• Which makes more sense to plant in a dry
climate? Native deep rooted grasses or
non-native grasses?
Copyright © 2010 Rya...
 New Abiotic Factor: Water.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Water availability varies greatly on this
planet.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Water availability varies greatly on this
planet.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Water is essential for life, and all organisms
depend on it.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Homework Question: Describe some of the
adaptations displayed by plants and animals
to survive with low water availabili...
• Water requirements and plants.
– -
– -
– -
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Hydrophytes: Plants which grow in water.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Mesophytes: Plants with average water
needs.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Xerophytes: Plants which grow in dry
environments.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Adaptations of plants to survive with
minimal water include.
– -
– -
– -
• Using stomata: Structures that can close to
keep water in when dry.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Using stomata: Structures that can close to
keep water in when dry.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Thick waxy cuticles to keep water in
(succulents, cacti)
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Small leaves, or absence of leaves.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Water storage tissues.
• Which makes more sense to plant in a dry
climate? Native deep rooted grasses or
non-native grasses?
Copyright © 2010 Rya...
• Answer! Deep rooted native grasses do
not require constant watering to survive
and should be planted in areas with water...
• Deep roots
• Deep roots
• There is a growing movement to plant native
species as a front lawn instead of grass. Lots
of advantages to the ecosyste...
• There is a growing movement to plant native
species as a front lawn instead of grass. Lots
of advantages to the ecosyste...
• You can’t play backyard sports .
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• You can’t play backyard sports .
“Mom” “Billy lost
the ball in the
native
vegetation.”
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• How animals have adapted to low water
availability?
– -
– -
– -
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Body covering can limit water loss.
– Insect chitin can keep in water.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Body tissue that retain water.
• Some small animals can absorb water from
the air in morning (dew), then go
underground.
– Rare desert frogs and some ins...
• Eat prey items that are full of water.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Have really dry feces.
• Come out only at night. Nocturnal.
• Seek shade, and live underground.
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Let’s give it a shot.
– Pretend you see a few things that may not be
there.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Video Links (Optional)
• (Man vs. Wild (Sahara)
– Preview before viewing with students.
– Covers, dehydration, heat stro...
• Man vs. Wild (Sahara) Clips from several episodes.
(Optional) Covers animal some animal adaptations,
hyperthermia, and l...
• You can now complete this question on
page 3 of your bundled homework.
• You can now complete this question on
page 3 of your bundled homework.
• On the other end of the spectrum, too much
water can hurt a plant or animal. Too wet
will cause fungal growth.
Copyright...
• Many tropical plants have drip tips so that
water falls away from leaf and plant.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Many tropical plants have drip tips so that
water falls away from leaf and plant.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Lab Project with Isopods
– Groups can decide to conduct project about
– Light and Isopod movement
– Moisture and Isopod ...
• We will used mixed Isopods
• – The pillbug (Armadillidium vulgare)
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Or the Sowbug (Porcellio scaber).
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug?
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Pillbugs can roll into a ball. Sowbugs
cannot.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Observation of Isopods
– Make a detailed sketch of an Isopod,and
describe it’s behaviors.
– Make sketch accurate, count
...
• Drawing might look like this.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• The first two appendages on the male
abdomen are modified as elongated sex
organs.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• On the underside, females have leaf-like
growths at base of some legs.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• On the underside, females have leaf-like
growths at base of some legs.
– These brood pouches hold developing eggs and
em...
• Scientific method: A process that is the
basis for scientific inquiry (questioning
and experimenting).
Copyright © 2010 ...
• Scientific method: A process that is the
basis for scientific inquiry (questioning
and experimenting).
Copyright © 2010 ...
• Scientific method: A process that is the
basis for scientific inquiry (questioning
and experimenting).
Copyright © 2010 ...
• Scientific method: A process that is the
basis for scientific inquiry (questioning
and experimenting).
Copyright © 2010 ...
• Scientific method: A process that is the
basis for scientific inquiry (questioning
and experimenting).
Copyright © 2010 ...
• Activity! Sketching out the scientific
method.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
• Activity! Sketching out the scientific
method.
– This requires a full page and will look like the
example on the next pa...
Observe
Add to
background
information
Form a new
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental gro...
Observe
and question
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Observe
Collect
background
information
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan...
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a
Hypothesis
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental group.
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental group....
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental group....
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental group....
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a new
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental gr...
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a new
Hypothesis
Create a new
experiment with a
control group and
experimental...
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a new
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental gr...
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a new
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental gr...
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a new
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental gr...
Observe
Collect
background
information
Form a new
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental gr...
Observe
Add to
background
information
Form a new
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental gro...
Observe
Add to
background
information
Form a new
Hypothesis
Create an
experiment with a
control group and
experimental gro...
• Activity! Creating your own study about
Isopods.
– We will be collecting data periodically over the
next week.
Copyright...
• Isopod Research Sheet
• Isopod Research Sheet
• Information / Research Available Sheet.
• Information / Research Available Sheet.
• Some general questions.
– How are isopods connected to abiotic factors.
• Moisture, temperature, light, soil, etc.
– Wha...
• Gathering background information on
Terrestrial Isopods.
– Use the science name for the internet search.
– Find general ...
• Experiments search for cause and effect
relationships in nature.
• These changing quantities are called
variables.
• Does your grade depend on how much
time you spend on your work?
• Does your grade depend on how much
time you spend on your work?
– The dependent variable depends on other
factors (how m...
• Does your grade depend on how much
time you spend on your work?
– The dependent variable depends on other
factors (how m...
• Does your grade depend on how much
time you spend on your work?
– The dependent variable depends on other
factors (how m...
• Variable: Changing quantity of something.
– -
– -
– -
• Independent: (Change) The variable you
have control over, what you can choose
and manipulate.
• Independent: (Change) The variable you
have control over, what you can choose
and manipulate.
• Dependent: (Observe) What you measure
in the experiment and what is affected
during the experiment.
• Control: (Same) Quantities that a scientist
wants to remain constant so it’s a fair test.
Everything is exactly the same...
• Control: (Same) Quantities that a scientist
wants to remain constant so it’s a fair test.
Everything is exactly the same...
Problem Independent
Variable
(Change)
Dependent
Variable
(Observe)
Control
Variable
(Same)
Does fertilizer
help a plant
to...
Problem Independent
Variable
(Change)
Dependent
Variable
(Observe)
Control
Variable
(Same)
Does fertilizer
help a plant
to...
Problem Independent
Variable
(Change)
Dependent
Variable
(Observe)
Control
Variable
(Same)
Does fertilizer
help a plant
to...
Problem Independent
Variable
(Change)
Dependent
Variable
(Observe)
Control
Variable
(Same)
Does fertilizer
help a plant
to...
Problem Independent
Variable
(Change)
Dependent
Variable
(Observe)
Control
Variable
(Same)
Does fertilizer
help a plant
to...
Problem Independent
Variable
(Change)
Dependent
Variable
(Observe)
Control
Variable
(Same)
Does fertilizer
help a plant
to...
Problem Independent
Variable
(Change)
Dependent
Variable
(Observe)
Control
Variable
(Same)
Does fertilizer
help a plant
to...
Problem Independent
Variable
(Change)
Dependent
Variable
(Observe)
Control
Variable
(Same)
Does fertilizer
help a plant
to...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke
blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages
the plant. The student g...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student use four containers.
The first container only contain...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if worms help
plants grow. The student uses four
containers. The first container only contai...
• A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet
environment over a dry one. The student creates a
chamber with two ...
• A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet
environment over a dry one. The student creates a
chamber with two ...
• A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet
environment over a dry one. The student creates a
chamber with two ...
• A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet
environment over a dry one. The student creates a
chamber with two ...
• A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet
environment over a dry one. The student creates a
chamber with two ...
• A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet
environment over a dry one. The student creates a
chamber with two ...
• A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet
environment over a dry one. The student creates a
chamber with two ...
• A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet
environment over a dry one. The student creates a
chamber with two ...
• A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet
environment over a dry one. The student creates a
chamber with two ...
• Isopod Lab Project Requirements
A.) This is a partner project. One lab partner, both have to
write independent reports.
...
• Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available
Sheet.
• Set-up for the effects of moisture in
selected Isopod species.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
DoorwayPetri-dish
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
DoorwayPetri-dish
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
DoorwayPetri-dish
Day of Control for all groups:
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
DoorwayPetri-dish
Day of Control for all groups: So that we
can see what normal Isopod mov...
• Activity! Isopods and Temperature.
– This is one is a bit different. On one day the
containers are placed upon ice sitti...
• Activity! Isopods and Temperature.
– This is one is a bit different. On one day the
containers are placed upon ice sitti...
• Set-up for light / phototaxis in selected
Isopod species.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
DoorwayPetri-dish
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Dark and Moist Light and Moist
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Light and Moist Light and Moist
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Light and Moist Light and Moist
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Light and Moist Light and Moist
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Light and Moist Light and Moist
• Spreadsheets for collecting data are
provided in the activities folder.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
Light Dark
Dave Smith Isopod Movement Light and Dark 1/16/12
Moist Dry
Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12
Moist Dry
Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12
Place ten Isopods into the two roomed
container. Count the numb...
Moist Dry
Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12
Total at the end. The total must = 300 as
30 minutes x 10 = 300.
Moist Dry
Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12
Total at the end. The total must = 300 as
30 minutes x 10 = 300...
Moist Dry
Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12
Total at the end. The total must = 300 as
30 minutes x 10 = 300...
Moist Dry
Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12
Total at the end. The total must = 300 as
30 minutes x 10 = 300...
Moist Dry
Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12
Total at the end. The total must = 300 as
30 minutes x 10 = 300...
Please record the number of Isopods that
cross into a new room for thirty minutes.
Use the check system. = 5
• Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available
Sheet.
• Please complete the four terms below as they
relate to the project you have selected.
– Problem:
– Independent Variable:...
• The set-up of your experiment.
1.) Have everything be the same if your study uses
more than one environment except for t...
• Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available
Sheet.
• Video Link! (Optional) Isopod Lab Info and Set-up
– Ignore the minute about fruit flies and mating which
teacher should ...
• Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available
Sheet.
• Please complete the following in your
journal.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the ...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available
Sheet.
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Please complete the following in your
journal / Sheet.
– Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and f...
• Isopods: Writing a lab report available sheet.
• Isopod lab report example available sheet.
• You can now complete this question on
page 4 of your bundled homework.
• You can now complete this question on
page 4 of your bundled homework.
• More Units Available at…
Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics
Unit, The Astronomy Topic...
• “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and
Literacy Opportunity Worksheet
– Visit some of the many provided links or..
– Art...
• “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and
Literacy Opportunity Worksheet
– Visit some of the many provided links or..
– Art...
• This PowerPoint is one small part of my Ecology
Abiotic Factors Unit. This unit includes…
• A 4 Part 2,400+ Slide PowerP...
Areas of Focus within The Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit
Abiotic Factors, Biotic Factors, The Big 7 Abiotic Factors, Organi...
• More Units Available at…
Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics
Unit, The Astronomy Topic...
• Please visit the links below to learn more
about each of the units in this curriculum
– These units take me about four y...
Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide
Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_In...
• The entire four year curriculum can be found at...
http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to
contact me with any...
• Thank you for your time and interest in this
curriculum tour. Please visit the welcome / guide on
how a unit works and l...
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint
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Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint

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This PowerPoint was one very small part of my Ecology Interactions Unit from the website http://sciencepowerpoint.com/index.html .This unit includes a 3 part 2000+ Slide PowerPoint loaded with activities, project ideas, critical class notes (red slides), review opportunities, challenge questions with answers, 3 PowerPoint review games (125 slides each) and much more. A bundled homework package and detailed unit notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow.
Areas of Focus within The Ecology Interactions Unit: Levels of Biological Organization (Ecology), Parts of the Biosphere, Habitat, Ecological Niche, Types of Competition, Competitive Exclusion Theory, Animal Interactions, Food Webs, Predator Prey Relationships, Camouflage, Population Sampling, Abundance, Relative Abundance, Diversity, Mimicry, Batesian Mimicry, Mullerian Mimicry, Symbiosis, Parasitism, Mutualism, Commensalism, Plant and Animal Interactions, Coevolution, Animal Strategies to Eat Plants, Plant Defense Mechanisms, Exotic Species, Impacts of Invasive Exotic Species. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thank you again and best wishes.

Sincerely,
Ryan Murphy M.Ed
www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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Ecology Abiotic Factors, Moisture, Animals and Plants, Isopod Lab Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • Which makes more sense to plant in a dry climate? Native deep rooted grasses or non-native grasses? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2.  New Abiotic Factor: Water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. • Water availability varies greatly on this planet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  4. 4. • Water availability varies greatly on this planet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • Water is essential for life, and all organisms depend on it. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  6. 6. • Homework Question: Describe some of the adaptations displayed by plants and animals to survive with low water availability. – Work on bundled homework instead of your journal as we cover them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7. • Water requirements and plants. – - – - – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8. • Hydrophytes: Plants which grow in water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9. • Mesophytes: Plants with average water needs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10. • Xerophytes: Plants which grow in dry environments. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11. • Adaptations of plants to survive with minimal water include. – - – - – -
  12. 12. • Using stomata: Structures that can close to keep water in when dry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13. • Using stomata: Structures that can close to keep water in when dry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. • Thick waxy cuticles to keep water in (succulents, cacti) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. • Small leaves, or absence of leaves. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17. • Water storage tissues.
  18. 18. • Which makes more sense to plant in a dry climate? Native deep rooted grasses or non-native grasses? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  19. 19. • Answer! Deep rooted native grasses do not require constant watering to survive and should be planted in areas with water shortages. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20. • Deep roots
  21. 21. • Deep roots
  22. 22. • There is a growing movement to plant native species as a front lawn instead of grass. Lots of advantages to the ecosystem. – Are there any disadvantages? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23. • There is a growing movement to plant native species as a front lawn instead of grass. Lots of advantages to the ecosystem. – Are there any disadvantages? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24. • You can’t play backyard sports . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. • You can’t play backyard sports . “Mom” “Billy lost the ball in the native vegetation.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27. • How animals have adapted to low water availability? – - – - – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • Body covering can limit water loss. – Insect chitin can keep in water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • Body tissue that retain water.
  30. 30. • Some small animals can absorb water from the air in morning (dew), then go underground. – Rare desert frogs and some insects. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31. • Eat prey items that are full of water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32. • Have really dry feces.
  33. 33. • Come out only at night. Nocturnal.
  34. 34. • Seek shade, and live underground.
  35. 35. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  44. 44. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  45. 45. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • Let’s give it a shot. – Pretend you see a few things that may not be there. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Video Links (Optional) • (Man vs. Wild (Sahara) – Preview before viewing with students. – Covers, dehydration, heat stroke, plants and animals adaptations to the desert and more. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • Man vs. Wild (Sahara) Clips from several episodes. (Optional) Covers animal some animal adaptations, hyperthermia, and life in the desert. • Part I: – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeyHvX5rTpo • Part II: – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cfe2MXBwX_c&feature=results_vi deo&playnext=1&list=PL8D0B13A49A106838 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufn-Jo4MR5g&feature=related • Part III: – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufn- Jo4MR5g&feature=results_video&playnext=1&list=PL8D0B13A49A1 06838 • Part IV: – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2woVS77Hww&feature=results_vi deo&playnext=1&list=PL8D0B13A49A106838
  52. 52. • You can now complete this question on page 3 of your bundled homework.
  53. 53. • You can now complete this question on page 3 of your bundled homework.
  54. 54. • On the other end of the spectrum, too much water can hurt a plant or animal. Too wet will cause fungal growth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55. • Many tropical plants have drip tips so that water falls away from leaf and plant. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56. • Many tropical plants have drip tips so that water falls away from leaf and plant. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. • Lab Project with Isopods – Groups can decide to conduct project about – Light and Isopod movement – Moisture and Isopod movement – Temperature and Isopod movement Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. • We will used mixed Isopods • – The pillbug (Armadillidium vulgare) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. Or the Sowbug (Porcellio scaber). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. • Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • Which is a Pillbug, and which is a Sowbug? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Pillbugs can roll into a ball. Sowbugs cannot. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. • Observation of Isopods – Make a detailed sketch of an Isopod,and describe it’s behaviors. – Make sketch accurate, count segments, legs, antennae. – Make observations about the Isopods behaviors and how it’s sensing the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  67. 67. • Drawing might look like this. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. • The first two appendages on the male abdomen are modified as elongated sex organs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • On the underside, females have leaf-like growths at base of some legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. • On the underside, females have leaf-like growths at base of some legs. – These brood pouches hold developing eggs and embryos. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. • Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. • Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. • Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. • Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • Activity! Sketching out the scientific method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. • Activity! Sketching out the scientific method. – This requires a full page and will look like the example on the next page when done. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. Observe Add to background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Everything in the experiment should be the same except for the independent variable which is the one thing that is different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. Observe and question Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81. Observe Collect background information Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis
  83. 83. Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group.
  84. 84. Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Reject hypothesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  87. 87. Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Reject hypothesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88. Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create a new experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Reject hypothesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89. Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90. Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  92. 92. Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93. Observe Add to background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94. Observe Add to background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Everything in the experiment should be the same except for the independent variable which is the one thing that is different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. • Activity! Creating your own study about Isopods. – We will be collecting data periodically over the next week. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96. • Isopod Research Sheet
  97. 97. • Isopod Research Sheet
  98. 98. • Information / Research Available Sheet.
  99. 99. • Information / Research Available Sheet.
  100. 100. • Some general questions. – How are isopods connected to abiotic factors. • Moisture, temperature, light, soil, etc. – What is an isopod? – Where do isopods live? – What do they eat? – What is their reproductive cycle? – What is their importance (niche) and how do they impact people? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  101. 101. • Gathering background information on Terrestrial Isopods. – Use the science name for the internet search. – Find general knowledge first, then focus. – Make focus on the pill bug and abiotic factors – Find a source that is at your ability. – Record the website address, title, author, year. Cite sources using APA and Son of Citation Machine. – http://citationmachine.net/index2.php Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102. • Experiments search for cause and effect relationships in nature. • These changing quantities are called variables.
  103. 103. • Does your grade depend on how much time you spend on your work?
  104. 104. • Does your grade depend on how much time you spend on your work? – The dependent variable depends on other factors (how much you studied, effort, etc.)
  105. 105. • Does your grade depend on how much time you spend on your work? – The dependent variable depends on other factors (how much you studied, effort, etc.) – Independent variable is the one you have control over (how much you studied).
  106. 106. • Does your grade depend on how much time you spend on your work? – The dependent variable depends on other factors (how much you studied, effort, etc.) – Independent variable is the one you have control over (how much you studied). • You have control over your grades.
  107. 107. • Variable: Changing quantity of something. – - – - – -
  108. 108. • Independent: (Change) The variable you have control over, what you can choose and manipulate.
  109. 109. • Independent: (Change) The variable you have control over, what you can choose and manipulate.
  110. 110. • Dependent: (Observe) What you measure in the experiment and what is affected during the experiment.
  111. 111. • Control: (Same) Quantities that a scientist wants to remain constant so it’s a fair test. Everything is exactly the same except for the independent variable.
  112. 112. • Control: (Same) Quantities that a scientist wants to remain constant so it’s a fair test. Everything is exactly the same except for the independent variable.
  113. 113. Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
  114. 114. Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
  115. 115. Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
  116. 116. Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
  117. 117. Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
  118. 118. Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
  119. 119. Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
  120. 120. Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
  121. 121. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The students injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The students records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  122. 122. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The students records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  123. 123. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The students records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  124. 124. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  125. 125. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  126. 126. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  127. 127. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  128. 128. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  129. 129. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  130. 130. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  131. 131. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  132. 132. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  133. 133. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  134. 134. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers. • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  135. 135. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers. • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  136. 136. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers. • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  137. 137. • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers. • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
  138. 138. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student use four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  139. 139. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  140. 140. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  141. 141. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  142. 142. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water
  143. 143. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  144. 144. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  145. 145. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  146. 146. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  147. 147. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  148. 148. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  149. 149. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  150. 150. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water,
  151. 151. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control =
  152. 152. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control =
  153. 153. • A student wants to find out if worms help plants grow. The student uses four containers. The first container only contains soil. The remaining containers are given increasing numbers of worms. The same numbers of small plants are placed in each and given the same soil and growing conditions. • Problem? = Do worms help plants grow? • Independent Variable = Worms • Dependent Variable = Fitness of Plants • Control = Same soil, sunlight, water, etc.
  154. 154. • A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet environment over a dry one. The student creates a chamber with two rooms and one door. One environment has a moist floor and the other is dry. Pillbugs are placed into the chamber and their location recorded every minute for an extended time period. • Problem? = Do Sow Bugs prefer a moist environment? • Independent Variable = Moisture • Dependent Variable = Number of Sow Bugs in each room. • Control = Same light, chamber, no food etc.
  155. 155. • A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet environment over a dry one. The student creates a chamber with two rooms and one door. One environment has a moist floor and the other is dry. Pillbugs are placed into the chamber and their location recorded every minute for an extended time period. • Problem? = Do Sow Bugs prefer a moist environment? • Independent Variable = Moisture • Dependent Variable = Number of Sow Bugs in each room. • Control = Same light, chamber, no food etc.
  156. 156. • A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet environment over a dry one. The student creates a chamber with two rooms and one door. One environment has a moist floor and the other is dry. Pillbugs are placed into the chamber and their location recorded every minute for an extended time period. • Problem? = Do Sow Bugs prefer a moist environment? • Independent Variable = Mositure • Dependent Variable = Number of Sow Bugs in each room. • Control = Same light, chamber, no food etc.
  157. 157. • A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet environment over a dry one. The student creates a chamber with two rooms and one door. One environment has a moist floor and the other is dry. Pillbugs are placed into the chamber and their location recorded every minute for an extended time period. • Problem? = Do Sow Bugs prefer a moist environment? • Independent Variable = Moisture • Dependent Variable = Number of Sow Bugs in each room. • Control = Same light, chamber, no food etc.
  158. 158. • A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet environment over a dry one. The student creates a chamber with two rooms and one door. One environment has a moist floor and the other is dry. Pillbugs are placed into the chamber and their location recorded every minute for an extended time period. • Problem? = Do Sow Bugs prefer a moist environment? • Independent Variable = Moisture • Dependent Variable = Number of Sow Bugs in each room. • Control = Same light, chamber, no food etc.
  159. 159. • A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet environment over a dry one. The student creates a chamber with two rooms and one door. One environment has a moist floor and the other is dry. Pillbugs are placed into the chamber and their location recorded every minute for an extended time period. • Problem? = Do Sow Bugs prefer a moist environment? • Independent Variable = Moisture • Dependent Variable = Number of Sow Bugs in each room. • Control = Same light, chamber, no food etc.
  160. 160. • A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet environment over a dry one. The student creates a chamber with two rooms and one door. One environment has a moist floor and the other is dry. Pillbugs are placed into the chamber and their location recorded every minute for an extended time period. • Problem? = Do Sow Bugs prefer a moist environment? • Independent Variable = Moisture • Dependent Variable = Number of Sow Bugs in each room. • Control = Same light, chamber, no food etc.
  161. 161. • A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet environment over a dry one. The student creates a chamber with two rooms and one door. One environment has a moist floor and the other is dry. Pillbugs are placed into the chamber and their location recorded every minute for an extended time period. • Problem? = Do Sow Bugs prefer a moist environment? • Independent Variable = Moisture • Dependent Variable = Number of Sow Bugs in each room. • Control = Same light, chamber, no food etc.
  162. 162. • A student wants to find out if Sow Bugs prefer a wet environment over a dry one. The student creates a chamber with two rooms and one door. One environment has a moist floor and the other is dry. Pillbugs are placed into the chamber and their location recorded every minute for an extended time period. • Problem? = Do Sow Bugs prefer a moist environment? • Independent Variable = Moisture • Dependent Variable = Number of Sow Bugs in each room. • Control = Same light, chamber, no food etc.
  163. 163. • Isopod Lab Project Requirements A.) This is a partner project. One lab partner, both have to write independent reports. B.) Project needs to be a testable question. C.) Project needs to be quantifiable, that is, collects numerical data. D.) Project needs to be completed in less than a week. E.) Project cannot harm Isopods. F.) Set-up must occur swiftly so data can be collected in class. (5 min set-up daily over week) G.) Project cannot be overly distracting to other groups. H.) Learn more… http://www.biologycorner.com/worksheets/isopod_behavior_lab%28nore port%29.html Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164. • Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available Sheet.
  165. 165. • Set-up for the effects of moisture in selected Isopod species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy DoorwayPetri-dish
  166. 166. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy DoorwayPetri-dish
  167. 167. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy DoorwayPetri-dish Day of Control for all groups:
  168. 168. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy DoorwayPetri-dish Day of Control for all groups: So that we can see what normal Isopod movement would be and can thus compare.
  169. 169. • Activity! Isopods and Temperature. – This is one is a bit different. On one day the containers are placed upon ice sitting in a tray to chill the entire environment. – The number of Isopods that cross into a new room is recorded using a check system for a 30 minute period. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Moist and cold temperatures Day 1 Moist and cold temperatures Day 1
  170. 170. • Activity! Isopods and Temperature. – This is one is a bit different. On one day the containers are placed upon ice sitting in a tray to chill the entire environment. – The number of Isopods that cross into a new room is recorded using a check system for a 30 minute period. – The next day is conducted at room temp. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Moist and warm temperatures Day 2 Room Temp Moist and warm temperatures Day 2 Room Temp
  171. 171. • Set-up for light / phototaxis in selected Isopod species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy DoorwayPetri-dish
  172. 172. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Dark and Moist Light and Moist
  173. 173. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Light and Moist Light and Moist
  174. 174. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Light and Moist Light and Moist
  175. 175. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Light and Moist Light and Moist
  176. 176. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Light and Moist Light and Moist
  177. 177. • Spreadsheets for collecting data are provided in the activities folder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. Light Dark Dave Smith Isopod Movement Light and Dark 1/16/12
  179. 179. Moist Dry Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12
  180. 180. Moist Dry Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12 Place ten Isopods into the two roomed container. Count the number of Isopods in each room at the 1 minute mark for 30 minutes. Make observations throughout study and record in the spaces.
  181. 181. Moist Dry Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12 Total at the end. The total must = 300 as 30 minutes x 10 = 300.
  182. 182. Moist Dry Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12 Total at the end. The total must = 300 as 30 minutes x 10 = 300. 25 275????
  183. 183. Moist Dry Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12 Total at the end. The total must = 300 as 30 minutes x 10 = 300. 25 275
  184. 184. Moist Dry Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12 Total at the end. The total must = 300 as 30 minutes x 10 = 300. 165 ????
  185. 185. Moist Dry Dave Smith Isopod Movement Moist and Dry 1/16/12 Total at the end. The total must = 300 as 30 minutes x 10 = 300. 165 135
  186. 186. Please record the number of Isopods that cross into a new room for thirty minutes. Use the check system. = 5
  187. 187. • Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available Sheet.
  188. 188. • Please complete the four terms below as they relate to the project you have selected. – Problem: – Independent Variable: – Dependent Variable: – Control: – What will you need from me? – What can you supply? – What problems do you foresee? – Can you create a spreadsheet to organize your data? – Can you sketch out the containers / how they will be organized?
  189. 189. • The set-up of your experiment. 1.) Have everything be the same if your study uses more than one environment except for the one thing you are testing. (independent variable). 2.) Collect data with location every minute, or how often an Isopod does something, or amount of food eaten etc. 3.) Organize data neatly on the spreadsheet that is provided. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190. • Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available Sheet.
  191. 191. • Video Link! (Optional) Isopod Lab Info and Set-up – Ignore the minute about fruit flies and mating which teacher should view prior. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSKkecFzD50
  192. 192. • Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available Sheet.
  193. 193. • Please complete the following in your journal. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. (Example) • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Total Dark = 260
  197. 197. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Total Dark = 260 Total Light = 40
  198. 198. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Total Dark = 260 Total Light = 40 260/30
  199. 199. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Total Dark = 260 Total Light = 40 260/30 40/30
  200. 200. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Total Dark = 260 Total Light = 40 260/30 40/30
  201. 201. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Total Dark = 260 Total Light = 40 260/30 40/30 Dark Average = 8.66
  202. 202. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Total Dark = 260 Total Light = 40 260/30 40/30 Dark Average = 8.66 Light Average = 1.33
  203. 203. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Total Dark = 260 Total Light = 40 260/30 40/30 Dark Average = 8.66 Light Average = 1.33
  204. 204. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  205. 205. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. • Isopod Investigation Lab Set-up Available Sheet.
  207. 207. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Create a column graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Isopods in Dark Isopods in Light
  208. 208. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Or create a pie graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. • Please complete the following in your journal / Sheet. – Add the total number of Isopods in the light and the dark and find the average. • Total number of that group divided by time (30). – Or create a pie graph comparing averages. – Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did they prefer a particular environment? • Base your answer on your data, include in response. What does the data tell you? – How could we improve this study? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Isopods in Dark Isopods in Light
  210. 210. • Isopods: Writing a lab report available sheet.
  211. 211. • Isopod lab report example available sheet.
  212. 212. • You can now complete this question on page 4 of your bundled homework.
  213. 213. • You can now complete this question on page 4 of your bundled homework.
  214. 214. • More Units Available at… Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and The Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit. Copyright © 2011 www.sciencepowerpoint.com LLC.
  215. 215. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tst Please visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet
  216. 216. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p=1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
  217. 217. • This PowerPoint is one small part of my Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit. This unit includes… • A 4 Part 2,400+ Slide PowerPoint • 14 page bundled homework packaged that chronologically follows PowerPoint, + modified version • 16 pages of unit notes with visuals • 2 PowerPoint review games • Rubrics, Answer Keys, games, and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_F actors_Unit.html
  218. 218. Areas of Focus within The Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit Abiotic Factors, Biotic Factors, The Big 7 Abiotic Factors, Organisms Range of Tolerance, Light, How light affects Organisms, Photosynthesis, Factors in the Environment that Affect the Amount of Light, How Organisms Movements are affected by light, Bioluminescence, How temperature affects organisms, Thermoregulation, Physiological Regulation, Behavioral Regulation, Adaptation, Hypothermia, Hyperthermia, Warm- Bloodedness (endothermy), Cold-Bloodedness, Hibernation / Torpor, Advantages of Warm- Bloodedness, Disadvantages of Warm-Bloodedness, Advantages of Cold- Bloodedness, Disadvantages of Cold-Bloodedness, Water, Water Requirements and Plants, Adaptations of Plants and Water, Adaptations of Animals and Water, Wind, Positives and Negatives of Wind to Organisms, How animals use Wind, How Plants use Wind, Wind Dispersal, Water Dispersal, McArthur-Wilson Island Biogeography Theory, Animal Seed Dispersal, Fire Ecology, Fire Dependence, Biogeochemical Cycles, Water Cycle, Carbon Cycle, Photosynthesis, Cellular Respiration, Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Balance, Nitrogen Cycle, Phosphorus Cycle, Importance of Phosphorus, Nutrients, Nutrient Pollution and Aquatic Systems, Eutrophification. Full Unit can be found at… http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  219. 219. • More Units Available at… Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and The Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit. Copyright © 2011 www.sciencepowerpoint.com LLC.
  220. 220. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  221. 221. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  222. 222. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
  223. 223. • Thank you for your time and interest in this curriculum tour. Please visit the welcome / guide on how a unit works and link to the many unit previews to see the PowerPoint slideshows, bundled homework, review games, unit notes, and much more. Thank you for your interest and please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Best wishes. • Sincerely, • Ryan Murphy M.Ed • ryemurf@gmail.com

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