.8 m/s²) – (Assume all energy in the vault was transformed into potential energy to make this question easier.) PE= mgh PE = 77 kg* 9.8 m/s² * 3 m PE = 2263.8 Joules KE = 2652.2 Joules -388.4 Joules for heat, sound, and other losses.
    • • Activity! Please make a roller coaster on a page in your science journal. – Color Key Areas with high potential energy and kinetic energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Please make a roller coaster on a page in your science journal. – Color Key Areas with high potential energy and kinetic energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Please make a roller coaster on a page in your science journal. – Color Key Areas with high potential energy and kinetic energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Centrifugal Force: (Does not exist) The Force that makes us feel that a force is acting outward on a body moving around a center, arising from the body's inertia Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Centrifugal Force: (Does not exist) The Force that makes us feel that a force is acting outward on a body moving around a center, arising from the body's inertia If I were to throw up right now which way would it go? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Centrifugal Force: (Does not exist) The Force that makes us feel that a force is acting outward on a body moving around a center, arising from the body's inertia Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Centrifugal Force: (Does not exist) The Force that makes us feel that a force is acting outward on a body moving around a center, arising from the body's inertia Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Important Note: Centrifugal force does not actually exist.
    • Important Note: Centrifugal force does not actually exist. We are in a non-inertial coordinate system. Nevertheless, it appears quite real to the object being rotated. Centrifugal force is like Newton's "Every action has an equal an opposite reaction.” When you step on the gas in your car you hit the seat behind you as if you are going backwards but you are really going forwards. As soon as you stop pulling on the merry go round (applying an inward, not outward force) you will fly off in a straight line. No more force inward, no more going in a circle.
    • Important Note: Centrifugal force does not actually exist. We are in a non-inertial coordinate system. Nevertheless, it appears quite real to the object being rotated. Centrifugal force is like Newton's "Every action has an equal an opposite reaction.” When you step on the gas in your car you hit the seat behind you as if you are going backwards but you are really going forwards. As soon as you stop pulling on the merry go round (applying an inward, not outward force) you will fly off in a straight line. No more force inward, no more going in a circle. Learn more at… http://knowledgedrift.wordpress.com/strange-oddities-ofhistory/the-myth-of-centrifugal-force/
    • • Video! “Centrifugal Force” misplayed with some kids who didn’t take this class. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWCBk9Vl-rc Note: All yellow print doesn’t actually exist.
    •  Centripetal Force: Force that acts on a body moving in a circular path and is directed toward the center around which the body is moving. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Teacher Demonstration – I will turn a pail of water upside down over my head. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Why didn’t the water fall out of the pail as I was spinning it around?
    • “I feel centrifugal force.”
    • • Gravity from the mass of the sun keeps the earth from heading out into space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Gravity from the mass of the sun keeps the earth from heading out into space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Gravity from the mass of the sun keeps the earth from heading out into space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The World of the Hammer Throw. Centripetal Force – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tB00eDfTNhs
    • • The World of the Hammer Throw. Centripetal Force – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tB00eDfTNhs As soon as the thrower stopped pulling on the hammer (applying an inward, not outward force) it flew off in a straight line. No more force inward, no more going in a circle. Just a straight line out. Centrifugal force does not exist. Centripetal Force: Learn more at… http://regentsprep.org/regents/physics/phys06/b centrif/default.htm
    • • Activity (Optional) Funky foam tube roller coaster. – Use ½ inch foam pipe insulation cut in half, duct tape to connect the tubes and anchor, cup to catch at end, and marbles.
    • • Create a one page visual of a roller coaster with drawings. – Name your coaster. – Create a not to scale visual that will be achievable with the materials provided by teacher. – Class will vote to choose a model and build the coaster. – Calculate the PE and KE. – Find the mass of the marble. – Measure the height of the coaster. – Calculate the velocity. • Distance / meters divided by seconds and direction
    • • Create a one page visual of a roller coaster with drawings. – Name your coaster. – Create a not to scale visual that will be achievable with the materials provided by teacher. – Class will vote to choose a model and then build the coaster. – Calculate the PE and KE. – Find the mass of the marble. – Measure the height of the coaster. – Calculate the velocity. • Distance / meters divided by seconds and direction
    • • Academic Link! (Optional) PE and KE – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSWl_Zj-CZs
    • • F=MA, PE, KE and more ramp activity. – Available Sheet
    • • Activity! Kinetic and Potential Energy + Newton’s Laws F=MA. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Kinetic and Potential Energy + Newton’s Laws F=MA. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Please create this spreadsheet in your journal. • Truck (D Battery) Car (AA Batter) – Cup (Parked Car) Ramp Height Parked car One Washer Parked Car Parked Car Two Washer Three Washers Lowest AA –Car_________ (Distance of Parked Car) D – Truck________ Middle AA –Car___________ AA –Car_________ (Distance of Parked Car) D – Truck__________ D – Truck________ Highest AA –Car___________ AA –Car_________ (Distance of Parked Car) D – Truck__________ D – Truck________ Make Prediction after data collection, AA –Car_________ D – Truck________ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Set-up of the activity. The height can change by placing the rectangular block on its various sides. Ramp start line Height D 5cm gap Plastic Cup Washers 1-3 AA Meter Stick to measure distance cup “parked car” travels after hit. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Conduct trials with small car (AA Battery) with one and three washers and the three different heights, measuring the distance the parked car traveled after hit in cm. • Repeat with Truck / D Battery. – Do not do medium height as we will predict later. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • F=MA, PE, KE and more ramp activity. – Available Sheet
    • • F=MA, PE, KE and more ramp activity. – Available Sheet
    • • Based on your data, make a prediction for the distance the parked car should travel for both the small car (AA) and truck (D) on your spreadsheets for medium height with two washers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Based on your data, make a prediction for the distance the parked car should travel for both the small car (AA) and truck (D) on your spreadsheets for medium height with two washers. – Run some trials afterward to see if your prediction is correct. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Increase in Friction / Mass to move.
    • Increase in Friction / Mass to move.
    • • F=MA, PE, KE and more ramp activity. – Available Sheet
    • • F=MA, PE, KE and more ramp activity. – Available Sheet
    • • Questions to answer in journal (graded) – Which Battery caused the parked car to move further? Use your data – Mass = Weight of battery – Acceleration - – Explain your answer using F=MA. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How did the height of the ramp affect the movement of the parked car? – Use potential energy and kinetic energy in your response. – Measure the height of the ramp, mass of the batteries, and determine the Potential Energy. PE=mgh Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How did the resistance to force (washers) affect the movement of the parked car? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What should you be aware of as many of you will start driving shortly? F=ma Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • – Which Battery caused the parked car to move further? • The larger D battery because it has more mass and thus has more force.- – Explain your answer above using F=ma. • F was increased because the D battery has more Mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • – Which Battery caused the parked car to move further? • The larger D battery because it has more mass and thus has more force. – Explain your answer above using F=ma. • F was increased because the D battery has more mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • – Which Battery caused the parked car to move further? • The larger D battery because it has more mass and thus has more force. – Explain your answer above using F=ma. • F was increased because the D battery has more Mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • – Which Battery caused the parked car to move further? • The larger D battery because it has more mass and thus has more force. – Explain your answer above using F=ma. • Force increased because the D battery has more mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How did the height of the ramp affect the movement of the parked car? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How did the height of the ramp affect the movement of the parked car? – Increasing the height of the ramp increased the batteries potential energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How did the height of the ramp affect the movement of the parked car? – Increasing the height of the ramp increased the batteries potential energy. This increase of potential energy created an increase in kinetic energy / (Acceleration) which caused the parked car to move further (force). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How did the resistance to force (washers) affect the movement of the parked car? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How did the resistance to force (washers) affect the movement of the parked car? – The more mass added to the parked car (washers) decreased the distance it traveled after being struck. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What should you be aware of as you are only a few years from driving? F=ma Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What should you be aware of as you are only a few years from driving? F=ma – You should be aware that Newton’s Laws of motion are real and they can be deadly so be safe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Remember! Seatbelts save lives. There’s room to live inside of the car if struck hard. – Your odds of survival decrease without a seatbelt. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Career Opportunity: Crash reconstruction. Draws upon principles in physics and mathematics. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Video! Crash Test without a seatbelt (9 sec) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBzyiKmhhY
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity2 – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/sec – Velocity 3 m/sec
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/sec – Velocity 3 m/sec
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) Organize your work! – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² PE= mgh PE = ____ * ___ * ____ – Velocity 3 m/s West PE = Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules Organize your work! PE= mgh PE = ____ * ___ * ____ PE = Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) PE=mgh – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) PE=mgh – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules PE= .148kg * 9.8 m/s² * .06m
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) PE=mgh – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules PE= .148kg * 9.8 m/s² * .06m
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) PE=mgh – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules PE= .148kg * 9.8 m/s² * .06m PE = .087 Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules KE=1/2 m * velocity²
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules KE=1/2 m * velocity²
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules KE=1/2 m * velocity² KE=.5 * .148 * 3 m/s
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules KE=1/2 m * velocity² KE=.5 * .148 * 3 m/s KE=.5 * .148 * 9 m/s
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules KE=1/2 m * velocity² KE=.5 * .148 * 3 m/s KE=.5 * .148 * 9 m/s KE = .666 Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules KE = .666 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules KE=1/2 m * velocity² KE=.5 * .148 * 3 m/s KE=.5 * .148 * 9 m/s KE = .666 Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules KE = .666 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules KE=1/2 m * velocity² KE=.5 * .148 * 3 m/s KE=.5 * .148 * 9 m/s KE = .666 Joules
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules KE = .666 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules KE=1/2 m * velocity² KE=.5 * .148 * 3 m/s KE=.5 * .148 * 9 m/s KE = .666 Joules Mechanical Energy (ME) =
    • • Find the Mechanical Energy of the large D battery hitting the parked car from the highest position. • PE = mgh KE = ½ mass * velocity² • PE = .087 Joules KE = .666 Joules – D Battery mass = 148 g (.148kg) – Height = 6 cm (.06m) – Gravity = 9.8 m/s² – Velocity 3 m/s West – Answer in Joules KE=1/2 m * velocity² KE=.5 * .148 * 3 m/s KE=.5 * .148 * 9 m/s KE = .666 Joules Mechanical Energy (ME) = .753 Joules
    • • Question on homework: Describe three ways potential energy of position as well as potential chemical energy are combined with kinetic energy to generate kinetic electrical energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Question on homework: Describe three ways potential energy of position as well as potential chemical energy are combined with kinetic energy to generate kinetic electrical energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Hydropower : Potential energy turned into kinetic energy of motion turned into kinetic electrical energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Hydropower : Potential energy turned into kinetic energy of motion turned into kinetic electrical energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Hydropower gave rise to early industry. – One of our earliest ways to harness energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Hydropower gave rise to early industry. – One of our earliest ways to harness energy. Potential Energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Hydropower gave rise to early industry. – One of our earliest ways to harness energy. Potential Energy Transfer to Kinetic Energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • In Dinowrig, Wales. Water is pumped from the lower lake to the upper lake when electricity is low in demand.
    • • During times high electrical demand, the stored potential energy flows downhill to generate electricity (Kinetic).
    • • During times high electrical demand, the stored potential energy flows downhill to generate electricity (Kinetic).
    • • During times high electrical demand, the stored potential energy flows downhill to generate electricity (Kinetic).
    • • Kinetic energy to kinetic electrical energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Gravity turns potential energy in tides, into kinetic energy (flowing tides) into kinetic electrical energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Geothermal Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Geothermal -Kinetic energy heat, turns water into steam, water rises and runs a turbine to generate electrical energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Geothermal -Kinetic energy heat, turns water into steam, water rises and runs a turbine to generate electrical energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Geothermal -Kinetic energy heat, turns water into steam, water rises and runs a turbine to generate kinetic electrical energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Steam / Coal and wood burning electric plant
    • • Nuclear energy – Nuclear reactions generate kinetic electrical energy using water, steam, and a turbine.
    • • When you lift an object, chemical energy (a form of potential energy) stored in the chemicals obtained from your digested food is converted into the mechanical energy (kinetic) used to move your arm and the object upward and into heat given off by your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • When you lift an object, chemical energy (a form of potential energy) stored in the chemicals obtained from your digested food is converted into the mechanical energy (kinetic). Which is then used to move your body. Heat is produced Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • When you lift an object, chemical energy (a form of potential energy) stored in the chemicals obtained from your digested food is converted into the mechanical energy (kinetic). Which is then used to move your body. Heat is produced Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • When you lift an object, chemical energy (a form of potential energy) stored in the chemicals obtained from your digested food is converted into the mechanical energy (kinetic). Which is then used to move your body. Heat is produced Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • When you lift an object, chemical energy (a form of potential energy) stored in the chemicals obtained from your digested food is converted into the mechanical energy (kinetic). Which is then used to move your body. Heat is released. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; as it does not have a direction. – Velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, are vectors. A quantity having direction as well as magnitude Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • How you can remember the difference between the two…
    • • How you can remember the difference between the two… Scales are still / Don’t have direction
    • • How you can remember the difference between the two… Scales are still / Don’t have direction Just a cool fighter pilot name, Jet Pilots travel with direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction. Magnitude is just the measurement without direction
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? – Magnitude only • Which are vector quantities? – Magnitude and direction.
    • • Which are scalar quantities? Magnitude is just the – Magnitude only measurement • Which are vector quantities? without – Magnitude and direction. direction
    • • Video Link! (Optional) Scalers and Vectors. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUrMI0DIh40
    •  Speed: A measure of motion, = distance divided by time. D/T Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Speed: A measure of motion, = distance divided by time. D/T Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Speed: A measure of motion, = distance divided by time. D/T Speed is the rate of motion, or the rate of change of position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Speed: A measure of motion, = distance divided by time. D/T Speed is the rate of motion, or the rate of change of position. Can only be zero or positive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Distance = Speed ● Time
    • Distance = Speed ● Time
    • Distance = Speed ● Time
    • Distance = Speed ● Time
    • • How far did Joe walk if he walked a steady 4 km/h for three straight hours?
    • • How far did Joe walk if he walked a steady 4 km/h for three straight hours? Distance = Speed ● Time
    • • How far did Joe walk if he walked a steady 4 km/h for three straight hours? Distance = Speed ● Time Distance = 4 km/h ● 3 h
    • • How far did Joe walk if he walked a steady 4 km/h for three straight hours? Distance = Speed ● Time Distance = 4 km/h ● 3 h Distance =
    • • How far did Joe walk if he walked a steady 4 km/h for three straight hours? Distance = Speed ● Time Distance = 4 km/h ● 3 h Distance = 12 km
    • Distance Speed = --------------Time
    • • What is Joes speed if he walked a steady 5 km in one hour? Rate / Speed R =
    • • What is Joes speed if he walked a steady 5 km in one hour? 5 km Rate / Speed R = or 5 km/hr 1 hour
    • • What is Joes speed if he walked 5 km in one hour? 5 km Rate / Speed R = or 5 km/hr 1 hour
    • • Juan travels 300km in 6hrs. Find his average speed in km/h.
    • • Juan travels 300km in 6hrs. Find his average speed in km/h. • Speed = Distance / Time
    • • Juan travels 300km in 6hrs. Find his average speed in km/h. • Speed = Distance / Time 300km • Speed = ------------ = 50 km/h 6h
    • • Juan travels 300km in 6hrs. Find his average speed in km/h. • Speed = Distance / Time 300km 50km • Speed = ------------ = --------6h h
    • Distance Time = --------------Speed
    • • Marlene drove 500 km at an average speed of 50 km/h? How long did she drive?
    • • Marlene drove 500 km at an average speed of 50 km/h? How long did she drive? • Time = Distance / Speed
    • • Marlene drove 500 km at an average speed of 50 km/h? How long did she drive? • Time = Distance / Speed 500km • Time = ------------ = _____h 50km/h
    • • Marlene drove 500 km at an average speed of 50 km/h? How long did she drive? • Time = Distance / Speed 500km • Time = ------------ = _____h 50km/h
    • • Marlene drove 500 km at an average speed of 50 km/h? How long did she drive? • Time = Distance / Speed 500km • Time = ------------ = 10h 50km/h
    •  Velocity = (distance / time) and direction. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Velocity = (distance / time) and direction. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Velocity = (distance / time) and direction. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Video Link! Speed vs. Velocity Song. TMBG – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRb5PSxJerM Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity = – S is replaced with V because velocity is speed and direction. (Vector) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity = – S is replaced with V because velocity is speed and direction. (Vector) = Change Delta Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity = – S is replaced with V because velocity is speed and direction. (Vector) = Change Delta Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity = – S is replaced with V because velocity is speed and direction. (Vector) = Change Delta Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity = – S is replaced with V because velocity is speed and direction. (Vector) = Change Delta Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What’s Joes velocity if he walked 4 kilometers East in one hour? 4 km East 4 km • V = ----------- = 4 km/hr/east 1 hour Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What’s Joes velocity if he walked 4 kilometers East in one hour? 4 km East • V = ----------- = 4km km km East 4 hr/east hr 1 hour Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. 4m 8m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. 4m 8m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 4m 8m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 4m 4m² = 16 m 8m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 4m 4m² = 16 m 8m 8m² = 64 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 4m 16 m + 64 m = 4m² = 16 m 8m 8m² = 64 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 4m 16 m + 64 m = 80 m 4m² = 16 m 8m 8m² = 64 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 4m 16 m + 64 m = 80 m 4m² = 16 m √ 80m = 8m 8m² = 64 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 4m 16 m + 64 m = 80 m √ 80m = 8.94 m 8.94m 8m 4m² = 16 m 8m² = 64 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. 100m 60m 30m 50m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. 100m 60m 30m 50m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. 100m 60m 50m 30m 80m 178.88m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. 100m 60m 50m 30m 80m 178.88m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. 100m 60m 50m 30m 80m 178.88m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. 100m 60m 50m 30m 80m 178.88m 160m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. 80m 160m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 80m 160m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 80m 80m² = 6400 m 160m 160m² = 25,600m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 80m 6400 m + 25,600 m = 80m² = 6400 m 160m 160m² = 25,600m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 80m 6400 m + 25,600 m = 32,000 m 80m² = 6400 m 160m 160m² = 25,600m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 80m 6400 m + 25,600 m = 32,000 m 80m² = 6400 m √ 32000m = 160m 160m² = 25,600m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Velocity deals with displacement. – Displacement measures where you end up relative to where you started. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 80m 6400 m + 25,600 m = 32,000 m √ 32000m = 178.88m 178.88m 160m 80m² = 6400 m 160m² = 25,600m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. 50m 50m 20m 20m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. 50m 50m 20m 20m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. 50m 50m 20m 20m 40m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. 50m 50m 20m 20m 40m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. 50m 50m 20m 40m 20m 100m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 40m 100m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 40m²= 1600m 40m 100m 100m²= 10000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 1600m + 10000m = 40m²= 1600m 40m 100m 100m²= 10000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 1600m + 10000m = 11600 m 40m²= 1600m 40m 100m 100m²= 10000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 1600m + 10000m = 11600 m √11,600m = 40m²= 1600m 40m 100m 100m²= 10000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 1600m + 10000m = 11600 m √11,600m = 107.7 m 107.7m 40m²= 1600m 40m 100m 100m²= 10000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. 50m 50m 10m 20m 10m 100m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. – Trick question: If you travel a distance and return to the same place your displacement is zero and your velocity is zero. 50m 50m 10m 20m 10m 100m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. 75 25 30 150 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 75 25 30 150 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² Here comes the solution (Pay attention) 75 25 30 150 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 75 200 100 25 30 150 20 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 75 200 100 150 25 30 200m 20 400m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 75 25 30 200m²= 200 100 150 200m 20 400m 400m²= Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 75 25 30 200m²= 40,000m 200 100 150 200m 20 400m 400m²= 160,000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 40,000m + 160,000m = 75 25 30 200m²= 40,000m 200 100 150 200m 20 400m 400m²= 160,000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 40,000m + 160,000m = 200,000 m 75 25 30 200m²= 40,000m 200 100 150 200m 20 400m 400m²= 160,000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 40,000m + 160,000m = 200,000 m √200,000m = 75 25 30 200m²= 40,000m 200 100 150 200m 20 400m 400m²= 160,000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Find the displacement. Now use Pythagorean Theorem A²+B²=C² 40,000m + 160,000m = 200,000 m √200,000m = 447.21 m 75 30 200m²= 40,000m 447.21.7m 200 25 100 150 200m 20 400m 400m²= 160,000m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The speed of the car is 80 km / hr . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The velocity of the car is 80 km / hr / West. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The velocity of the plane is 300 km / hr / West. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The velocity of the plane is 300 km / hr / West. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The velocity of the plane is 300 km / hr / West. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • The speed of the plane is 300 km / hr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • The speed of the plane is 300 km / hr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • The speed of the plane is 300 km / hr Speed and Velocity Calculations and problems. Learn more at…. http://www2.franciscan.edu/academic/mathsci/mathscienceinte gation/MathScienceIntegation-827.htm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Lightning McGreen 2.5 hours to travel 600 kilometers. – How fast was he going in Kilometers an hour? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • It took Lightning McGreen 2.5 hours to travel 600 kilometers. – How fast was he going in Kilometers an hour? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Lightning McGreen 2.5 hours to travel 600 kilometers. – How fast was he going in Kilometers an hour? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Lightning McGreen 2.5 hours to travel 600 kilometers. – How fast was he going in Kilometers an hour? Speed = Distance / Time Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Lightning McGreen 2.5 hours to travel 600 kilometers. – How fast was he going in Kilometers an hour? Speed = Distance / Time Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Lightning McGreen 2.5 hours to travel 600 kilometers. – How fast was he going in Kilometers an hour? Speed = Distance / Time Speed = 600 km / 2.5 h Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Lightning McGreen 2.5 hours to travel 600 kilometers. – How fast was he going in Kilometers an hour? Speed = Distance / Time Speed = 600 km / 2.5 h Speed = 240 km/h Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: 240 km/h – Speed is distance over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • It took Ms. Rally 4 hours to travel 165 kilometers due North. – What was the velocity of her car in Kilometers an hour? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Ms. Rally 4 hours to travel 165 kilometers due North. – What was the velocity of her car in Kilometers an hour? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Ms. Rally 4 hours to travel 165 kilometers due North. – What was the velocity of her car in Kilometers an hour? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Ms. Rally 4 hours to travel 165 kilometers due North. – What was the velocity of her car in Kilometers an hour? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Ms. Rally 4 hours to travel 165 kilometers due North. – What was the velocity of her car in Kilometers an hour? Velocity = Distance / Time Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Ms. Rally 4 hours to travel 165 kilometers due North. – What was the velocity of her car in Kilometers an hour? Velocity = Distance / Time Velocity = 165km / 4 h Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • It took Ms. Rally 4 hours to travel 165 kilometers due North. – What was the velocity of her car in Kilometers an hour? Velocity = Distance / Time Velocity = 165km / 4 h Velocity = 41.25 km/h/North Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: 41.25 km / h / North – Velocity is distance over time and direction. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • What is the speed if the distance was 340 km and the time was 3 hours? – Was Jater speeding? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if the distance was 340 km and the time was 3 hours? – Was Jater speeding? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if the distance was 340 km and the time was 3 hours? – Was Jater speeding? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if the distance was 340 km and the time was 3 hours? – Was Jater speeding? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if the distance was 340 km and the time was 3 hours? – Was Jater speeding? Speed = Distance / Time Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if the distance was 340 km and the time was 3 hours? – Was Jater speeding? Speed = Distance / Time Speed = 340km / 3 h Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if the distance was 340 km and the time was 3 hours? – Was Jater speeding? Speed = Distance / Time Speed = 340km / 3 h Speed = 113km/h Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • 340 km / 3 hours = 113km/h – Jater was speeding. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • How far did Doc Budson travel if he was going 60 kilometers an hour for 4 straight hours? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How far did Doc Budson travel if he was going 60 kilometers an hour for 4 straight hours? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How far did Doc Budson travel if he was going 60 kilometers an hour for 4 straight hours? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How far did Doc Budson travel if he was going 60 kilometers an hour for 4 straight hours? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How far did Doc Budson travel if he was going 60 kilometers an hour for 4 straight hours? Distance = Speed ● Time Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How far did Doc Budson travel if he was going 60 kilometers an hour for 4 straight hours? Distance = Speed ● Time Distance = 60km/h ● 4 h Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How far did Doc Budson travel if he was going 60 kilometers an hour for 4 straight hours? Distance = Speed ● Time Distance = 60km/h ● 4 h Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • In this case, we just multiply the distance traveled by the time. 60 km/h times 4 hours. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • 60 km times 4 hours = 240 km – Check your work, 240/4 should be 60. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • What is the speed if a runner runs a distance of 400 meters in 43 seconds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if a runner runs a distance of 400 meters in 43 seconds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if a runner runs a distance of 400 meters in 43 seconds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if a runner runs a distance of 400 meters in 43 seconds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if a runner runs a distance of 400 meters in 43 seconds. Speed = Distance / Time Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if a runner runs a distance of 400 meters in 43 seconds. Speed = Distance / Time Speed = 400m / 43s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the speed if a runner runs a distance of 400 meters in 43 seconds. Speed = Distance / Time Speed = 400m / 43s Speed = 9.30 m/s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • 400m / 43s = 9.30 m/s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • Video Link! (Optional) Khan Academy – Calculating Speed and Velocity. (Advanced) – Be proactive in your learning and write as he writes. – http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/ mechanics/v/calculating-average-velocity-orspeed
    • • Catching the Violators Available Sheet.
    • • Activity! Looking for the Violators.
    • • Activity! Looking for the Violators.  Safety is a big concern here. Students need to be far from road. Outside behavior must be excellent.
    • • Activity! Looking for the Violators.   Safety is a big concern here. Students need to be far from road. Outside behavior must be excellent. We also must try to conceal ourselves at all time. We do not want anyone to see us / slow down.
    • • Activity! Optional – Teacher measures out 300 feet along road and puts a cone at the start and finish a short distance from the roads edge. – From a distance, students use a stopwatch to time the speed of cars from the start cone to the finish cone. – Speed = Distance (300 ft) divided by time (ft/sec.) – Multiply by .681 (ft/sec to mph conversion) = mph – Over 30 mph is speeding in the village. – Create list of all the speeds and then average. – Does the village have a speeding problem?
    • • Activity! Optional – Teacher measures out 300 feet along road and puts a cone at the start and finish a short distance from the roads edge. – From a hidden distance, students use a stopwatch to time the speed of cars from the start cone to the finish cone. – Speed = Distance (300 ft) divided by time (ft/sec.) – Multiply by .681 (ft/sec to mph conversion) = mph – Over 30 mph is speeding in the village. – Create list of all the speeds and then average. – Does the village have a speeding problem?
    • • Activity! Optional – Teacher measures out 300 feet along road and puts a cone at the start and finish a short distance from the roads edge. – From a hidden distance, students use a stopwatch to time the speed of cars from the start cone to the finish cone. – Speed = Distance (300 ft) divided by time (ft/s.) – Multiply by .681 (ft/sec to mph conversion) = mph – Over 30 mph is speeding in the village. – Create list of all the speeds and then average. – Does the village have a speeding problem?
    • • Activity! Optional – Teacher measures out 300 feet along road and puts a cone at the start and finish a short distance from the roads edge. – From a hidden distance, students use a stopwatch to time the speed of cars from the start cone to the finish cone. – Speed = Distance (300 ft) divided by time (ft/s.) – Multiply by .681 (ft/sec to mph conversion) = mph – Over 30 mph is speeding in the village. – Create list of all the speeds and then average. – Does the village have a speeding problem?
    • • Activity! Optional – Teacher measures out 300 feet along road and puts a cone at the start and finish a short distance from the roads edge. – From a hidden distance, students use a stopwatch to time the speed of cars from the start cone to the finish cone. – Speed = Distance (300 ft) divided by time (ft/s.) – Multiply by .681 (ft/sec to mph conversion) = mph – Over 30 mph is speeding in the village. – Create list of all the speeds and then average. – Does the village have a speeding problem?
    • • Activity! Optional – Teacher measures out 300 feet along road and puts a cone at the start and finish a short distance from the roads edge. – From a hidden distance, students use a stopwatch to time the speed of cars from the start cone to the finish cone. – Speed = Distance (300 ft) divided by time (ft/s.) – Multiply by .681 (ft/sec to mph conversion) = mph – Over 30 mph is speeding in the village. – Create list of all the speeds and then average. – Does the village have a speeding problem?
    • • Activity! Optional – Teacher measures out 300 feet along road and puts a cone at the start and finish a short distance from the roads edge. – From a hidden distance, students use a stopwatch to time the speed of cars from the start cone to the finish cone. – Speed = Distance (300 ft) divided by time (ft/s.) – Multiply by .681 (ft/sec to mph conversion) = mph – Over 30 mph is speeding in the village. – Create list of all the speeds and then average. – Does the town have a speeding problem?
    • • Note: This is nice to know. • Average vs. Instantaneous Velocity – Instantaneous Velocity: When an object starts and then speeds up (not moving at one steady speed).
    • • Note: This is nice to know. • Average vs. Instantaneous Velocity – Instantaneous Velocity: When an object starts and then speeds up (not moving at one steady speed). Instantaneous Velocity Definition: The velocity of an object at any given instant (especially that of an accelerating object); the limit of the change in position per unit time as the unit of time approaches zero; expressed mathematically
    • • Note: This is nice to know. • Average vs. Instantaneous Velocity – Instantaneous Velocity: When an object starts and then speeds up (not moving at one steady speed). Instantaneous Velocity Definition: The velocity of an object at any given instant (especially that of an accelerating object); the limit of the change in position per unit time as the unit of time approaches zero; expressed mathematically
    • • Average: The result obtained by adding several quantities together and then dividing this total by the number of quantities; the mean
    • • Average: The result obtained by adding several quantities together and then dividing this total by the number of quantities; the mean.
    • • Available Extension PowerPoint and Available Sheets. – Metric Conversions and Scientific Notation.
    • • Video Link!, Position, Velocity, and Acceleration. – Please record some of the equations when I pause the video. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6Onfqt-Vzw
    •  Acceleration = The rate of change in velocity. (m/s) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Acceleration = The rate of change in velocity. (m/s) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Acceleration = The rate of change in velocity. (m/s) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Or… a = (v2 − v1)/(t2 − t1)
    • Or… a = (v2 − v1)/(t2 − t1)
    • • Acceleration is measured by taking the change in velocity of an object divided by the time to change that velocity:
    • • Acceleration is measured by taking the change in velocity of an object divided by the time to change that velocity:
    • • Acceleration is measured by taking the change in velocity of an object divided by the time to change that velocity:
    • • Acceleration is measured by taking the change in velocity of an object divided by the time to change that velocity:
    • • Video Link! Speed, Velocity, Acceleration – Be proactive, sketch problems in journal as completed in video. – http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=rZo 8-ihCA9E
    •  Acceleration = The final velocity – the starting velocity, divided by time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Acceleration = The final velocity – the starting velocity, divided by time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Acceleration = The final velocity – the starting velocity, divided by time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Acceleration = The final velocity – the starting velocity, divided by time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Video Link (Optional) 100 meter final London Summer Games (Note Bolt’s acceleration) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2O7K-8G2nwU (Skip ahead to 4:15 for race)
    • • Which car accelerates the fastest in the animation below over the full distance? Who do you think will win the race? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Which car accelerates the fastest in the animation below over the full distance? Who do you think will win the race? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Which car accelerates the fastest in the animation below over the full distance? Who do you think will win the race? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Which car accelerates the fastest in the animation below over the full distance? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Which car accelerates the fastest in the animation below over the full distance? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Which car accelerates the fastest in the animation below over the full distance? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The blue car accelerates the fastest over the full distance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The blue car accelerates the fastest over the full distance. The red car had a good start but slowed down. (deceleration) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The blue car accelerates the fastest over the full distance. The red car had a good start but slowed down. Tie for 2nd and 3rd Place 1st Place Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Can you determine the speed of the green car? – Distance divided by time… (5 seconds?) 100 meters Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer! 20 m/s². 10 meters Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? 200 m/s 80 m/s 4s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? 120 m/s 4s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? • The formula for acceleration is: • a = (Final velocity – starting velocity) / time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? • The formula for acceleration is: • a = (Final velocity – starting velocity) / time. • a = 200m/s -80m/s / 4 s = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? • • • • The formula for acceleration is: a = (Final velocity – starting velocity) / time. a = 200m/s -80m/s / 4 s = a = 120 m/s / 4 s = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? • • • • The formula for acceleration is: a = (Final velocity – starting velocity) / time. a = 200m/s -80m/s / 4 s = a = 120 m/s / 4 s = 30 m/s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Ratman's rat mobile is traveling at 80m/s North when it turns on its rocket boosters accelerating the rat mobile to 200 m/s in 4 seconds. – What’s the rat mobiles acceleration? • • • • The formula for acceleration is: a = (Final velocity – starting velocity) / time. a = 200m/s -80m/s / 4 s = a = 120 m/s / 4 s = 30 m/s North Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A car traveling at 10 m/s starts to decelerate steadily. It comes to a complete stop in 20 seconds. – What is its acceleration / deceleration? a = (v2 − v1) t Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A car traveling at 10 m/s starts to decelerate steadily. It comes to a complete stop in 20 seconds. – What is its acceleration / deceleration? a = (v2 − v1) t 0 m/s 10 m/s 20 s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A car traveling at 10 m/s starts to decelerate steadily. It comes to a complete stop in 20 seconds. – What is its acceleration / deceleration? a = (v2 − v1) t 10 m/s 20 s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A car traveling at 10 m/s starts to decelerate steadily. It comes to a complete stop in 20 seconds. – What is its acceleration / deceleration? a = (v2 − v1) - .5 m/s t 10 m/s 20 s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • A unicyclist was traveling at 2 m/s South and speed up to 6 m/s in 3 seconds. – What was the acceleration? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A unicyclist was traveling at 2 m/s South and speed up to 6 m/s in 3 seconds. – What was the acceleration? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A unicyclist was traveling at 2 m/s South and speed up to 6 m/s in 3 seconds. – What was the acceleration? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (6 m/s) minus the starting velocity (2 m/s) South divided by the time (3 seconds) = acceleration. 6 m/s – 2m/s 3s – 0s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (6 m/s) minus the starting velocity (2 m/s) South divided by the time (3 seconds) = acceleration. 4 m/s 3s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (6 m/s) minus the starting velocity (2 m/s) South divided by the time (3 seconds) = acceleration. 4 m/s = 1.333 m/s South 3s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Acceleration: Learn more at… http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/1dkin/u1l1e.cfm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Video Link! Khan Academy. Acceleration. • (Optional) complete problems as he does. – Be active in your learning not passive. – http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/ mechanics/v/acceleration Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Deceleration: To slow velocity. - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Deceleration: To slow velocity.  Formula is the same as acceleration but will be a negative value. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Deceleration: To slow velocity.  Formula is the same as acceleration but will be a negative value. Note: There is no "deceleration", only negative acceleration Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The formula is the same, but the value will be a negative. – Deceleration = (final velocity – starting velocity) divided by time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • Lightning McGreen was traveling 200 m/s West when he slowed to 50 m/s in 10 seconds. – What was his deceleration? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Lightning McGreen was traveling 200 m/s West when he slowed to 50 m/s in 10 seconds. – What was his deceleration? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (50 m/s) minus the starting velocity (200 m/s) divided by 10 seconds. 50 m/s - 200 m/s 10s – 0s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (50 m/s) minus the starting velocity (200 m/s) divided by 10 seconds. 150 m/s 10s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (50 m/s) minus the starting velocity (200 m/s) divided by 10 seconds. Deceleration = -15 m/s 150 m/s 10s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (50 m/s) minus the starting velocity (200 m/s) divided by 10 seconds. Deceleration = -15 m/s West 150 m/s 10s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (50 m/s) minus the starting velocity (200 m/s) divided by 10 seconds. Deceleration = -15 m/s West 150 m/s 10s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (50 m/s) minus the starting velocity (200 m/s) divided by 10 seconds. Deceleration = -15 m/s West 150 m/s 10s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (50 m/s) minus the starting velocity (200 m/s) divided by 10 seconds. Deceleration = -15 m/s West 150 m/s 10s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The final velocity (50 m/s) minus the starting velocity (200 m/s) divided by 10 seconds. Deceleration = -15 m/s West 150 m/s 10s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Momentum: A measure of the motion of a body equal to the product of its mass and velocity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Momentum: A measure of the motion of a body equal to the product of its mass and velocity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Momentum: A measure of the motion of a body equal to the product of its mass and velocity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Momentum = Mass * Velocity. p =m v Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Momentum = Mass * Velocity. p =m v Momentum Mass kg Velocity m/s Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Momentum = ? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Video Link! Momentum (Optional) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edcpZoM5xmo Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • What is the momentum of Fred if he weighs 3000 kg and is traveling with a velocity of 20 m/s / West? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the momentum of Fred if he weighs 3000 kg and is traveling with a velocity of 20 m/s / West? p =m v Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the momentum of Fred if he weighs 3000 kg and is traveling with a velocity of 20 m/s / West? p =m v Momentum = 3000 kg 20/m/s/ West Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the momentum of Fred if he weighs 3000 kg and is traveling with a velocity of 20 m/s / West? p =m v Momentum = 3000 kg 20/m/s/ West Momentum = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the momentum of Fred if he weighs 3000 kg and is traveling with a velocity of 20 m/s / West? p =m v Momentum = 3000 kg 20/m/s/ West Momentum = 60,000 kg/m/s West Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the momentum of Fred if he weighs 3000 kg and is traveling with a velocity of 20 m/s / West? p =m v Momentum = 3000 kg 20/m/s/ West Momentum = 60,000 kg/m/s West Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is the momentum of Fred if he weighs 3000 kg and is traveling with a velocity of 20 m/s / West? p =m v Momentum = 3000 kg 20/m/s/ West Momentum = 60,000 kg/m/s West Momentum = 6 x 104 kg/m/s West Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Momentum = 60,000 kg/m/s Momentum. Learn more at… http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/mom entum/u4l1a.cfm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • Chick Licks weighs 1000 kg and had a velocity of 20 m/s North. – What was his momentum? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Chick Licks weighs 1000 kg and had a velocity of 20 m/s North. – What was his momentum? p =m v Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Chick Licks weighs 1000 kg and had a velocity of 20 m/s North. – What was his momentum? p =m v Momentum = 1000 kg 20/m/s/ North Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Chick Licks weighs 1000 kg and had a velocity of 20 m/s North. – What was his momentum? p =m v Momentum = 1000 kg 20/m/s/ North Momentum = 20,000 kg/m/s North Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Chick Licks weighs 1000 kg and had a velocity of 20 m/s North. – What was his momentum? p =m v Momentum = 1000 kg 20/m/s/ North Momentum = 20,000 kg/m/s North Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Chick Licks weighs 1000 kg and had a velocity of 20 m/s North. – What was his momentum? p =m v Momentum = 1000 kg 20/m/s/ North Momentum = 20,000 kg/m/s North Momentum = 2 x 104 kg/m/s North Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Momentum for car = 20,000 kg/m/s North
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Momentum for car = 20,000 kg/m/s North – The truck has more momentum so the car gets pushed back. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Momentum for car = 20,000 kg/m/s North – The truck has more momentum so the car gets pushed back. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Momentum Conservation Principle: Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Momentum Conservation Principle: (means constant) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Momentum Conservation Principle: (means constant) – For a collision occurring between two objects (cars) the total momentum of the two objects before the collision is equal to the total momentum of the two objects after the collision. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Momentum Conservation Principle: (means constant) – For a collision occurring between two objects (cars) the total momentum of the two objects before the collision is equal to the total momentum of the two objects after the collision. – Energy cannot be created or destroyed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Oh no! The truck is going to hit the Energizer Bunny. – Who has more momentum? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Video Link! (Optional) Khan Academy – Momentum Problem (Advanced) – http://www.khanacademy.org/video/momentu m--ice-skater-throws-a-ball?playlist=Physics
    • • Activity! Momentum Machine. – Caution! If you spin too fast in chair you could tip and cause bodily injury. – Teacher holds two weights outstretched while sitting in office chair. – Have volunteer spin chair quickly but without tipping. – Once moving, pull the weights into your body. – What happens?
    • • Law Conservation of Momentum: The momentum of an object is the product of its mass and its velocity.
    • • Law Conservation of Momentum: The momentum of an object is the product of its mass and its velocity.
    • • Law Conservation of Momentum: The momentum of an object is the product of its mass and its velocity. – Angular momentum: Rotating objects tend to remain rotating at the same speed / direction unless acted upon.
    • • Law Conservation of Momentum: The momentum of an object is the product of its mass and its velocity. – Angular momentum: Rotating objects tend to remain rotating at the same speed / direction unless acted upon. – When you draw the weights inward, your moment of inertia decreases, and your velocity increases (spin faster).
    • • Law Conservation of Momentum: The momentum of an object is the product of its mass and its velocity. – Angular momentum: Rotating objects tend to remain rotating at the same speed / direction unless acted upon. – When you draw the weights inward, your moment of inertia decreases, and your velocity increases (spin faster). Law Conservation of Momentum: Learn more and complete word problems at… http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/momentum/u4l2b.cfm
    • • Please sketch the following. #1) I.) F.)
    • • Please sketch the following. #2) I.) F.)
    • • Please sketch the following. #3) I.) F.)
    • • Video Link! Conservation of Momentum Track and problems. – Please sketch the Final (F.) after each problem. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdjxMw9bumI
    • • Please sketch the following. #1) I.) F.)
    • • Please sketch the following. #1) I.) F.)
    • • Please sketch the following. #1) I.) F.)
    • • Please sketch the following. #1) I.) F.)
    • • Please sketch the following. #2) I.) F.)
    • • Please sketch the following. #2) I.) F.)
    • • Please sketch the following. #2) I.) F.) m 3m
    • • Please sketch the following. #2) I.) F.) m 3m
    • • Please sketch the following. #3) I.) F.)
    • • Please sketch the following. #3) I.) F.) 3m 3m
    • • Please sketch the following. #3) I.) F.) 3m Sound, 3m Heat, Vibrations
    •  Amount of Work (w) done depends on two things: - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Amount of Work (w) done depends on two things:  The amount of Force (F) exerted. - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Amount of Work (w) done depends on two things:  The amount of Force (F) exerted.  The Distance (d) over which the Force is applied. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Equation for Work: W = F x D  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Equation for Work: W = F x D  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Joule: Unit of energy, work, or amount of heat.  Equal to the energy expended in applying a force of one newton through a distance of one meter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Joule: Unit of energy, work, or amount of heat.  Equal to the energy expended in applying a force of one newton through a distance of one meter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Joule: Unit of energy, work, or amount of heat.  Equal to the energy expended in applying a force of one newton through a distance of one meter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Joule: Unit of energy, work, or amount of heat.  Equal to the energy expended in applying a force of one newton through a distance of one meter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • If you push on an object and it doesn’t move… – Then no work is done. – If an object’s kinetic energy doesn’t change, then no work is done. – If you’re just sitting there, no work is being done. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • If you push on an object and it doesn’t move… – Then no work is done. – If an object’s kinetic energy doesn’t change, then no work is done. – If you’re just sitting there, no work is being done. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • If you push on an object and it doesn’t move… – Then no work is done. – If an objects kinetic energy doesn’t change, then no work is done. – If you’re just sitting there, no work is being done. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • If you push on an object and it doesn’t move… – Then no work is done. – If an objects kinetic energy doesn’t change, then no work is done. – If you’re just sitting there, no work is being done. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Video Link (Optional) Energy, Power, Work. – Be proactive, record notes and problems in journal. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDK2p1QbPKQ
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • For instance, if a model airplane exerts 0.25 newton’s over a distance of 10 meters. – Work = Force times Distance. – How much work was the plane doing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • For instance, if a model airplane exerts 0.25 newton’s over a distance of 10 meters. – Work = Force times Distance. – How much work was the plane doing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • For instance, if a model airplane exerts 0.25 newton’s over a distance of 10 meters. – Work = Force times Distance. – How much work was the plane doing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • For instance, if a model airplane exerts 0.25 newton’s over a distance of 10 meters. – Work = Force times Distance. – How much work was the plane doing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • The plane will expend 2.5 Joules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • A bulldozer exerts 50,000 newtons over a distance of 6 meters. – Work = Force times Distance. – How much work was bulldozer doing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A bulldozer exerts 50,000 newtons over a distance of 6 meters. – Work = Force times Distance. – How much work was bulldozer doing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A bulldozer exerts 50,000 newtons over a distance of 6 meters. – Work = Force times Distance. – How much work was bulldozer doing? “We need some music to help us through this question.” http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=dO_PL3V1c4Y Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A bulldozer exerts 50,000 newtons over a distance of 6 meters. – Work = Force times Distance. – How much work was bulldozer doing? “Can We Do It?” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • W = F times D W = ? Joules F = 50,000 newtons D= Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • W = F times D W = ? Joules F = 50,000 newtons D = 6 meters Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • W = F times D W = ? Joules F = 50,000 newtons D = 6 meters “Yes We Can!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: 300,000 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: 300,000 Joules “We Did it!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration and more available sheet.
    • • 10,000 Joules of work were accomplished by a group of sled dogs exerting 400 newtons. How far did the dogs travel in meters? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • 10,000 Joules of work were accomplished by a group of sled dogs exerting 400 newtons. How far did the dogs travel in meters? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • 10,000 Joules of work were accomplished by a group of sled dogs exerting 400 newtons. How far did the dogs travel in meters? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • A nice elderly couple exerted 500 Joules of work were accomplished by a group of sled dogs exerting 400 newtons. How far did the dogs travel in meters? • W = F times D Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • W = F times D – W = 10,000 Joules – F = 400 newtons – D = Unknown Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • W = F times D – W = 10,000 Joules – F = 400 newtons – D = Unknown – Opposite of multiplying is dividing. So divide by 400 on the other side. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • W = F times D – W = 10,000 Joules – F = 400 newtons – D = Unknown – Opposite of multiplying is dividing. So divide by 400 on the other side. 10,000J = D 25 meters or .025 km 400 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • W = F times D – W = 10,000 Joules – F = 400 newtons – D = Unknown – Opposite of multiplying is dividing. So divide by 400 on the other side. 10,000J = D 25 meters or .025 km 400 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Forces in Motion Pre-Quiz Available Sheet.
    • • Forces in Motion Pre-Quiz Available Sheet.
    • • Activity – Make a class race track and then be prepared to demonstrate a knowledge of the following. Use Note cards next to parts on the track for labels. –Need a balance, tape measure, stop watch. Label the following – Potential Energy – Kinetic Energy – Centripetal Force Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Be prepared for a quiz tomorrow. – It will use the same formulas as today, but with different values.
    • • Be prepared for a quiz tomorrow on the that uses the same formulas as today, but will have different values.
    • • Be prepared for a quiz tomorrow on the that uses the same formulas as today, but will have different values. “If I do strong work today, I will be prepared for tomorrow.”
    • • Please find the following. – Measure the height of the track (start). – Weight of the Hot Wheels car (kilograms). – Distance of the track (meters). – Time from start to finish (seconds). – Direction of track (compass anyone?) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Please calculate the following Mass= , Height= ,Distance= • Potential Energy (PE) PE=mgh • Velocity (d/t) Direction= ,Time= Joules m/s – Can you calculate acceleration? • • • • • Kinetic Energy (KE) = ½ m V² Mechanical Energy (PE + KE) Force (m x a) Momentum (p) = M x V) x Work (F*D) Force x Distance Joules Joules newtons kg/m/s Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Available Sheet: Forces in motion Pre-Quiz. – Very similar to the quiz arriving shortly.
    • • Calculate the following if the height of the ramp was 2 meters facing West, the length of the track was 10 meters, the time from start to finish was 3 seconds, and the weight of the car was .005kg. – – – – – – – Potential Energy (PE) Velocity (d/t) Kinetic Energy (KE) Mechanical Energy (PE + KE) Force (m*a) Momentum (M*V) Work (F*D) .098 Joules 3.33 m / s / West .027 Joules .125 Joules .0165 newtons .0165 kg/m/s .165 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Calculate the following if the height of the ramp was 2 meters facing West, the length of the track was 10 meters, the time from start to finish was 3 seconds, and the weight of the car was .005kg. – – – – – – – Potential Energy (PE) Velocity (d/t) 3.33 Kinetic Energy (KE) Mechanical Energy (PE + KE) Force (m*a) Momentum (M*V) Work (F*D) .098 Joules m / s / West .027 Joules .125 Joules .0165 newtons .0165 kg/m/s .165 Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Calculate the following if the height of the ramp was 2 meters facing West, the length of the track was 10 meters, the time from start to finish was 3 seconds, and the weight of the car was .005kg. – – – – – – – Potential Energy (PE) Velocity (d/t) Kinetic Energy (KE) Mechanical Energy (PE + KE) Force (m*a) Momentum (M*V) Work (F*D) .098 3.33 .027 .125 .0165 .0165 .165 Joules m / s / West Joules Joules newtons kg/m/s Joules Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Quiz Worksheet! Forces in Motion. – Found in activities folder. – Please put your name on it. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • You can now add text to the white space and neatly color the pictures to these parts.
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
    • • Newtonian Mechanics Demonstration. – You teach the class and show us one of your special skills. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Presentation must… – Describe all three laws of motion in detail. – Describe potential and kinetic energy. – Should describe other info covered. • • • • Inertia Force Friction Speed, Velocity – Must be safe but also exciting. – Must be something passionate to you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Presentation must – Describe all three laws of motion in detail. – Describe potential and kinetic energy. – Should describe other info covered. • • • • Inertia Force Friction Speed, Velocity – Must be safe but also exciting. – Must be something passionate to you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Presentation must – Describe all three laws of motion in detail. – Describe potential and kinetic energy. – Should describe other info covered. • • • • Inertia Force Friction Speed, Velocity – Must be safe but also exciting. – Must be something passionate to you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Presentation must – Describe all three laws of motion in detail. – Describe potential and kinetic energy. – Should describe other info covered. • • • • Inertia Force Friction Speed, Velocity – Must be safe but also exciting. – Must be something passionate to you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Presentation must – Describe all three laws of motion in detail. – Describe potential and kinetic energy. – Should describe other info covered. • • • • Inertia Force Friction Speed, Velocity – Must be safe but also exciting. – Must be something passionate to you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Presentation must – Describe all three laws of motion in detail. – Describe potential and kinetic energy. – Should describe other info covered. • • • • Inertia Force Friction Speed, Velocity Helmets and other safety gear required. – Must be safe but also exciting. – Must be something passionate to you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Presentation must – Describe all three laws of motion in detail. – Describe potential and kinetic energy. – Should describe other info covered. • • • • Inertia Force Friction Speed, Velocity – Must be safe but also exciting. – Must be something passionate to you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • 1st Law – An object at rest will remain at rest unless acted upon by a force, an object in motion will remain in motion unless acted upon. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Friction – The resistance to motion. – What is slowing your motion / object. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Inertia: The tendency to want to go in a straight line. What’s keeping the object from going in a straight line.
    • • Inertia: The tendency to want to go in a straight line. What’s keeping the object from going in a straight line.
    • • 2nd Law F= ma • What is the Mass (m)? – What is acceleration (a) – What is the force (F) – How do F, m, and a work in your demo. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • 3rd Law – For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
    • • Potential Energy • Kinetic Energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Can you calculate or mention… – Speed – Velocity – Acceleration – Amount of work – Is there centripetal force? – PE, KE, and ME Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Newtonian Demo: Available sheet for class work / presentation prep and rubric.
    • • Please examine the grading rubric for this project.
    • • Activity! PowerPoint Review Game Part II Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j Please•visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links ournal=tst provided in this unit and complete this worksheet
    • • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to and NSTA) • http://www.sciencedaily.com/ • http://www.sciencemag.org/ • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
    • • Extension Idea! Egg Drop – Create a device that will protect a raw egg dropped from a height. – Learn more at… – http://www.wangmichelle.com/images/experience /related_teaching_experience/science_engineeri ng_explorations/curriculum/science_camp/egg_d rop.pdf
    • • Extension Idea! Egg Drop – Create a device that will protect a raw egg dropped from a height of ____________? – Lets discuss some ground rules • No projects larger than, more expensive than, etc. – Learn more at… – http://www.wangmichelle.com/images/experience /related_teaching_experience/science_engineeri ng_explorations/curriculum/science_camp/egg_d rop.pdf
    • • Activity! Answer with your feet.
    • A B Teacher needs to label the corners of the room. C D
    • A B Please walk safely and take some wrong turns before traveling to the corner with the correct answer. I will count down from 10. C D
    • A B Which of the following is not a form of friction? A.) Energy Friction. B.) Static Friction. C.) Sliding Friction. D.) Fluid Friction. C D
    • A B Which of the following is not a form of friction? A.) Energy Friction B.) Static Friction C.) Sliding Friction D.) Fluid Friction C D
    • A B Friction does all of the following except… A.) Produces heat B.) Wears objects down C.) Slows objects down D.) Speeds objects up. C D
    • A B Friction does all of the following except… A.) Produces heat B.) Wears objects down C.) Slows objects down D.) Speeds objects up. C D
    • A B This means designed or arranged to offer the least resistant to fluid flow.. A.) Momentum Loss B.) Thermodynamics C.) Static Friction D.) Aerodynamics C D
    • A B This means designed or arranged to offer the least resistant to fluid flow.. A.) Momentum Loss B.) Thermodynamics C.) Static Friction D.) Aerodynamics C D
    • A B All energy is… A.) Kinetic or Potential. B.) At a state of rest. C.) Subjected to gravity. D.) Work = Force x Distance C D
    • A B All energy is… A.) Kinetic or Potential. B.) At a state of rest. C.) Subjected to gravity. D.) Work = Force x Distance C D
    • A B The formula for PE is… A.) PE = M X V B.) PE = Distance / Time C.) PE = mgh D.) PE = Work X Distance C D
    • A B The formula for PE is… A.) PE = M X V B.) PE = Distance / Time C.) PE = mgh D.) PE = Work X Distance C D
    • A B Kinetic Energy is the energy an object has because of its… A.) Mass and Motion. B.) Time and Space. C.) Friction Level D.) Affects on gravity. C D
    • A B Kinetic Energy is the energy an object has because of its… A.) Mass and Motion. B.) Time and Space. C.) Friction Level D.) Affects on gravity. C D
    • A B The velocity of the plane is 300 km / hr / West. A.) Speed B.) Distance C.) Friction Level D.) Velocity C D
    • A B The velocity of the plane is 300 km / hr / West. A.) Speed B.) Distance C.) Friction Level D.) Velocity C D
    • A B This is found by taking the final velocity – the starting velocity, divided by time. A.) Work B.) Newton’s 2nd Law C.) Acceleration D.) Friction Coefficient C D
    • A B This is found by taking the final velocity – the starting velocity, divided by time. A.) Work B.) Newton’s 2nd Law C.) Acceleration D.) Friction Coefficient C D
    • A B This is found by taking the final velocity – the starting velocity, divided by time. Don’t be fooled A.) Work by the smart sounding one. B.) Newton’s 2nd Law C.) Acceleration D.) Friction Coefficient C D
    • A B Work = …? A.) F = MA B.) Force x Distance C.) PE = mgh D.) Distance / Time C D
    • A B Work = …? A.) F = MA B.) Force x Distance C.) PE = mgh D.) Distance / Time C D
    • A B Newton’s First Law of Motion is… A.) Called the Law of Reaction. B.) Called the Law of Inertia. C.) Was found to be untrue. D.) Uses Simple Machines. C D
    • A B Newton’s First Law of Motion is… A.) Called the Law of Reaction. B.) Called the Law of Inertia. C.) Was found to be untrue. D.) Uses Simple Machines. C D
    • A B Part of Newton’s First Law describes… A.) F = MA. B.) Objects will always fall. C.) An object at rest stays at rest. D.) For action there is a reaction. C D
    • A B Part of Newton’s First Law describes… A.) F = MA. B.) Objects will always fall. C.) An object at rest stays at rest. D.) For action there is a reaction. C D
    • A B Newton’s 2nd Law describes… A.) F = MA. B.) Objects will always fall. C.) An object in motion stays at rest. D.) For action there is a reaction. C D
    • A B Newton’s 2nd Law describes… A.) F = MA. B.) Objects will always fall. C.) An object in motion stays at rest. D.) For action there is a reaction. C D
    • A B F=MA means… A.) Force = Momentum x Action. B.) Force = Multiply Height x Weight. C.) Force = Mass x Acceleration. D.) Friction = Measure x Action. C D
    • A B F=MA means… A.) Force = Momentum x Action. B.) Force = Multiply Height x Weight. C.) Force = Mass x Acceleration. D.) Friction = Measure x Action. C D
    • A B Which of the following is not a form of friction? A.) Energy Friction. B.) Static Friction. C.) Sliding Friction. D.) Fluid Friction. C D
    • A B Which of the following is not a form of friction? A.) Energy Friction B.) Static Friction C.) Sliding Friction D.) Fluid Friction C D
    • A B Friction does all of the following except… A.) Produces heat B.) Wears objects down C.) Slows objects down D.) Speeds objects up. C D
    • A B Friction does all of the following except… A.) Produces heat B.) Wears objects down C.) Slows objects down D.) Speeds objects up. C D
    • A B This means designed or arranged to offer the least resistant to fluid flow.. A.) Momentum Loss B.) Thermodynamics C.) Static Friction D.) Aerodynamics C D
    • A B This means designed or arranged to offer the least resistant to fluid flow.. A.) Momentum Loss B.) Thermodynamics C.) Static Friction D.) Aerodynamics C D
    • A B All energy is… A.) Kinetic or Potential. B.) At a state of rest. C.) Subjected to gravity. D.) Work = Force x Distance C D
    • A B All energy is… A.) Kinetic or Potential. B.) At a state of rest. C.) Subjected to gravity. D.) Work = Force x Distance C D
    • A B The formula for PE is… A.) PE = M X V B.) PE = Distance / Time C.) PE = mgh D.) PE = Work X Distance C D
    • A B The formula for PE is… A.) PE = M X V B.) PE = Distance / Time C.) PE = mgh D.) PE = Work X Distance C D
    • A B Kinetic Energy is the energy and object has because of its… A.) Mass and Motion. B.) Time and Space. C.) Friction Level D.) Affects on gravity. C D
    • A B Kinetic Energy is the energy and object has because of its… A.) Mass and Motion. B.) Time and Space. C.) Friction Level D.) Affects on gravity. C D
    • A B This is found by taking the final velocity – the starting velocity, divided by time. A.) Work B.) Newton’s 2nd Law C.) Acceleration D.) Friction Coefficient C D
    • A B This is found by taking the final velocity – the starting velocity, divided by time. A.) Work B.) Newton’s 2nd Law C.) Acceleration D.) Friction Coefficient C D
    • A B What is the potential energy of a 2 kilogram weight that was dropped from a height of 10 meters. A.) 196 Joules B.) 15 Newtons C.) 12 Parsecs D.) 3,4188 Variables C D
    • A B What is the potential energy of a 2 kilogram weight that was dropped from a height of 10 meters. A.) 196 Joules B.) 15 Newtons C.) 12 Parsecs D.) 3,4188 Variables C D
    • A B What is the potential energy of a 7 kilogram weight that was dropped from a height of 4 meters. A.) .078 Joules B.) 17 Newtons C.) 274.4 Joules D.) 39,894 Joules C D
    • A B What is the potential energy of a 7 kilogram weight that was dropped from a height of 4 meters. A.) .078 Joules B.) 17 Newtons C.) 274.4 Joules D.) 39,894 Joules C D
    • A B What is the kinetic energy of a 10 kilogram weight that was traveling at 4 meters per second. A.) 52,000 Joules B.) 880 Joules C.) 116 Joules D.) 400 Newtons C D
    • A B What is the kinetic energy of a 10 kilogram weight that was traveling at 4 meters per second. A.) 52,000 Joules B.) 880 Joules C.) 116 Joules D.) 400 Newtons C D
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • More Units Available at… Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River and Water Quality Unit, and The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, Matter, Energy, and the Environment Unit, and The Science Skills Unit. Life Science: The Infectious Diseases Unit, Cellular Biology Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Botany Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and The Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy