Evolution and Natural Selection, Biology Lesson PowerPoint, Charles Darwin

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Change Topics Unit (Evolution and Natural Selection) unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 3200+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 27 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 12 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus within the Change Topics Unit:
Concept "Everything is Changing", The Diversity of Life Photo Tour, Evolution History,Scopes Monkey Trials, Darwin, Evolution, Evidences of Evolution, Four Parts to Darwin's Theory, Natural Selection, The Mechanisms for Natural Selection, Divergent Evolution, Convergent Evolution, What does it mean to be living?, Characteristics of Living Things, Origins of Life (Other Theories), Origins of Life (Science Theory), Needs of Living Things, Origins of the Universe (Timeline), Miller-Urey Experiment, Amino Acids, How Water Aided in the Origin of Life, Human Evolution, Hominid Features, Evidences of Human Evolution, Hominid Skulls Ecological Succession, Primary Succession, Secondary Succession, Plant Succession, Animal Succession, Stages of Ecological Succession, Events that Restart Succession.
This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

The Evolution and Natural / Change Topics Unit explores Evolution, Natural Selection, Characteristics of Life, Life Origins, Human Origins, Earth System History and Ecological Succession.

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Evolution and Natural Selection, Biology Lesson PowerPoint, Charles Darwin

  1. 1. • The four parts to Darwin’s theories. – - – - – - – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn.
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:
  6. 6. • Pay attention in this unit! Evolution is the backbone to biology. – Nothing makes sense in biology without evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7. • Pay attention in this unit! Evolution is the backbone to biology. – Nothing makes sense in biology without evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8. • Evolution Available Sheet that follows slideshow for classwork.
  9. 9. • Evolution Available Sheet that follows slideshow for classwork.
  10. 10. • How old is the earth? – How old is the first life on earth? This unit belongs to Ryan P. Murphy Copyright 2010 found at www.sciencepowerpoint.com
  11. 11. • The earth is roughly 4.6 Billion years old. – Primitive life is believed to have formed 3.85 Billion years ago. – The earth is old, and a lot has changed over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12. • The earth is roughly 4.6 Billion years old. – Primitive life is believed to have formed 3.85 Billion years ago. – The earth is old, and a lot has changed over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13. • The earth is roughly 4.6 Billion years old. – Primitive life is believed to have formed 3.85 Billion years ago. – The Earth is old, and a lot has changed over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. • We have all seen pictures like this, what do you really know about evolution?
  15. 15. • We have all seen pictures like this, what do you really know about evolution?
  16. 16. • We have all seen pictures like this, what do you really know about evolution?
  17. 17. • We have all seen pictures like this, what do you really know about evolution?
  18. 18. • We have all seen pictures like this, what do you really know about evolution?
  19. 19. • We have all seen pictures like this, what do you really know about evolution?
  20. 20. • We have all seen pictures like this, what do you really know about evolution? – Please talk it over with your table group and be prepared to speak about your conversation.
  21. 21.  Evolution: Evolution is change (*) of a population of organisms from one generation to the next.  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22.  Evolution: Evolution is change (*) of a population of organisms from one generation to the next.  * = in the gene pool  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23.  Evolution: Evolution is change (*) of a population of organisms from one generation to the next.  * = in the gene pool  Usually an advancement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24.  Evolution: Evolution is change (*) of a population of organisms from one generation to the next.  * = in the gene pool  Usually an advancement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. • The earliest ideas of evolution as change over time can be seen as lore and myth. – Still very much unexplained.
  26. 26. • The earliest ideas of evolution as change over time can be seen as lore and myth. – Still very much unexplained.
  27. 27. • For most of modern history until the early 1800’s, most biological thinking was essentialism. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • For most of modern history until the early 1800’s, most biological thinking was essentialism. – This is the idea that every species has characteristics that are unalterable or cannot change. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • For most of modern history until the early 1800’s, most biological thinking was essentialism. – This is the idea that every species has characteristics that are unalterable or cannot change. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  30. 30. • For most of modern history until the early 1800’s, most biological thinking was essentialism. – This is the idea that every species has characteristics that are unalterable or cannot change. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31. • Geneticist have the ability to actually alter a species by changing genes.
  32. 32. • Geneticist have the ability to actually alter a species by changing genes.
  33. 33. • Geneticist have the ability to actually alter a species by changing genes. – This is a picture of a beak that was genetically altered to grow teeth.
  34. 34. • A gene is a unit of heredity that is transferred from a parent to offspring.
  35. 35. • A gene is a unit of heredity that is transferred from a parent to offspring. This is when genes change over time in a population of organisms… Evolution
  36. 36. • A gene is a unit of heredity that is transferred from a parent to offspring. This is when genes change over time in a population of organisms… Evolution
  37. 37. • A gene is a unit of heredity that is transferred from a parent to offspring. This is when genes change over time in a population of organisms… Evolution
  38. 38. • During the Enlightenment of the early 1800’s, many of scientist moved from the physical sciences to natural history.
  39. 39. • During the Enlightenment of the early 1800’s, many of scientist moved from the physical sciences to natural history. – Many exciting fossils were found during this period.
  40. 40.  Jean-Baptiste Lamarck Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Just jot my name down somewhere…Ummm.”
  41. 41. • Jean-Baptiste Lamarck proposed the theory of transmutation of species, which turned out to have some flaws. – Nonetheless was the first real theory of evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • Jean-Baptiste Lamarck proposed the theory of transmutation of species, which turned out to have some flaws. – Nonetheless was the first real theory of evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Jean-Baptiste Lamarck proposed the theory of transmutation of species, which turned out to have some flaws. – Nonetheless was the first real theory of evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “How do you think a giraffe got a long neck?”
  44. 44. • Jean-Baptiste Lamarck proposed the theory of transmutation of species, which turned out to have some flaws. – Nonetheless was the first real theory of evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  45. 45. • Jean-Baptiste Lamarck proposed the theory of transmutation of species, which turned out to have some flaws. – Nonetheless was the first real theory of evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • Jean-Baptiste Lamarck proposed the theory of transmutation of species, which turned out to have some flaws. – Nonetheless was the first real theory of evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • Jean-Baptiste Lamarck proposed the theory of transmutation of species, which turned out to have some flaws. – Nonetheless was the first real theory of evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. • Jean-Baptiste Lamarck proposed the theory of transmutation of species, which turned out to have some flaws. – Nonetheless was the first real theory of evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • Audio Link! Radio Lab (Optional) Leaving Your Lamarck. 28 minutes. (HE_ _ ) is said. – http://www.radiolab.org/2012/nov/19/ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Who is this? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • Who is this? ”Ho-Ho-Ho!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • Who is this? Not Santa Clause. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. “I’m Charles Darwin.” “I answered the question…” “What are the laws of life.”
  54. 54. • It wasn’t until Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace published their views of evolutionary theory in 1859 that science finally had an explanation for evolution.
  55. 55. • Picture of Alfred Russel Wallace.
  56. 56. • Picture of Alfred Russel Wallace.
  57. 57. • Picture of Alfred Russel Wallace.
  58. 58. • Picture of Alfred Russel Wallace.
  59. 59. • Picture of Alfred Russel Wallace.
  60. 60. • Alfred Russel Wallace – He is best known for independently proposing a theory of evolution due to natural selection that prompted Charles Darwin to publish his own theory.
  61. 61. • Alfred Russel Wallace – He is best known for independently proposing a theory of evolution due to natural selection that prompted Charles Darwin to publish his own theory. Why Darwin and not Wallace? Learn more at… http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-21549079
  62. 62. • Which one is a younger Charles Darwin, and which one is Alfred Russel Wallace.
  63. 63. • Which one is a younger Charles Darwin, and which one is Alfred Russel Wallace.
  64. 64. • Which one is a younger Charles Darwin, and which one is Alfred Russel Wallace.
  65. 65. • Which one is a younger Charles Darwin, and which one is Alfred Russel Wallace.
  66. 66. • Which one is a younger Charles Darwin, and which one is Alfred Russel Wallace.
  67. 67. • The ideas of Darwin were not widely accepted during his time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • The Butler Bill prevented the teaching of evolution in Tennessee.
  69. 69. • In 1925, The Scopes Monkey Trials occurred. – Science teacher John Scopes was arrested for teaching evolution which was against state law. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • In 1925, The Scopes Monkey Trials occurred. – Science teacher John Scopes was arrested for teaching evolution which was against state law. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. • It was the swinging 20’s. The trial occurred at a time that put… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. • It was the swinging 20’s. The trial occurred at a time that put… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. • It was the swinging 20’s. The trial occurred at a time that put… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • It was the swinging 20’s. The trial occurred at a time that put… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. • Video Link! The Monkey Trials. (Optional) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJLnL8EjIWA – 3:15 minutes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. • John Scopes lost the trail: He was fined 50 dollars and lost his teaching job. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • It wasn’t until the mid 1930’s that evolution gained some acceptance in the field of biology.
  78. 78. • Remembering the Monkey Trials (NPR) – http://www.npr.org/2005/07/05/4723956/timelin e-remembering-the-scopes-monkey-trial Learn more at… http://www.ushistory.org/us/47b.asp
  79. 79. • The First Amendment does not permit the state to require that teaching and learning must be tailored to the principles or prohibitions of any religious sect or dogma... – The state has no legitimate interest in protecting any or all religions from views distasteful to them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. • The First Amendment does not permit the state to require that teaching and learning must be tailored to the principles or prohibitions of any religious sect or dogma... – The state has no legitimate interest in protecting any or all religions from views distasteful to them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81. • The First Amendment does not permit the state to require that teaching and learning must be tailored to the principles or prohibitions of any religious sect or dogma... – The state has no legitimate interest in protecting any or all religions from views distasteful to them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. • Summary – – Creationism cannot be taught in a public school. – Evolution is not a religion. – Evolution to some is a theory, a fact by others. – A theory is an educated guess based on large amounts of data. It explains a great deal about how things may have changed over time, but can be revised and changed as new information is found. – It is the backbone of biology, and backed by mountains of evidence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83. • Summary – – Creationism cannot be taught in a public school. – Evolution is not a religion. – Evolution to some is a theory, a fact by others. – A theory is an educated guess based on large amounts of data. It explains a great deal about how things may have changed over time, but can be revised and changed as new information is found. – It is the backbone of biology, and backed by mountains of evidence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84. • Summary – – Creationism cannot be taught in a public school. – Evolution is not a religion. – Evolution to some is a theory, a fact by others. – A theory is an educated guess based on large amounts of data. It explains a great deal about how things may have changed over time, but can be revised and changed as new information is found. – It is the backbone of biology, and backed by mountains of evidence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • Summary – – Creationism cannot be taught in a public school. – Evolution is not a religion. – Evolution to some is a theory, a fact by others. – A theory is an educated guess based on large amounts of data. It explains a great deal about how things may have changed over time, but can be revised and changed as new information is found. – It is the backbone of biology, and backed by mountains of evidence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • Summary – – Creationism cannot be taught in a public school. – Evolution is not a religion. – Evolution to some is a theory, a fact by others. – A theory is an educated guess based on large amounts of data. It explains a great deal about how things may have changed over time, but can be revised and changed as new information is found. – It is the backbone of biology, and backed by mountains of evidence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  87. 87. • Summary – – Creationism cannot be taught in a public school. – Evolution is not a religion. – Evolution to some is a theory, a fact by others. – A theory is an educated guess based on large amounts of data. It explains a great deal about how things may have changed over time, but can be revised and changed as new information is found. – It is the backbone of biology, and backed by mountains of evidence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88. • Which is Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Scopes?
  89. 89. • Which is Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Scopes?
  90. 90. • Which is Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Scopes?
  91. 91. • Which is Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Scopes?
  92. 92. • Which is Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Scopes?
  93. 93. • Which is Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Scopes?
  94. 94. • Which is Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Scopes?
  95. 95.  Evidence of Evolution  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96.  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97.  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  From simple to more complicated. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. • Principle of superposition. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  99. 99. • Principle of superposition. The rock layers on the bottom are older. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. • Principle of superposition. The rock layers on the bottom are older. More primitive creatures are seen in the older rock layers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  101. 101. • Picture of fossilized cyanobacteria. 3.5 billion years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102. • Many fossils are primitive sea creatures of the Cambrian period. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  103. 103. • This is called a Gypsum Daisy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  104. 104. • You then find your more complicated marine shelled fossils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  105. 105. • Oldest fossilized brain: From a fish 300 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  106. 106. • Earliest fishes: Still millions and millions of years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  107. 107. • Carbon and Radioactive isotope dating is an extremely accurate method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108. • Carbon and Radioactive isotope dating is an extremely accurate method. – Dating to millions / billions of years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109. • Carbon and Radioactive isotope dating is an extremely accurate method. – Dating to millions / billions of years ago. – May be off by 30,000 years. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. • Carbon and Radioactive isotope dating is an extremely accurate method. – Dating to millions / billions of years ago. – May be off by 30,000 years. – But when your talking millions that is very close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111. • Early amphibians. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112. • Early Reptiles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  113. 113. • Early Birds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  114. 114. • Early mammals – Mesozoic, still the time of the dinosaurs. 85 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115. • Earliest Primate fossil: 47 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  116. 116. • Hominid fossil – 3.2 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  117. 117. • I could have shown thousands of more slides of fossil evidence… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  118. 118. • I could have shown thousands of more slides of fossil evidence… – For time sake we must end. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  119. 119. • I could have shown thousands of more slides of fossil evidence… – For time sake we must end. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about the fossil record and evolution at… http://www.agiweb.org/news/ evolution/examplesofevolution .html
  120. 120. • You can now complete this question.
  121. 121. • You can now complete this question.
  122. 122. • You can now complete this question.
  123. 123. • You can now complete this question.
  124. 124. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  125. 125. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  126. 126. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  127. 127. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  128. 128. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  129. 129.  Evidence of Evolution  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  From simple to more complicated.  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Next notes
  130. 130.  Chemical and anatomical similarities of related life forms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  131. 131.  Chemical and anatomical similarities of related life forms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  132. 132.  Chemical and anatomical similarities of related life forms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  133. 133. • Evolution Available Sheet that follows slideshow for classwork.
  134. 134. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? – Each student must pick one, or teacher will assign. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  135. 135. They all have… Some have… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136. They all have… Some have… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Eyes, Nose, Ears, Mouth Warmbloodedness Heart, Lungs, Organs Eat Food, Move Tetrapods (four limbs) Walrus has lost limbs.
  137. 137. They all have… Some have… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Eyes, Nose, Ears, Mouth Warmbloodedness Heart, Lungs, Organs Eat Food, Move Tetrapods (four limbs) Walrus has lost limbs. Teeth, Fur, Hoofs, Smell Glands Eggs Live Birth
  138. 138. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  139. 139. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  140. 140. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  142. 142. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  146. 146. • Modern day animals share similar characteristics. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147. • Modern day animals share similar characteristics. – Here, the arm bones of the earliest amphibian are similar in modern species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148. • Modern day animals share similar characteristics. – Here, the arm bones of the earliest amphibian are similar in modern species. – Size and shape changes over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  149. 149. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  150. 150. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  151. 151. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  152. 152. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  153. 153. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  162. 162. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  163. 163. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  165. 165. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  173. 173. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  174. 174. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  175. 175. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  176. 176. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  177. 177. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179. • The cells of a worm, or a jellyfish, or a grizzly bear are made of organelles that are similar in their composition and how they work. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) or eukaryotic (cells with a nucleus). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) or eukaryotic (cells with a nucleus). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) or eukaryotic (cells with a nucleus). – All cells are similar in their composition. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • Why would a modern whale have vestigial leg bones? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. • Why would a modern whale have vestigial leg bones? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. Millions of Years Ago Present
  188. 188. Millions of Years Ago Present
  189. 189. Millions of Years Ago Present
  190. 190. Millions of Years Ago Present
  191. 191. Millions of Years Ago Present
  192. 192. Millions of Years Ago Present
  193. 193. Millions of Years Ago Present
  194. 194. Millions of Years Ago Present
  195. 195. Millions of Years Ago Present
  196. 196. • Answer: It use to be a species with legs before moving to the water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197. • Video Link! (Optional) Hank explains vestigial structures. – Preview for language. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAfw3akpRe8 – Note location of where the fossil was found. Amphibians don’t inhabit this colder area (Evidence of continental drift). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  198. 198. • Picture of fossil and recreation of an early amphibian. – Note location of where the fossil was found. Amphibians don’t inhabit this colder area (Evidence of continental drift). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  199. 199. • Picture of fossil and recreation of an early amphibian. – Note location of where the fossil was found. Amphibians don’t inhabit this colder area (Evidence of continental drift). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  200. 200. • The Coelacanth.
  201. 201. • The Coelacanth. – Believed to have gone extinct with dinosaurs.
  202. 202. • The Coelacanth. – Believed to have gone extinct with dinosaurs. – Rediscovered (living) in 1938 off the coast of South Africa.
  203. 203. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals.
  204. 204. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  205. 205. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  206. 206. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  207. 207. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  208. 208. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  209. 209. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  210. 210. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  211. 211. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  212. 212. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud. “What we call arms were once legs.” “We are tetrapods.”
  213. 213. • One theory suggests that land animals developed when smaller bodies of water periodically dried up.
  214. 214. • One theory suggests that land animals developed when smaller bodies of water periodically dried up. – Being able to crawl from one pool to the next aided in survival.
  215. 215. • One theory suggests that land animals developed when smaller bodies of water periodically dried up. – Being able to crawl from one pool to the next aided in survival. – This ability was passed on from one generation to the next.
  216. 216. • Another theory
  217. 217. • Another theory – Lunged gulping fish could to avoid predation in the aquatic habitats by climbing into the shallows and then eventually the land. Learn more about lobe finned fish and tetrapod evolution at… http://dinosaurs.about.com/od/otherprehistoriclife/a/tetrapods.htm
  218. 218. • Evolution Available Sheet that follows slideshow for classwork.
  219. 219. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  220. 220. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  221. 221. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  222. 222. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  223. 223. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  224. 224. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  225. 225. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  226. 226. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  227. 227. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  228. 228. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  229. 229. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  230. 230. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  231. 231. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  232. 232. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  233. 233. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  234. 234. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  235. 235. • What type of snake is this? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  236. 236. • What type of snake is this? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  237. 237. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  238. 238. • This is not a snake, it’s a skink. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  239. 239. • This is not a snake, it’s a skink. – An example of intermediate species between lizards and snakes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  240. 240. • Many Pythons (snakes) have spurs (toenails) from when they use to have legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  241. 241. • Many Pythons (snakes) have spurs (toenails) from when they use to have legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  242. 242. • Many Pythons (snakes) have spurs (toenails) from when they use to have legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  243. 243. • This is a human tailbone. This is an example of a vestigial structure. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  244. 244. • This is a human tailbone. This is an example of a vestigial structure. – Picture on right is human embryo. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  245. 245. • Question to answer in your journal to optional video on next slide. – Describe 3 pieces of information about Tetrapod evolution. – Include visuals and evidence found and not found. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  246. 246. • Video Link (Optional)! Tetrapod Evolution • Part I http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k- 5oQlnXSTM&feature=results_main&playnext=1&list=PL05E9C5F10C1EB2B4 • Part II http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3iFADplW6U&feature=related • Part III http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HCTFe_XZFQ&feature=related • Part IV http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKRTrC1B1PI&feature=related • Part V http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khUw_OGRcBs&feature=related
  247. 247. • You can now complete these questions.
  248. 248.  Evidence of Evolution  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  From simple to more complicated.  - Chemical and Anatomical similarities  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Next notes
  249. 249.  The geographic distribution of related species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  250. 250. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin.
  251. 251. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin.
  252. 252. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin.
  253. 253. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin.
  254. 254. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin. Learn more about the Wallace Line at… http://www.radford.edu/~swoodwar/CLASSES/GEOG235/zoogeo g/walline.html
  255. 255. • These different salamander species are closely related and live within a close geographic border of one another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  256. 256. • What is so unique about this salamander?
  257. 257. • What is so unique about this salamander?
  258. 258. • Many species have entered caves where they have changed form. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  259. 259. • Many species have entered caves where they have changed form. – If you live in complete darkness, than you don’t need eyes and rely on other senses such smell, and touch. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  260. 260. • This is a cave angel fish. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  261. 261. • This is a cave angel fish. – It has special hooks so that if can hold on to rocks in cave waterfalls. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  262. 262. • This is a cave angel fish. – It has special hooks so that if can hold on to rocks in cave waterfalls. – It also doesn’t have eyes and has lost the colored pigment in its skin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  263. 263. • Video! Cave Dwellers – Life evolving in one of the most difficult places on Earth. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ke1agwb00U – More: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbZ0T0TlwjE
  264. 264. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  265. 265. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  266. 266. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  267. 267. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  268. 268. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  269. 269. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  270. 270. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  271. 271. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  272. 272. • Does anyone know what this is? – Hint, It has to do with selective breeding. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  273. 273. • This is a device used to collect semen (sperm) from prize animals for selective breeding. – People pay big dollars for prize genes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  274. 274. • Selective Breeding: The intentional breeding of organisms with desirable traits in an attempt to produce offspring with similar desirable characteristics or with improved traits. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  275. 275. • Corn 6,000 to 10,000 years ago looked much different than it does today. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  276. 276. • Corn 6,000 to 10,000 years ago looked much different than it does today. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  277. 277. • Corn 6,000 to 10,000 years ago looked much different than it does today. – By breeding the best corn species of a crop together over thousands of years, the edible part has become much larger. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  278. 278.  Evidence of Evolution  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  From simple to more complicated.  - Chemical and Anatomical similarities  - The geographic distribution of species  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Next notes
  279. 279.  Genetics (DNA) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  280. 280. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  281. 281. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  282. 282. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  283. 283. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  284. 284. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  285. 285. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  286. 286. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time , The gene pool is the set of all genes, or genetic information, in any population.
  287. 287.  Mutation: When a DNA gene is damaged or changed in such a way as to alter the genetic message carried by that gene. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  288. 288. • Note: A mutation can be very harmful to an organism. In some cases however, it may help an individual survive / evolve over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  289. 289. • Note: A mutation can be very harmful to an organism. In some cases however, it may help an individual survive / evolve over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  290. 290. • Note: A mutation can be very harmful to an organism. In some cases however, it may help an individual survive / evolve over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  291. 291. • Everyone trace your hand like so in your journal.
  292. 292. • Everyone trace your hand like so in your journal.
  293. 293. • Video Link! Five Fingers of Evolution – Describes genes / genetics a bit. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NdMnlt2k eE
  294. 294. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  295. 295. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  296. 296. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  297. 297. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  298. 298. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  299. 299. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  300. 300. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  301. 301. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  302. 302. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  303. 303. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  304. 304. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  305. 305. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  306. 306. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  307. 307. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  308. 308. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  309. 309. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). – DNA provides a unique marker. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  310. 310. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). – DNA provides a unique marker. – It shows how similar and how different species are. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  311. 311. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). – DNA provides a unique marker. – It shows how similar and how different species are. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  312. 312. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). – DNA provides a unique marker. – It shows how similar and how different species are. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  313. 313. • How does society use the information learned from studying DNA. – DNA is used to convict criminal in a court of law. – DNA is used to determine genetic diseases and disorders. – DNA is used to determine paternity – Whose the father or mother of a child? – DNA is also used as a tool to see how species are connected, and how they have changed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  314. 314. • How does society use the information learned from studying DNA. – DNA is used to convict criminal in a court of law. – DNA is used to determine genetic diseases and disorders. – DNA is used to determine paternity – Whose the father or mother of a child? – DNA is also used as a tool to see how species are connected, and how they have changed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  315. 315. • DNA provides insight into how similar and how different organisms are. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  316. 316. • DNA provides insight into how similar and how different organisms are. This allows taxonomist to classify organisms more accurately. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  317. 317. • DNA provides insight into how similar and how different organisms are. This allows taxonomist to classify organisms more accurately. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  318. 318. • Humans and Chimpanzee share 94% of the same genes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  319. 319. • Humans and Chimpanzee share 94% of the same genes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  320. 320. • Humans and Chimpanzee share 94% of the same genes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  321. 321. • Humans and Chimpanzee share 94% of the same genes. – We can get a blood transfusion from a chimp. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  322. 322. • You can now complete this questions.
  323. 323. • Modern Importance of evolution. – Evolution is the change in species over long periods of time. – Today, the environment is changing at an alarming rate. – Can organisms evolve to this rapid environmental change? Is it occurring too fast? Will they change or will they be wiped out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  324. 324. • Modern Importance of evolution. – Evolution is the change in species over long periods of time. – Today, the environment is changing at an alarming rate. – Can organisms evolve to this rapid environmental change? Is it occurring too fast? Will they change or will they be wiped out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  325. 325. • Modern Importance of evolution. – Evolution is the change in species over long periods of time. – Today, the environment is changing at an alarming rate. – Can organisms evolve to this rapid environmental change? Is it occurring too fast? Will they change or will they be wiped out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  326. 326. • Modern Importance of evolution. – Evolution is the change in species over long periods of time. – Today, the environment is changing at an alarming rate. – Can organisms evolve to this rapid environmental change? Is it occurring too fast? Will they change or will they be wiped out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  327. 327. • Activity Reading! Charles Darwin – Found in activities folder. – Please read the difficult passage about Charles Darwin and record well written responses to the questions in your journal.
  328. 328. • Video Link! Darwin Biography – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOl0tHVV6Ck
  329. 329. • You can now complete page one of the bundled homework.
  330. 330.  The four parts to Darwin’s theories.  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  331. 331.  Organisms have changed over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  332. 332. • Part I Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  333. 333. • Part I – Organisms have changed over time, and the ones living today are different from those that lived in the past. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  334. 334. • Part I – Organisms have changed over time, and the ones living today are different from those that lived in the past. – Furthermore, many organisms that once lived are now extinct. The world is not constant, but changing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  335. 335. • Part I – Organisms have changed over time, and the ones living today are different from those that lived in the past. – Furthermore, many organisms that once lived are now extinct. The world is not constant, but changing. The fossil record provides ample evidence for this view. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  336. 336. • Student speaker on the next slide. – Each line will be color coded and unfold one at a time. – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  337. 337. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  338. 338. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  339. 339. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  340. 340. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  341. 341. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  342. 342. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  343. 343.  Organisms share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  344. 344.  Organisms share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  345. 345.  Organisms share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  346. 346. What happened here?
  347. 347. That species went extinct
  348. 348. • Darwin’s Journal Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  349. 349. • This would be an incorrect according to evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  350. 350. • This would be an incorrect according to evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  351. 351. • Which picture below is the more accurate description of evolution? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  352. 352. • Answer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  353. 353. • We make the assumption that there is just one tree of life, or just one genesis.
  354. 354. • We make the assumption that there is just one tree of life, or just one genesis. – Some scientists have theorized life may have begun more than once.
  355. 355. • We make the assumption that there is just one tree of life, or just one genesis. – Some scientists have theorized life may have begun more than once.
  356. 356. • Don’t look at humans as just coming from apes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  357. 357. • Don’t look at humans as just coming from apes. – We are one stem on a giant tree of primates that share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  358. 358. • Don’t look at humans as just coming from apes. – We are one stem on a giant tree of primates that share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  359. 359. • You can now complete these questions.
  360. 360. • Change is gradual and slow, taking place over a long time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  361. 361. • Change is gradual and slow, taking place over a long time. – This was supported by the fossil record, and was consistent with the fact that no naturalist had observed the sudden appearance of a new species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  362. 362.  Change is a slow process over many generations.  Punctuated evolution shows us that change can during some periods speed up.  Large extinction events are common. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  363. 363.  Change is a slow process over many generations.  Punctuated evolution shows us that change can during some periods speed up.  Large extinction events are common. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  364. 364.  Change is a slow process over many generations.  Punctuated evolution shows us that change can during some periods speed up.  Large extinction events are common. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  365. 365. • Video - Evolution of Everything, 13.7 billion years ago to modern humans in 7 min. Enjoy! • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbJ_nIFmFsc Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  366. 366. • Video! The Evolution of... – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faRlFsYmkeY Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  367. 367. • The mechanism of evolutionary change was natural selection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  368. 368. • The mechanism of evolutionary change was natural selection. – This was the most important and revolutionary part of Darwin's theory, and it deserves to be considered in greater detail. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  369. 369.  The mechanism of evolutionary change was natural selection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  370. 370.  The mechanism of evolutionary change was natural selection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  371. 371.  Natural Selection: Organisms best suited to their environment reproduce more often than others and pass the adaptation to their offspring (kids). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  372. 372.  Natural Selection: Organisms best suited to their environment reproduce more often than others and pass the adaptation to their offspring (kids). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  373. 373.  The mechanism for evolution is natural selection.  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  374. 374. • A healthy bullfrog can lay 20,000 eggs every year. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  375. 375. • A healthy bullfrog can lay 20,000 eggs every year. If all of those eggs survived to frogs and reproduced, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  376. 376. • A healthy bullfrog can lay 20,000 eggs every year. If all of those eggs survived to frogs and reproduced, How many frogs would be on the planet after ten years? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  377. 377. • Answer: 20,000 to the tenth power. 2010 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  378. 378. • Answer: 20,000 to the tenth power. 2010 • 10,240,000,000,000 which is also.. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  379. 379. • Answer: 20,000 to the tenth power. 2010 • 10,240,000,000,000 which is also.. • 10 trillion, 240 billion. • 34 times the stars in our galaxy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  380. 380. • Answer: 20,000 to the tenth power. 2010 • 10,240,000,000,000 which is also.. • 10 trillion, 240 billion. • 34 times the stars in our galaxy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  381. 381. • Answer: Enough to cover the entire Earth in frogs and out into space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  382. 382. • How cool would it be to be a frog?
  383. 383. • How cool would it be to be a frog? – You can jump wicked high.
  384. 384. • How cool would it be to be a frog? – You can jump wicked high. – You can stick out your tongue really far.
  385. 385. • How cool would it be to be a frog? – You can jump wicked high. – You can stick out your tongue really far. – You can see underwater…
  386. 386. • How cool would it be to be a frog? – You can jump wicked high. – You can stick out your tongue really far. – You can see underwater… – You can relax on lilly pads.
  387. 387. • So what is going to happen to most of these frog eggs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  388. 388. • Many of the eggs will never become tadpoles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  389. 389. • Many of the eggs will never become tadpoles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  390. 390. • So what is going to happen to most of these tadpoles? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  391. 391. “Ahhhhhhhhh, Dragonfly larvae!”