Electron Orbitals Physical Science Lesson PowerPoint

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Atoms and Periodic Table of the Elements unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 2000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 12 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 15 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus: -Atoms (Atomic Force Microscopes), Rutherford's Gold Foil Experiment, Cathode Tube, Atoms, Fundamental Particles, The Nucleus, Isotopes, AMU, Size of Atoms and Particles, Quarks, Recipe of the Universe, Atomic Theory, Atomic Symbols, #'s, Valence Electrons, Octet Rule, SPONCH Atoms, Molecules, Hydrocarbons (Structure), Alcohols (Structure), Proteins (Structure), Periodic Table of the Elements, Organization of Periodic Table, Transition Metals, Electron Negativity, Non-Metals, Metals, Metalloids, Atomic Bonds, Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Metallic Bonds, Ionization, and much more.

This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

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Electron Orbitals Physical Science Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indents when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics - -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Label please. Neutron Proton Electron
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  6. 6.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of _________. -Atoms cannot be made or __________. -All atoms of the same element are _________. -Different elements have different types of _____. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  7. 7.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of _________. -Atoms cannot be made or __________. -All atoms of the same element are _________. -Different elements have different types of _____. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  8. 8.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or __________. -All atoms of the same element are _________. -Different elements have different types of _____. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  9. 9.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or __________. -All atoms of the same element are _________. -Different elements have different types of _____. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  10. 10.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. -All atoms of the same element are _________. -Different elements have different types of _____. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  11. 11.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. -All atoms of the same element are _________. -Different elements have different types of _____. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  12. 12.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. -All atoms of the same element are identical. -Different elements have different types of _____. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  13. 13.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. -All atoms of the same element are identical. -Different elements have different types of _____. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  14. 14.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. -All atoms of the same element are identical. -Different elements have different types of atoms. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  15. 15.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. -All atoms of the same element are identical. -Different elements have different types of atoms. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are ____________. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  16. 16.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. -All atoms of the same element are identical. -Different elements have different types of atoms. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are rearranged. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  17. 17.  John Dalton’s Atomic Theories -All matter is composed of atoms. -Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. -All atoms of the same element are identical. -Different elements have different types of atoms. -Chemical reactions occur when atoms are rearranged. -Compounds are formed from atoms of the elements.
  18. 18. “Please close your journal.”
  19. 19. • Which is not one of John Daltons Atomic Theories? A.) All matter is composed of atoms. B.) Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. C.) All atoms of the same element are identical. D.) Different elements have the same type of atoms. E.) Chemical reactions occur when atoms are rearranged. F.) Compounds are formed from atoms of the constituent elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20. • Which is not one of John Daltons Atomic Theories? A.) All matter is composed of atoms. B.) Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. C.) All atoms of the same element are identical. D.) Different elements have the same type of atoms. E.) Chemical reactions occur when atoms are rearranged. F.) Compounds are formed from atoms of the constituent elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Which is not one of John Daltons Atomic Theories? A.) All matter is composed of atoms. B.) Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. C.) All atoms of the same element are identical. D.) Different elements have different types of atoms. E.) Chemical reactions occur when atoms are rearranged. F.) Compounds are formed from atoms of the constituent elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. “One more time.”
  23. 23. • Which is not one of John Daltons Atomic Theories? A.) All matter is composed of atoms. B.) Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. C.) All atoms of the same element are different. D.) Different elements have different types of atoms. E.) Chemical reactions occur when atoms are rearranged. F.) Compounds are formed from atoms of the constituent elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24. • Which is not one of John Daltons Atomic Theories? A.) All matter is composed of atoms. B.) Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. C.) All atoms of the same element are different. D.) Different elements have different types of atoms. E.) Chemical reactions occur when atoms are rearranged. F.) Compounds are formed from atoms of the constituent elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. • Which is not one of John Daltons Atomic Theories? A.) All matter is composed of atoms. B.) Atoms cannot be made or destroyed. C.) All atoms of the same element are identical. D.) Different elements have different types of atoms. E.) Chemical reactions occur when atoms are rearranged. F.) Compounds are formed from atoms of the constituent elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26. “I was one of the first people to document color blindness.” Learn more: http://www.biography.com/ people/john-dalton-9265201
  27. 27. • The Greek root for the word atom, "atomon," means "that which cannot be divided." Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • The Greek root for the word atom, "atomon," means "that which cannot be divided." –But atoms can be divided! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • The Greek root for the word atom, "atomon," means "that which cannot be divided." –But atoms can be divided! –But not easily on Earth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  30. 30. • The Greek root for the word atom, "atomon," means "that which cannot be divided." –But atoms can be divided! –But not easily on Earth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31.  Each Element is made up of one kind of atom. The number of Protons and Electrons. Atoms are arranged on The Periodic Table of Elements.
  32. 32.  Each Element is made up of one kind of atom. The number of Protons and Electrons. Atoms are arranged on The Periodic Table of Elements.
  33. 33. • Hydrogen – 1 proton – Has an atomic mass of 1. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  34. 34. • Hydrogen – 1 proton – Has an atomic mass of 1. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35. • Hydrogen – 1 proton – Has an atomic mass of 1. • Helium – 2 protons and 2 neutrons – Has an atomic mass of 4. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. • Hydrogen – 1 proton – Has an atomic mass of 1. • Helium – 2 protons and 2 neutrons – Has an atomic mass of 4. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37.  Atomic Mass = AMU Atomic Mass Units, The number of protons, neutrons, and electrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • Review! To find # of protons and electrons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Review! To find # of protons and electrons – It is the atomic number, or count the P+ or E-. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • Review! To find # of protons and electrons – It is the atomic number, or count the P+ or E-. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • Review! To find # of protons and electrons – It is the atomic number. – What is this atoms Atomic number? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • Answer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Answer! Count the 11 Protons or 11 Electrons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  44. 44. • Answer! Atomic Number 11. – What element is #11 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  45. 45. • Answer! Atomic Number 11. – What element is #11 Sodium Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • Review! To find # of neutrons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • Review! To find # of neutrons – Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass to determine the difference. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. • Review! To find # of neutrons – Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass to determine the difference. – How many neutrons does Lithium have? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • Review! To find # of neutrons – Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass to determine the difference. – How many neutrons does Lithium have? Atomic Mass Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Review! To find # of neutrons – Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass to determine the difference. – How many neutrons does Lithium have? Atomic Mass Atomic Number Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • Review! To find # of neutrons – Subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass to determine the difference. – How many neutrons does Lithium have? Atomic Mass Atomic Number 6.94 amu – 3 = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • Answer! 6.94 – 3 = 3.94 Atomic Mass Atomic Number 6.94 amu – 3 = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. • Answer! 6.94 – 3 = 3.94 or 4 neutrons Atomic Mass Atomic Number 6.94 amu – 3 = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • Mini-Periodic Table Available Sheet
  55. 55. • Mini-Periodic Table Available Sheet
  56. 56. • Activity! Please create the table on the next slide, 4 down x 10 across. – Use the Periodic Table of Elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. H He Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. H He Li Na K Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. H He Li Ne Na Ar K Kr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Ar K Kr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Kr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy H
  64. 64.  New Area of Focus: Electron Orbitals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Niels Bohr (1915): Student to Ernest Rutherford. – The Bohr model is a simplified picture of an atom. We will spend a lot of time learning this, and then…. – The correct theory of the atom… • (Quantum Mechanics) • More Difficult
  66. 66. • Niels Bohr (1915): Student to Ernest Rutherford. – The Bohr model is a simplified picture of an atom. We will spend a lot of time learning this, and then…. – The correct theory of the atom… • (Quantum Mechanics) • More Difficult Learn more http://chemed.chem.pu rdue.edu/genchem/hist ory/bohr.html “Hey, I suggested the idea that electrons move from one energy level to another in large steps.”.-Quantum…. Learn more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wi ki/Niels_Bohr
  67. 67. • Video Link! Electron Orbitals – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNM21emk MJo
  68. 68.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy How many valence electrons?
  70. 70.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1
  72. 72.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1
  73. 73.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2
  74. 74.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2
  75. 75.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2 1
  76. 76.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2 1
  77. 77.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2 1 4
  78. 78.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2 1 4
  79. 79.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2 1 4 5
  80. 80.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2 1 4 5
  81. 81.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2 1 4 5 1
  82. 82.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2 1 4 5 1 Total Electrons
  83. 83.  Valence electrons: Electrons in the outer most shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 1 2 1 4 5 1 Total Electrons
  84. 84. • Activity! Quiz Wiz: Name the atom based on the electron orbitals / atomic number. – Also tell me how many valence the atom has? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • Answers! Quiz Wiz: The answer will be given after each questions instead of at the end. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • Answers! Quiz Wiz: The answer will be given after each questions instead of at the end. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “This Quiz Wiz will require you to work in table groups.”
  87. 87. 2+8+18+32=60
  88. 88. 2+8+18+32=60
  89. 89. 2+8+18+32=60
  90. 90. 2+8+18+32=60
  91. 91. 2+8+18+32=60
  92. 92. 2+8+18+32=60
  93. 93. • Bonus: What is this, and what characters have worn it. Do you know the order. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94. • Bonus: Lost by the Dark Lord Sauron, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. • Bonus: Lost by the Dark Lord Sauron, Found by Smeagol / Gollum – Lost in cave, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96. • Bonus: Lost by the Dark Lord Sauron, Found by Smeagol / Gollum – Lost in cave, Found by Bilbo Baggins, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. • Bonus: Lost by the Dark Lord Sauron, Found by Smeagol / Gollum – Lost in cave, Found by Bilbo Baggins, and given to Frodo Baggins. LOTR Trilogy & Hobbit. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. This is really difficult learning ahead and I’m going to try my best to learn it. I’m not going to give up.
  99. 99. This is really difficult learning ahead and I’m going to try my best to learn it. I’m not going to give up.
  100. 100. This is really difficult learning ahead and I’m going to try my best to learn it. I’m not going to give up. This is really difficult and I’m going to quit as soon as I don’t know it. I’m going to check out completely or create issues for those choosing A.
  101. 101. This is really difficult learning ahead and I’m going to try my best to learn it. I’m not going to give up. This is really difficult and I’m going to quit as soon as I don’t know it. I’m going to check out completely or create issues for those choosing A.
  102. 102. This is really difficult learning ahead and I’m going to try my best to learn it. I’m not going to give up. This is really difficult and I’m going to quit as soon as I don’t know it. I’m going to check out completely or create issues for those choosing A.
  103. 103. This is really difficult learning ahead and I’m going to try my best to learn it. I’m not going to give up. This is really difficult and I’m going to quit as soon as I don’t know it. I’m going to check out completely or create issues for those choosing A.
  104. 104. This is really difficult learning ahead and I’m going to try my best to learn it. I’m not going to give up. This is really difficult and I’m going to quit as soon as I don’t know it. I’m going to check out completely or create issues for those choosing A.
  105. 105. • Electron Orbitals Available Sheet
  106. 106.  The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  107. 107.  The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108.  The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109.  The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110.  The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111.  The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112.  The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  113. 113.  The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  114. 114.  The number of valence electrons determines the group placement of an element on the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115. • Electron Orbitals Available Sheet
  116. 116.  The 1, 2, 3, 4 electron shell can hold… 2, 8, 18, 32 electrons
  117. 117.  The 1, 2, 3, 4 electron shell can hold…
  118. 118.  The 1, 2, 3, 4 electron shell can hold… 2, 8, 8, 2 electrons
  119. 119.  The 1, 2, 3, 4 electron shell can hold… 2, 8, 8, 2 electrons For the first 20 elements the pattern is 2, 8, 8, 2
  120. 120.  The 1, 2, 3, 4 electron shell can hold… 2, 8, 8, 2 electrons For the first 20 elements the pattern is 2, 8, 8, 2
  121. 121. Electrons fill low energy orbitals (closer to the nucleus) before they fill higher energy ones.
  122. 122. Electrons fill low energy orbitals (closer to the nucleus) before they fill higher energy ones.
  123. 123. Electrons fill low energy orbitals (closer to the nucleus) before they fill higher energy ones.
  124. 124. “If you have sidewalk chalk bring it for the next activity.”
  125. 125. • Activity! Going outside and creating the atom Nitrogen #7 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  126. 126. • Activity! Going outside and creating the atom Nitrogen #7 – Students need to be protons, neutrons, and electrons in the correct orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  127. 127. • Activity! Going outside and creating the atom Nitrogen #7 – Students need to be protons, neutrons, and electrons in the correct orbitals. • Boys neutrons, girls protons in nucleus? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  128. 128. • Activity! Going outside and creating the atom Nitrogen #7 – Students need to be protons, neutrons, and electrons in the correct orbitals. • Boys neutrons, girls protons in nucleus? – Bring your Periodic Table because teacher will require you to build a few more atoms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Okay Nucleons.” “Do you have your periodic table and sidewalk chalk to some elements of my choosing after we build nitrogen?”
  129. 129.  Most of the transition metals…  2, 8, 18, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2 8 18
  130. 130.  Most of the transition metals…  2, 8, 18, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2 8 18 The transition metals are able to put up to 32 electrons in their second-to-last shell
  131. 131.  Most of the transition metals…  2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 18, 2 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2 8 18 32 32 18 The transition metals are able to put up to 32 electrons in their second-to-last shell
  132. 132. 2
  133. 133. • After the second orbit or shell is filled, things start to get complicated. The third shell fills until it gets to 8, and then the fourth shell starts adding electrons until it too has 8 electrons. Then the third shell fills until it gets to 18. 2 8
  134. 134. • After the second orbit or shell is filled, things start to get complicated. The third shell fills until it gets to 8, and then the fourth shell starts adding electrons until it too has 8 electrons. Then the third shell fills until it gets to 18. 2 8 8
  135. 135. • After the second orbit or shell is filled, things start to get complicated. The third shell fills until it gets to 8, and then the fourth shell starts adding electrons until it too has 8 electrons. Then the third shell fills until it gets to 18. 2 8 8 8
  136. 136. • After the second orbit or shell is filled, things start to get complicated. The third shell fills until it gets to 8, and then the fourth shell starts adding electrons until it too has 8 electrons. Then the third shell fills until it gets to 18. 2 8 18 8
  137. 137. • Electron Orbitals Available Sheet
  138. 138. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  139. 139. • 2 electrons fill the first level Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  140. 140. • 2 electrons fill the first level Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141. • 2 electrons fill the first level • 8 electrons fill the second level, ring, or shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  142. 142. • 2 electrons fill the first level • 8 electrons fill the second level, ring, or shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143. • 2 electrons fill the first level • 8 electrons fill the second level, ring, or shell, and then… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. • 2 electrons fill the first level • 8 electrons fill the second level, ring, or shell, and then… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145. • Electron Orbitals Available Sheet
  146. 146. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels?
  149. 149. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels?
  150. 150. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels?
  151. 151. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels?
  152. 152. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels?
  153. 153. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159. • How many electrons are in the first three energy levels? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Fluorine atom below #9 9 Protons Electrons
  161. 161. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Fluorine atom below #9 9 Protons Electrons
  162. 162. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Fluorine atom below #9 9 Protons Electrons
  163. 163. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Fluorine atom below #9 Answer! 9 Protons Electrons
  164. 164. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Fluorine atom below #9 Answer! 9 Protons Electrons 2
  165. 165. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Fluorine atom below #9 Answer! 9 Protons Electrons 2 7
  166. 166. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Fluorine atom below #9 Answer! 9 Protons Electrons 2 7 “I want one more.”
  167. 167. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Sulfur atom below #16 16 Protons Electrons
  168. 168. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Sulfur atom below #16 16 Protons Electrons
  169. 169. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Sulfur atom below #16 16 Protons Electrons
  170. 170. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Sulfur atom below #16 16 Protons Electrons
  171. 171. 16 Protons Electrons 2
  172. 172. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8
  173. 173. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8 6
  174. 174. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8 6 “We want two more.”
  175. 175. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8 6
  176. 176. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8 6
  177. 177. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8 6
  178. 178. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8 6
  179. 179. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8 6
  180. 180. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8 6
  181. 181. 16 Protons Electrons 2 8 8
  182. 182. Not Smart Board Activity! Arrange the electrons onto the Potassium atom below #19 19 Protons Electrons
  183. 183. 19 Protons Electrons
  184. 184. 19 Protons Electrons
  185. 185. 19 Protons Electrons Answer! 2
  186. 186. 19 Protons Electrons Answer! 2 8
  187. 187. 19 Protons Electrons Answer! 2 8 8
  188. 188. 19 Protons Electrons Answer! 2 8 8 1
  189. 189. 19 Protons Electrons Answer! One Valence Electron 2 8 8 1
  190. 190. • What element is this? – Why?
  191. 191. • What element is this? – Why? – Trick, not a real atom.
  192. 192. • What element is this? – Why? – Trick, not a real atom. Based on valence electrons it would be nitrogen with 5.
  193. 193. • What element is this? – Why? – Trick, not a real atom. Based on valence electrons it would be nitrogen with 5. Based on total electrons it should be neon with 10.
  194. 194. • What element is this? – Why? – Trick, not a real atom. Based on valence electrons it would be nitrogen with 5. Based on total electrons it should be neon with 10. My best guess is that it’s suppose to be neon but the creator in cyberland does not know about electron orbitals.
  195. 195. • Activity! Online Atom Builder. • http://www.freezeray.com/flashFiles/atomB uilder.htm • http://www.sharewareconnection.com/the- atom-builder.htm – Sodium Na – Calcium Ca – Potassium K – Beryllium Be – Aluminum Al Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. • You should doing page 5 and 6 in your bundle.
  197. 197. • Additional Available Sheet. Orbitals, – Find P+, N, and E-, Atomic #, Mass and more.
  198. 198. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  199. 199. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Areas of Focus within The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit: Atoms (Atomic Force Microscopes), Rutherford’s Gold Foil Experiment, Cathode Tube, Atoms, Fundamental Particles, The Nucleus, Isotopes, AMU, Size of Atoms and Particles, Quarks, Recipe of the Universe, Atomic Theory, Atomic Symbols, #’;s, Valence Electrons, Octet Rule, SPONCH Atoms, Molecules, Hydrocarbons (Structure), Alcohols (Structure), Proteins (Structure), Atomic Bonds, Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Metallic Bonds, , Precipitation Reactions, Acids and Bases, Electron Negativity, Polar Bonds, Chemical Change, Exothermic Reactions, Endothermic Reactions, Laws Conservation of Matter, Balancing Chemical Equations, Oxidation and Reduction, Periodic Table of the Elements, Organization of Periodic Table, Transition Metals, Acids and Bases, Non-Metals, Metals, Metalloids, Ionization.
  200. 200. • This PowerPoint roadmap is one small part of my Atoms and Periodic Table Unit. • This unit includes a four part 2000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap. • 13 page bundled homework that chronologically follows slideshow • 14 pages of unit notes with visuals. • 3 PowerPoint review games. • Activity sheets, rubrics, advice page, curriculum guide, materials list, and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  201. 201. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  202. 202. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  203. 203. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com
  204. 204. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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