Ecology Abiotic Factors Lesson PowerPoint, Temperature, Animals and Plants

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This PowerPoint was one very small part of my Ecology Interactions Unit from the website http://sciencepowerpoint.com/index.html .This unit includes a 3 part 2000+ Slide PowerPoint loaded with activities, project ideas, critical class notes (red slides), review opportunities, challenge questions with answers, 3 PowerPoint review games (125 slides each) and much more. A bundled homework package and detailed unit notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow.
Areas of Focus within The Ecology Interactions Unit: Levels of Biological Organization (Ecology), Parts of the Biosphere, Habitat, Ecological Niche, Types of Competition, Competitive Exclusion Theory, Animal Interactions, Food Webs, Predator Prey Relationships, Camouflage, Population Sampling, Abundance, Relative Abundance, Diversity, Mimicry, Batesian Mimicry, Mullerian Mimicry, Symbiosis, Parasitism, Mutualism, Commensalism, Plant and Animal Interactions, Coevolution, Animal Strategies to Eat Plants, Plant Defense Mechanisms, Exotic Species, Impacts of Invasive Exotic Species. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thank you again and best wishes.

Sincerely,
Ryan Murphy M.Ed
www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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Ecology Abiotic Factors Lesson PowerPoint, Temperature, Animals and Plants

  1. 1. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2.  New Abiotic Factor: Temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3.  New Abiotic Factor: Temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  4. 4.  Temperature can effect organisms by…  -  -  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5.  Causing flowers to open and close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  6. 6.  Causing flowers to open and close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy OPEN
  7. 7.  Causing flowers to open and close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CLOSED
  8. 8.  Causing seeds to germinate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9.  Causing seeds to germinate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10.  Causing seeds to germinate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Germinate:
  11. 11.  Causing seeds to germinate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Germinate: To cause a seed to grow.
  12. 12.  Causing seeds to germinate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Germinate: To cause a seed to grow.
  13. 13. • Some seeds require a freeze before they germinate. – Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. • Answer: – The winter could kill the young plant. – Growing in the Spring, and having the summer and fall ensures a strong first growing season. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15.  Causes some trees to drop their leaves. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. • Why do deciduous trees drop their leaves in the fall? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17. • Answer! The water inside the leaves will freeze, not allowing photosynthesis to occur, and killing the leaf. – “If you don’t use it, lose it.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18. • Leaves would also be a place for ice and snow to collect during the winter. – This extra weight would certainly snap the branches.
  19. 19. • Conifer trees do drop needles, they’re growing and dropping throughout the year. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20. • Conifer trees photosynthesize all year because they have a sap antifreeze. – Broadleaf deciduous trees can create more sugar but not during the winter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21.  Affects the activity in warm and cold blooded animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22.  Affects the activity in warm and cold blooded animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23.  Affects the activity in warm and cold blooded animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24.  Affects the activity in warm and cold blooded animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25.  Creates huge temperature swings in the desert from day to night. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26.  Creates huge temperature swings in the desert from day to night. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27.  Creates huge temperature swings in the desert from day to night. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28.  Creating seasonal changes in temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • Seasonal changes in temperature causes many animals to migrate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  30. 30. • Area of focus within temperature: Thermoregulation.
  31. 31. • Area of focus within temperature: Thermoregulation.
  32. 32. • What did you wear to school today? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  33. 33.  Thermoregulation is the ability of an organism to keep its body temperature within certain boundaries. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  34. 34. • Thermoregulation is the ability of an organism to keep its body temperature within certain boundaries. – Remember the range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I am feeling light headed.” “That’s weird, I’ve only been in here for 1 hour.”
  36. 36. • Our bodies have a range of tolerance. – Know your range and don’t over do it. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37.  Two types of thermoregulation  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38.  Physiological regulation.
  39. 39.  Behavioral regulation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40.  Behavioral: Actions or reactions of an organism to the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41.  Behavioral thermoregulation examples.  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42.  Move to a warmer or cooler place. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Many animals make dens that help keep the animal warm / cool and dry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  44. 44. • Live close to the ground, Many Blueberries live close to ground to absorb heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  45. 45. • Lizards change their locations frequently throughout the day to regulate their body temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • Lizards change their locations frequently throughout the day to regulate their body temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • Lizards change their locations frequently throughout the day to regulate their body temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. • Lizards change their locations frequently throughout the day to regulate their body temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • Lizards change their locations frequently throughout the day to regulate their body temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Lizards change their locations frequently throughout the day to regulate their body temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • Lizards change their locations frequently throughout the day to regulate their body temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • Lizards change their locations frequently throughout the day to regulate their body temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. • Lizards change their locations frequently throughout the day to regulate their body temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • Activity! Each table group make a small den out of binders and books at your table. – Make a lizard out of clay or paper. – Move lizard around desk and burrow as the day changes in the slideshow.
  55. 55. • Another strategy is to go inside for the winter.
  56. 56.  Change posture in one place. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. • By raising off of the ground, more air travels under the lizard, cooling it down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. • By facing the sun, the lizard will minimize the amount of light that will hit its skin, and thus cooling it down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. • Even plants will use position to the sun to stay cool. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. • Activity! Feeling how superposition can affect heat loss. (Next slide is white to show heat waves) – Danger! Plate is dangerously hot! – About a foot above hot plate. • Feel air above hot plate with hand horizontal. • Feel air above hot plate with hand vertical. • Was there a difference? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • Use your tail to shade you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62.  Adding layers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • When it’s cold, take a warm bath in a hot spring like these Japanese Macaque. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • When it’s cold, take a warm bath in a hot spring like these Japanese Macaque. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Ahhh that feels good, Just a bit to the left.”
  65. 65. • Video Link! (Optional) Japanese Macaque – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhM_v5S OPaI
  66. 66. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “You should go put on a coat.”
  67. 67. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • Rubbing hands creates friction / heat. – Everybody try. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. • Sticking your hands into your armpits also helps.
  72. 72. • This technique can help you conserve body heat in the ocean to prevent hypothermia / death.
  73. 73.  Physiological: The functions of the body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • Are the pictures below a behavioral or physiological adaptation to cold temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. • Answer! Behavioral. The animals can control to roll up to conserve heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. • Adaptation: A process whereby an organism becomes better suited to its habitat. – Characteristic which aids survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • Adaptation: A process whereby an organism becomes better suited to its habitat. – Characteristic which aids survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. • Adaptation: A process whereby an organism becomes better suited to its habitat. – Characteristic which aids survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • Adaptation: A process whereby an organism becomes better suited to its habitat. – Characteristic which aids survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80.  Physiological adaptations to temperature.  These you generally cannot control, and your body does them automatically.  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81.  Physiological adaptations to temperature.  These you generally cannot control, and your body does them automatically.  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82.  Utilize evaporation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83. • Sweat Glands: As you sweat the water on your skin is evaporated and the phase change pulls heat from your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84. • From breathing or panting. “I have no sweat glands!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • Changes in circulation of blood. – Many marine mammals and fish. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • Changes in circulation of blood. – Many marine mammals and fish. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  87. 87. • To stay warm, some marine mammals have their circulatory system set up so warm blood moves to their core before going to the skin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88. • To stay warm, some marine mammals have their circulatory system set up so warm blood moves to their core before going to the skin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Marine mammals and thermoregulation. Learn more at… http://what-when-how.com/marine- mammals/thermoregulation-marine-mammals/
  89. 89.  Growing or losing insulation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. • The more air you trap in your fur or feathers the better insulated you will be. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  92. 92. • The more air you trap in your fur or feathers the better insulated you will be. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93. • Even insects will grow more setae (fur-like) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94. • Put on weight / layers of insulating fat (blubber). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95.  Have thermal windows (Ears). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96. • You want big windows to cool down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. • Where is the coolest place on this elephant? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. • Where is the coolest place on this elephant? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  99. 99. • Where is the coolest place on this elephant? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. • The African Elephant has large ears because its environment is very hot. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  101. 101. • The African Elephant has large ears because its environment is very hot. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102. • The Asian Elephant lives in a cooler environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  103. 103. • The Asian Elephant lives in a cooler environment. They have smaller ears. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  104. 104. • Which one lives in the warmer climate?
  105. 105. • Which one lives in the warmer climate?
  106. 106. • These windows are usually thin membranes with a lot of blood flow through them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  107. 107. • Frilled Neck Lizard: Used to scare away predators and some thermoregulation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108. • Thermal windows have been around for millions of years. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109. • Thermal windows have been around for millions of years. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. • The Maasai in Kenya are tall and thin, adapted for maximum heat loss in the heat of East Africa. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111. • If you live in a cold environment, then you will usually have small ears to retain your heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112. • If you live in a cold environment, then you will usually have small ears to retain your heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  113. 113. • If you live in a cold environment, then you will usually have small ears to retain your heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Retain:
  114. 114. • If you live in a cold environment, then you will usually have small ears to retain your heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Retain: To hold on to, keep possession.
  115. 115. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  116. 116. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  117. 117. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  118. 118. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  119. 119. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  120. 120. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  121. 121. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  122. 122. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  123. 123. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  125. 125. • The Inuit of the Arctic are short and squat, perfectly adapted for retaining heat in the cold winter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  126. 126. • Who is more adapted to live in a hot dry climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  127. 127. • Who is more adapted to live in a hot dry climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I’m sweating like a wild beast out here!”
  128. 128. • Who is more adapted to live in a cold wet climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  129. 129. “Get me out of here!” “I’m freezing!”
  130. 130.  Shivering: Muscles contract and relax when it is cold, this generates heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  131. 131. • Teeth chattering: A form of localized shivering. It means your cold. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  132. 132.  Goosebumps: Skin muscles tighten, forming bumps, which cause your hairs to raise, trapping more air and keeping you warmer. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  133. 133. • Ecology Abiotic Factors Available Sheet.
  134. 134. • Activity Simulation! Going Outside to Experience Physiological and Behavioral Thermoregulation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  135. 135. • Activity Simulation! Going Outside to Experience Physiological and Behavioral Thermoregulation. – Note: I’m not trying to just freeze you, I am hoping you learn about the messages your body is telling you in response to the cold. Hopefully you will recognize these and make necessary adjustments in thermoregulation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136. • Activity Simulation! Going Outside to Experience Physiological and Behavioral Thermoregulation. – Note: I’m not trying to just freeze you, I am hoping you learn about the messages your body is telling you in response to the cold. Hopefully you will recognize these and make necessary adjustments in thermoregulation. – Let me know if you are too cold. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  137. 137. • Please record the time the following occur. Thermoregulation Time Shivering P Teeth Chattering P Goosebumps P Cold Dance B Rubbing of Arms B Hugging Yourself B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  138. 138. • Ecology Abiotic Factors Available Sheet.
  139. 139. • Outside simulation: Some will become cold quickly, others will not. If you need to go inside, you will be allowed. – What physical, and behavioral adaptations to cold temperatures occurred in your body? – What did you learn about yourself and thermoregulation? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  140. 140. • Outside simulation: Some will become cold quickly, others will not. If you need to go inside, you will be allowed. – What physical, and behavioral adaptations to cold temperatures occurred in your body? – What did you learn about yourself and thermoregulation? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141. • Outside simulation: Some will become cold quickly, others will not. If you need to go inside, you will be allowed. – What physical, and behavioral adaptations to cold temperatures occurred in your body? – What did you learn about yourself and thermoregulation? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Warning! If you feel like you are getting too cold please let the teacher know so you can warm-up inside.
  142. 142. • Outside simulation: Some will become cold quickly, others will not. If you need to go inside, you will be allowed. – What physical, and behavioral adaptations to cold temperatures occurred in your body? – Behavioral Adaptations -Physical Adaptations – What did you learn about yourself and how you thermoregulate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143.  Hypothermia: A decrease in the core body temperature to a level at which normal muscular and brain functions are impaired. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. • Mild Hypothermia
  145. 145. • Mild Hypothermia – Core temperature 98.6 - 96 degrees F
  146. 146. • Mild Hypothermia – Core temperature 98.6 - 96 degrees F – Shivering - not under voluntary control.
  147. 147. • Mild Hypothermia – Core temperature 98.6 - 96 degrees F – Shivering - not under voluntary control. – Can't do complex motor functions (ice climbing or skiing) can still walk & talk.
  148. 148. • Which is not true of mild hypothermia? A.) Shivering - not under voluntary control. B.) You can still do complex motor functions. C.) Impaired Judgement. D.) You can still walk and talk.
  149. 149. • Which is not true of mild hypothermia? A.) Shivering - not under voluntary control. B.) You can still do complex motor functions. C.) Impaired Judgement. D.) You can still walk and talk.
  150. 150. • Which is not true of mild hypothermia? A.) Shivering - not under voluntary control. B.) You can’t do complex motor functions. C.) Impaired Judgement. D.) You can still walk and talk.
  151. 151. • Moderate Hypothermia – Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  152. 152. • Moderate Hypothermia – – Core temperature 95 - 93 degrees F Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  153. 153. • Moderate Hypothermia – – Core temperature 95 - 93 degrees F – Dazed consciousness. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154. • Moderate Hypothermia – – Core temperature 95 - 93 degrees F – Dazed consciousness. – Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in hands - Can't zip up parka, due to restricted peripheral blood flow. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155. • Moderate Hypothermia – – Core temperature 95 - 93 degrees F – Dazed consciousness. – Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in hands - Can't zip up parka, due to restricted peripheral blood flow. – Slurred speech. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Moderate Hypothermia – – Core temperature 95 - 93 degrees F – Dazed consciousness. – Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in hands - Can't zip up parka, due to restricted peripheral blood flow. – Slurred speech. – Violent shivering. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • Moderate Hypothermia – – Core temperature 95 - 93 degrees F – Dazed consciousness. – Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in hands - Can't zip up parka, due to restricted peripheral blood flow. – Slurred speech. – Violent shivering. – Irrational behavior - Person starts to take off clothing, unaware she/he is cold. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158. • Which is not true of moderate hypothermia? A.) Dazed consciousness. B.) Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in hands - can't zip up parka, due to restricted peripheral blood flow. C.) Slurred speech. D.) Mild shivering. E.) Irrational behavior - Person starts to take off clothing, unaware she/he is cold. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159. • Which is not true of moderate hypothermia? A.) Dazed consciousness. B.) Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in hands - can't zip up parka, due to restricted peripheral blood flow. C.) Slurred speech. D.) Mild shivering. E.) Irrational behavior - Person starts to take off clothing, unaware she/he is cold. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160. • Which is not true of moderate hypothermia? A.) Dazed consciousness. B.) Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in hands - can't zip up parka, due to restricted peripheral blood flow. C.) Slurred speech. D.) Violent shivering. E.) Irrational behavior - Person starts to take off clothing, unaware she/he is cold. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161. • Severe Hypothermia - core temperature 92 - 86 degrees and below (immediately life threatening) – Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses get longer until shivering finally ceases. – Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a fetal position to conserve heat. – Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the muscles. – Skin is pale. – Pupils dilate. – Pulse rate decreases. – At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation, shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing breathing rate and heart rate. – at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  162. 162. • Which is not true of severe hypothermia? A.) Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses get longer until shivering finally ceases. B.) Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a fetal position to conserve heat. C.) Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the muscles. D.) Skin is pale. E.) Pupils dilate. F.) Pulse rate increases. G,) At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation, shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing breathing rate and heart rate. H.) at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  163. 163. • Which is not true of severe hypothermia? A.) Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses get longer until shivering finally ceases. B.) Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a fetal position to conserve heat. C.) Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the muscles. D.) Skin is pale. E.) Pupils dilate. F.) Pulse rate increases. G,) At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation, shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing breathing rate and heart rate. H.) at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164. • Which is not true of severe hypothermia? A.) Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses get longer until shivering finally ceases. B.) Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a fetal position to conserve heat. C.) Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the muscles. D.) Skin is pale. E.) Pupils dilate. F.) Pulse rate decreases. G,) At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation, shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing breathing rate and heart rate. H.) at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  165. 165. • Conditions Leading to Hypothermia Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166. • Conditions Leading to Hypothermia – Cold temperatures + wind chills. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167. • Conditions Leading to Hypothermia – Cold temperatures + wind chills. – Improper clothing and equipment. – . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168. • Conditions Leading to Hypothermia – Cold temperatures + wind chills. – Improper clothing and equipment. – Wetness. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169. • Conditions Leading to Hypothermia – Cold temperatures + wind chills. – Improper clothing and equipment. – Wetness. – Fatigue, exhaustion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170. • Conditions Leading to Hypothermia – Cold temperatures + wind chills. – Improper clothing and equipment. – Wetness. – Fatigue, exhaustion. – Dehydration. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171. • Conditions Leading to Hypothermia – Cold temperatures + wind chills. – Improper clothing and equipment. – Wetness. – Fatigue, exhaustion. – Dehydration. – Poor food intake. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172. • Conditions Leading to Hypothermia – Cold temperatures + wind chills. – Improper clothing and equipment. – Wetness. – Fatigue, exhaustion. – Dehydration. – Poor food intake. – No knowledge of hypothermia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  173. 173. • Conditions Leading to Hypothermia – Cold temperatures + wind chills. – Improper clothing and equipment. – Wetness. – Fatigue, exhaustion. – Dehydration. – Poor food intake. – No knowledge of hypothermia. – Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  174. 174. • Which is not a condition leading to Hypothermia? A.) Cold temperatures + wind chills. B.) Improper clothing and equipment. C.) Wetness. D.) Fatigue, exhaustion. E.) Dehydration. F.) Good food intake. G.) No knowledge of hypothermia. H.) Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  175. 175. • Which is not a condition leading to Hypothermia? A.) Cold temperatures + wind chills. B.) Improper clothing and equipment. C.) Wetness. D.) Fatigue, exhaustion. E.) Dehydration. F.) Good food intake. G.) No knowledge of hypothermia. H.) Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  176. 176. • Which is not a condition leading to Hypothermia? A.) Cold temperatures + wind chills. B.) Improper clothing and equipment. C.) Wetness. D.) Fatigue, exhaustion. E.) Dehydration. F.) Poor food intake. G.) No knowledge of hypothermia. H.) Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  177. 177. • Which is not a condition leading to Hypothermia? A.) Warm temperatures + Sun light B.) Improper clothing and equipment C.) Wetness D.) Fatigue, exhaustion E.) Dehydration F.) Poor food intake G.) No knowledge of hypothermia H.) Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. • Which is not a condition leading to Hypothermia? A.) Warm temperatures + Sun light B.) Improper clothing and equipment C.) Wetness D.) Fatigue, exhaustion E.) Dehydration F.) Poor food intake G.) No knowledge of hypothermia H.) Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179. • Which is not a condition leading to Hypothermia? A.) Cold temperatures + Wind Chills B.) Improper clothing and equipment C.) Wetness D.) Fatigue, exhaustion E.) Dehydration F.) Poor food intake G.) No knowledge of hypothermia H.) Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180. • Which is not a condition leading to Hypothermia? A.) Cold temperatures + wind chills. B.) Improper clothing and equipment. C.) Wetness. D.) Fatigue, exhaustion. E.) Dehydration. F.) Poor food intake. G.) No knowledge of hypothermia. H.) Warm fluid intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181. • Which is not a condition leading to Hypothermia? A.) Cold temperatures + wind chills. B.) Improper clothing and equipment. C.) Wetness. D.) Fatigue, exhaustion. E.) Dehydration. F.) Poor food intake. G.) No knowledge of hypothermia. H.) Warm fluid intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. • Which is not a condition leading to Hypothermia? A.) Cold temperatures + wind chills. B.) Improper clothing and equipment. C.) Wetness. D.) Fatigue, exhaustion. E.) Dehydration. F.) Poor food intake. G.) No knowledge of hypothermia. H.) Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems leading to increased heat loss. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. • Please place the arrow where a human may become moderately hypothermic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • Please place the arrow where a human may become moderately hypothermic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • Answer! 94 Degrees Fahrenheit or 34.44 Degrees Celsius Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. • Place the yellow line where a humans core temperature should be at normal range. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. • Answer: 98.6 degrees F, • 37 degrees Celsius Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  188. 188. • Video Link! Ice Safety – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXEvPUWnSfo
  189. 189.  Hyperthermia: Having a body temperature that is too high, causes heart failure, among other problems and death. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190. • Heat Exhaustion. – What are some symptoms? Start Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191. • Heat Exhaustion. – Profuse sweating and high temperature. Working in sun and warm temperatures Start Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192. • Heat Exhaustion. – What are some symptoms? Next Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  193. 193. • Heat Exhaustion. – Headache, sweating stops, hot dry skin, feeling faint. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. • Heat Exhaustion. – How can you get it? Next Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • Heat Exhaustion. – Labor / hard work during high temperatures. – Also wearing excessive layers when it is warm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. • Heat exhaustion warning signs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197. • Heat exhaustion warning signs. – Abnormally high temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  198. 198. • Heat exhaustion warning signs. – Abnormally high temperature. – So hot you might collapse. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  199. 199. • Heat exhaustion warning signs. – Abnormally high temperature. – So hot you might collapse. – Appear pale. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  200. 200. • Heat exhaustion warning signs. – Abnormally high temperature. – So hot you might collapse. – Appear pale. – Sweating profusely. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  201. 201. • Which two are not heat exhaustion warning signs? A.) Abnormally high temperature. B.) So hot you might collapse. C.) Pale Appearance. D.) So dehydrated you can’t sweat. E.) Hyperactivity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  202. 202. • Which two are not heat exhaustion warning signs? A.) Abnormally high temperature. B.) So hot you might collapse. C.) Pale Appearance. D.) So dehydrated you can’t sweat. E.) Hyperactivity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  203. 203. • Which two are not heat exhaustion warning signs? A.) Abnormally high temperature. B.) So hot you might collapse. C.) Pale Appearance. D.) Profuse sweating E.) Extremely tired Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  204. 204. • Heat Exhaustion. – What should you do to prevent heat exhaustion? Next Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  205. 205. • Heat Exhaustion. – Drink lots of water, seek shade and cooler temperatures, don’t work when it is too hot! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. • Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke, aka hyperthermia. – Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . – Know the weather and heat index. – Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids. – Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. – Take rest breaks (rehydrate) – Place cool damp towels on forehead. – Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. • Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke, aka hyperthermia. – Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . – Know the weather and heat index. – Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids. – Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. – Take rest breaks (rehydrate) – Place cool damp towels on forehead. – Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  208. 208. • Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke, aka hyperthermia. – Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . – Know the weather and heat index. – Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids. – Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. – Take rest breaks (rehydrate) – Place cool damp towels on forehead. – Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. • Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke, aka hyperthermia. – Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . – Know the weather and heat index. – Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids. – Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. – Take rest breaks (rehydrate) – Place cool damp towels on forehead. – Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  210. 210. • Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke, aka hyperthermia. – Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . – Know the weather and heat index. – Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids. – Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. – Take rest breaks (rehydrate) – Place cool damp towels on forehead. – Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  211. 211. • Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke, aka hyperthermia. – Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . – Know the weather and heat index. – Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids. – Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. – Take rest breaks (rehydrate) – Place cool damp towels on forehead. – Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  212. 212. • Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke, aka hyperthermia. – Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . – Know the weather and heat index. – Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids. – Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. – Take rest breaks (rehydrate) – Place cool damp towels on forehead. – Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  213. 213. • Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke, aka hyperthermia. – Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . – Know the weather and heat index. – Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids. – Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. – Take rest breaks (rehydrate) – Place cool damp towels on forehead. – Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  214. 214. “Ugggh,” “Not again!”
  215. 215. • Which tip is bogus from the list below to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. A.) Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . B.) Know the weather and heat index. C.) Limit your water and rehydrating fluids. D.) Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. E.) Take rest breaks (rehydrate) F.) Place cool damp towels on forehead. G.) Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  216. 216. • Which tip is bogus from the list below to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. A.) Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . B.) Know the weather and heat index. C.) Limit your water and rehydrating fluids. D.) Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. E.) Take rest breaks (rehydrate) F.) Place cool damp towels on forehead. G.) Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  217. 217. • Which tip is bogus from the list below to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. A.) Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . B.) Know the weather and heat index. C.) Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids. D.) Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. E.) Take rest breaks (rehydrate) F.) Place cool damp towels on forehead. G.) Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  218. 218. • Which tip is bogus from the list below to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. A) Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . B) Know the weather and heat index. C) Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids. D) Avoid shade, and wear tight fitting clothing. E) Take rest breaks (rehydrate) F) Place cool damp towels on forehead. G) Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  219. 219. • Which tip is bogus from the list below to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. A) Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . B) Know the weather and heat index. C) Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids. D) Avoid shade, and wear tight fitting clothing. E) Take rest breaks (rehydrate) F) Place cool damp towels on forehead. G) Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  220. 220. • Which tip is bogus from the list below to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. A) Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . B) Know the weather and heat index. C) Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids. D) Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. E) Take rest breaks (rehydrate) F) Place cool damp towels on forehead. G) Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  221. 221. • Which tip is bogus from the list below to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. A) Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . B) Know the weather and heat index. C) Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids. D) Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. E) Avoid rest breaks. F) Place cool damp towels on forehead. G) Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. • Which tip is bogus from the list below to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. A) Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . B) Know the weather and heat index. C) Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids. D) Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. E) Avoid rest breaks. F) Place cool damp towels on forehead. G) Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  223. 223. • Which tip is bogus from the list below to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. A) Be smart about when you are going to be active, high noon on the hottest day . B) Know the weather and heat index. C) Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids. D) Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing. E) Take plenty of rest breaks (rehydrate) F) Place cool damp towels on forehead. G) Don’t drink alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  224. 224. • Video Link Heat Stroke / Exhaustion – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AACwAleD kN0
  225. 225. • Seek medical attention if needed. To cool down if you have heat exhaustion… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  226. 226. • Seek medical attention if needed. To cool down if you have heat exhaustion… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  227. 227. • Seek medical attention if needed. To cool down if you have heat exhaustion… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  228. 228. • Seek medical attention if needed. To cool down if you have heat exhaustion… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  229. 229. • Seek medical attention if needed. To cool down if you have heat exhaustion… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  230. 230. • Seek medical attention if needed. To cool down if you have heat exhaustion… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  231. 231. • Seek medical attention if needed. To cool down if you have heat exhaustion… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  232. 232. • Seek medical attention if needed. To cool down if you have heat exhaustion… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  233. 233. • Never leave a baby or pet in a car with the windows up! Not even for a minute! – Even with the windows down, it is not a safe practice. – Hundreds die every year.
  234. 234. • Never leave a baby or pet in a car with the windows up! Not even for a minute! – Even with the windows down, it’s not a safe practice. – Hundreds die every year.
  235. 235. • Never leave a baby or pet in a car with the windows up! Not even for a minute! – Even with the windows down, it’s not a safe practice. – Hundreds of pets die every year.
  236. 236. • Put the purple arrow where a human may become moderately hyperthermic.
  237. 237. • Answer! Hyperthermia occurs when your body temp is 37.5–38.3 °C (100–101 °F)
  238. 238. • Answer! Life threatening occurs when your body temp is 40 °C (104 °F)
  239. 239. • Again, organisms have a range of tolerance, for humans, your body temperature should be close to 98.6 degrees F, or 37 degrees Celsius. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  240. 240. • Thermoregulation reading. (Optional) – http://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article%20folder/th ermoregulation.html
  241. 241. • You can now complete this question on page 3 of your bundled homework.
  242. 242.  Area of focus within temperature: The warm and cold bloodedness of organisms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  243. 243. • Note – There is still some debate among scientist to the terms warm and cold blooded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  244. 244. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  245. 245. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  246. 246. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  247. 247. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  248. 248. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  249. 249. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  250. 250. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  251. 251. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  252. 252. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  253. 253. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  254. 254. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  255. 255. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  256. 256. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  257. 257. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  258. 258. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  259. 259. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  260. 260. • Which from the pictures below has general warm-bloodedness? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  261. 261. • Which from the pictures below has general cold-bloodedness? Ectothermy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  262. 262. • Which from the pictures below has general cold-bloodedness? Ectothermy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  263. 263. • Which from the pictures below has general cold-bloodedness? Endothermy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  264. 264. Warm Bloodedness
  265. 265. Warm Bloodedness C O L D
  266. 266. • Which one is labeled incorrectly? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  267. 267. • Which one is labeled incorrectly? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  268. 268. • Which one is labeled incorrectly? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  269. 269.  Warm-bloodedness (endothermy): Maintaining a warm body temperature independent of environmental conditions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  270. 270. • Which has warm bloodedness, and which is generally cold blooded? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  271. 271. • Which has warm bloodedness, and which is generally cold blooded? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  272. 272. • Which has warm bloodedness, and which is generally cold blooded? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  273. 273. • Which has warm bloodedness, and which is generally cold blooded? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  274. 274. • Which has warm bloodedness, and which is generally cold blooded? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  275. 275.  Advantage: Warm-blooded animals can remain active in cold environments. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  276. 276.  Disadvantage: Is that warm-blooded bodies provide a nice warm environment for viruses, bacteria, and parasites to live in.
  277. 277.  Disadvantage: Is that warm-blooded bodies provide a nice warm environment for viruses, bacteria, and parasites to live in.
  278. 278. • Warm-blooded organisms need to eat often to maintain a higher body temperature. – Eat up or freeze to death. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  279. 279.  Cold-Bloodedness: When organisms can’t regulate their internal temperature.  When it’s cold they can’t move, when it’s warm they’re more active. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  280. 280.  Cold-Bloodedness: When organisms can’t regulate their internal temperature.  When it’s cold they can’t move, when it’s warm they’re more active. (Ectothermy) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  281. 281. • Activity! The Amazing Cold-Blooded Race: – The opposite of a race, last person to finish wins. (Chariots of Fire-MP3) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY3XiM7oGj0 – One person from each table group. – You must be moving forward and can’t stop. – The most animated and slowest racer wins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  282. 282. • Turtles and other reptiles need to seek warm temperatures when it’s cold to raise their metabolism so they can become active. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  283. 283. • So where do all of the reptiles, fish, and amphibians go in the winter? – What do they do? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  284. 284. • Most reptiles and amphibians find a nice place to wait out the colder temperatures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  285. 285. • Some snakes such as garter snakes den together during the winter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  286. 286. • The Narcisse Snake Pits: – Located in Manitoba, Canada. – The dens are the winter home of tens of thousands of Red-sided Garter Snakes. – Largest concentration in the world of this particular type of snake. – Their winter dens are subterranean caverns. – In the spring, they come up from their dens to the snake pits, where they engage in mating rituals. Then they disperse into the nearby marshes for the summer.
  287. 287. • Video! The Narcisse Snake Dens • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSO4oo NN_MY&feature=related
  288. 288.  Hibernation / torpor: A state of inactivity and metabolic depression in animals.  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  289. 289.  Hibernation / torpor: A state of inactivity and metabolic depression in animals.  (Slow breathing, lower body temp) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  290. 290. • They still breathe and are alive, but the heart may only pump a few times an hour. • They can’t just jump up out of it as they need to warm up first. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  291. 291. • They still breathe and are alive, but the heart may only pump a few times an hour. • They can’t just jump up out of it as they need to warm up first. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  292. 292. • They still breathe and are alive, but the heart may only pump a few times an hour. • They can’t just jump up out of it as they need to warm up first. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  293. 293. • They still breathe and are alive, but the heart may only pump a few times an hour. • They can’t just jump up out of it as they need to warm up first. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  294. 294. • They still breathe and are alive, but the heart may only pump a few times an hour. • They can’t just jump up out of it as they need to warm up first. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  295. 295.  Advantage: Cold-blooded animals require much less energy to survive than warm- blooded animals do. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  296. 296. • After this python consumes this deer, it won’t have to eat for many months. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  297. 297. • Video Link! Snake vs. Mammal and energy expenditure. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNHx5GI1 KQE&NR=1&feature=fvwp
  298. 298. • Video! Snake eating an egg. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLk4rsCNFFU – Snakes can detach their lower jaw, and the upper jaw is not fused to their braincase, both working together can allow a snake to eat large prey items. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  299. 299. • Another advantage is that cold blooded organisms aren’t affected by as many pathogens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  300. 300. • Another advantage is that cold blooded organisms aren’t affected by as many pathogens. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  301. 301.  Disadvantage: They can’t be active in cold places during the winter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  302. 302. • You can now complete page 2 of your bundled homework package.
  303. 303. • You can now complete page 2 of your bundled homework package.
  304. 304. • You can now complete page 2 of your bundled homework package.
  305. 305. • You can now complete page 2 of your bundled homework package.
  306. 306. • You can now complete page 2 of your bundled homework package.
  307. 307. • Video Link (Optional) Thermoregulation. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSUCdLkI474
  308. 308. • Try and guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. Please raise your hand when you think you know. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  309. 309. Rabbit with big ears / thermal windows for thermoregulation
  310. 310. Rabbit with big ears / thermal windows for thermoregulation
  311. 311. • Try and guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. Please raise your hand when you think you know. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  312. 312. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  313. 313. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  314. 314. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  315. 315. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  316. 316. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  317. 317. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  318. 318. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  319. 319. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  320. 320. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  321. 321. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  322. 322. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  323. 323. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  324. 324. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Get me out of here before I get heat stroke.”
  325. 325. • Try and guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. Please raise your hand when you think you know. – You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  326. 326. • You can now complete page 2 of your bundled homework package.
  327. 327. • More Units Available at… Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and The Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit. Copyright © 2011 www.sciencepowerpoint.com LLC.
  328. 328. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tst Please visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet
  329. 329. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p=1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
  330. 330. • This PowerPoint is one small part of my Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit. This unit includes… • A 4 Part 2,400+ Slide PowerPoint • 14 page bundled homework packaged that chronologically follows PowerPoint, + modified version • 16 pages of unit notes with visuals • 2 PowerPoint review games • Rubrics, Answer Keys, games, and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_F actors_Unit.html
  331. 331. Areas of Focus within The Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit Abiotic Factors, Biotic Factors, The Big 7 Abiotic Factors, Organisms Range of Tolerance, Light, How light affects Organisms, Photosynthesis, Factors in the Environment that Affect the Amount of Light, How Organisms Movements are affected by light, Bioluminescence, How temperature affects organisms, Thermoregulation, Physiological Regulation, Behavioral Regulation, Adaptation, Hypothermia, Hyperthermia, Warm-Bloodedness (endothermy), Cold-Bloodedness, Hibernation / Torpor, Advantages of Warm-Bloodedness, Disadvantages of Warm-Bloodedness, Advantages of Cold-Bloodedness, Disadvantages of Cold- Bloodedness, Water, Water Requirements and Plants, Adaptations of Plants and Water, Adaptations of Animals and Water, Wind, Positives and Negatives of Wind to Organisms, How animals use Wind, How Plants use Wind, Wind Dispersal, Water Dispersal, McArthur- Wilson Island Biogeography Theory, Animal Seed Dispersal, Fire Ecology, Fire Dependence, Biogeochemical Cycles, Water Cycle, Carbon Cycle, Photosynthesis, Cellular Respiration, Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Balance, Nitrogen Cycle, Phosphorus Cycle, Importance of Phosphorus, Nutrients, Nutrient Pollution and Aquatic Systems, Eutrophification. Full Unit can be found at… http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  332. 332. • More Units Available at… Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and The Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit. Copyright © 2011 www.sciencepowerpoint.com LLC.
  333. 333. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  334. 334. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  335. 335. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
  336. 336. • Thank you for your time and interest in this curriculum tour. Please visit the welcome / guide on how a unit works and link to the many unit previews to see the PowerPoint slideshows, bundled homework, review games, unit notes, and much more. Thank you for your interest and please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Best wishes. • Sincerely, • Ryan Murphy M.Ed • ryemurf@gmail.com

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