Digestive System Lesson PowerPoint, Digestion, Stomach, Intestine, Anatomy Lesso

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This is the digestive system lesson PowerPoint that follows my 13 Part 8,500 slide PowerPoint from my Human Body Systems Unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This lesson PowerPoint covers the human …

This is the digestive system lesson PowerPoint that follows my 13 Part 8,500 slide PowerPoint from my Human Body Systems Unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This lesson PowerPoint covers the human digestive system. A bundled homework package, lesson notes, and much more are included.

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  • 1. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. orm ollows unctionCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 2. Human Body Unit Part VI/XIII The Digestive System Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 3. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 4. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Kidneys Ureters Urinary Bladder Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 5. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 6. • Keep an eye out for “The-Owl” and raise your hand as soon as you see him. – He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 7. “Hoot, Hoot” “Good Luck!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 8.  New Area of Focus: The Digestive System Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 9. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 10. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 11. • What did you have for breakfast today? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 12. • Humans are chemical factories, we need raw materials to produce new cells, repair damaged parts, and produce energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 13. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 14. • High quality energy in Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 15. • High quality energy in – heat released – Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 16. • High quality energy in – heat released – lower quality energy out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 17. • High quality energy in – heat released – lower quality energy out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 18. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 19. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 20.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food.
  • 21.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 22.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 23.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 24.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 25.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 26.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 27.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 28.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 29.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 30.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 31.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 32.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. “I had a well balanced lunch.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 33.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 34.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. “Uggghhh.” “Rough Lunch.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 35.  Nutrients: The usable portions of food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 36. • Nutrients include Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 37. • Nutrients include Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 38. • Nutrients include – Proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 39. • Nutrients include – Proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 40. • Nutrients include – Proteins – Carbohydrates Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 41. • Nutrients include – Proteins – Carbohydrates Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 42. • Nutrients include – Proteins – Carbohydrates – Fats Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 43. • Nutrients include – Proteins – Carbohydrates – Fats Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 44. • Nutrients include – Proteins – Carbohydrates – Fats – Vitamins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 45. • Nutrients include – Proteins – Carbohydrates – Fats – Vitamins
  • 46. • Nutrients include – Proteins – Carbohydrates – Fats – Vitamins – Minerals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 47. • Nutrients include – Proteins – Carbohydrates – Fats – Vitamins – Minerals
  • 48. • Nutrients include – Proteins – Carbohydrates – Fats – Vitamins – Minerals – Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 49. • Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 50. • Carbohydrates: Energy molecule and contains fiber. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 51. • Fats: Energy source. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 52. • Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 53. • Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 54. • Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 55. • Which of the following is incorrect? A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Prevents nutrient overloading and regulates calcium C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 56. • Which of the following is incorrect? A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Prevents nutrient overloading and regulates calcium C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 57. • Which of the following is incorrect? A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Prevents nutrient overloading and regulates calcium. C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 58. • Which of the following is incorrect? A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Prevents nutrient overloading and regulates calcium. C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 59. • Which of the following is incorrect? A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Prevents nutrient overloading and regulates calcium. C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 60. • Which of the following is incorrect? A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Prevents nutrient overloading and regulates calcium. C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues. F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 61. • Which of the following is incorrect? A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Prevents nutrient overloading and regulates calcium. C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues. F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 62. • Which of the following is incorrect? Answer is… A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Prevents nutrient overloading and regulates calcium. C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues. F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 63. • Which of the following is incorrect? Answer is… A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Prevents nutrient overloading and regulates calcium. C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues. F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 64. • Which of the following is incorrect? Answer is… A.) Protein: Growth, Repair, Reproduction of Cells (structure of your body), produces enzymes, hormones, antibodies. B.) Carbohydrates: Energy molecule and contains fiber. C.) Fats: Energy source. D.) Vitamins: Prevents diseases, regulates body processes, and needed for chemical reactions. E.) Minerals: Needed for bones and teeth, blood and other tissues. F.) Water: To dissolve substances in blood, tissue fluid, biochemical reactions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 65.  Calorie: Amount of energy that can be obtained from nutrients. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 66. • You’ve just completely bonked due to a lack of energy. – Which of the items below will give you a quick burst of energy, and which will give you longer lasting energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 67. • You’ve just completely bonked due to a lack of energy. – Which of the items below will give you a quick burst of energy, and which will give you longer lasting energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 68. • You’ve just completely bonked due to a lack of energy. – Which of the items below will give you a quick burst of energy, and which will give you longer lasting energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 69. • You’ve just completely bonked due to a lack of energy. – Which of the items below will give you a quick burst of energy, and which will give you longer lasting energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 70. • You’ve just completely bonked due to a lack of energy. – Which of the items below will give you a quick burst of energy, and which will give you longer lasting energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 71.  Digestion: The process of breaking food down into nutrients. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 72. • Let’s discuss the mouth and salvia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 73. • Saliva helps to moisten your food and contains a chemical to begin the process of digestion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 74.  Ptyalin (ti´ah-lin): Chemical (Enzyme) in saliva that breaks starches into sugars. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 75.  Ptyalin (ti´ah-lin): Chemical (Enzyme) in saliva that breaks starches into sugars. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about saliva at… http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-is-saliva
  • 76.  Chemical Digestion: Process of converting food into chemical substances that can be absorbed and used. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 77. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 78. • Activity! Starting off the digestion process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 79. • Activity! Starting off the digestion process. • Students with food allergies should not participate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 80. • Activity! Starting off the digestion process. • Students with food allergies should not participate. – Teacher to pass everyone a piece of bread. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 81. • Activity! Starting off the digestion process. • Students with food allergies should not participate. – Teacher to pass everyone a piece of bread. – Students place bread in mouth (Record taste immediately in journal) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 82. • Activity! Starting off the digestion process. • Students with food allergies should not participate. – Teacher to pass everyone a piece of bread. – Students place bread in mouth (Record taste immediately in journal) – Students allow salvia to moisten bread in mouth and then begin chewing. (Record taste in journal after chewing) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 83. • What happened? • How did the taste change? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 84. • Answer: Bread is a complex carbohydrate (starch). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 85. • Answer: Bread is a complex carbohydrate (starch). The ptyalin in your saliva along with your chewing broke the large sugar molecules into smaller (more sweet) sugar molecules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 86. • Answer: Bread is a complex carbohydrate (starch). The ptyalin in your saliva along with your chewing broke the large sugar molecules into smaller (more sweet) sugar molecules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 87. • Answer: Bread is a complex carbohydrate (starch). The ptyalin in your saliva along with your chewing broke the large sugar molecules into smaller (more sweet) sugar molecules. Glucose Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 88. • Taste buds: The sensory organs that are found on your tongue. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 89. • Taste buds: The sensory organs that are found on your tongue. Taste buds are part of the nervous system but will be covered quickly now. They will be addressed again later. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 90. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 91. • Activity! Sour Patch Kid. – Place Sour Patch Kid in the four place of your tongue. Which is the most sour? 1 1 2 3 4 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 92. • Activity! Sour Patch Kid. – Place Sour Patch Kid in the four place of your tongue. Which is the most sour? 1 1 2 3 4 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 93. • Activity! Sour Patch Kid. – Place Sour Patch Kid in the four place of your tongue. Which is the most sour? 1 1 2 4 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 94. • Activity! Sour Patch Kid. – Place Sour Patch Kid in the four place of your tongue. Which is the most sour? 1 1 2 4 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 95. • Activity! Sour Patch Kid. – Place Sour Patch Kid in the four place of your tongue. Which is the most sour? 1 1 4 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 96. • Activity! Sour Patch Kid. – Place Sour Patch Kid in the four place of your tongue. Which is the most sour? 1 1 4 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 97. • Activity! Sour Patch Kid. – Place Sour Patch Kid in the four place of your tongue. Which is the most sour? 1 1 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 98. • Activity! Sour Patch Kid. – Place Sour Patch Kid in the four place of your tongue. Which is the most sour? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 99. • Activity! Salt Water. – Mix up a solution of table salt and warm water. Have students dip a popsicle stick into the solution and then test to see if the tip the tongue picks up the salty taste. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 100. • Activity! Unsweetened Cocoa Powder – Have students wet a new popsicle stick into water and then dip it into a container of unsweetened cocoa powder. Then test to see if the back of the tongue picks up the bitter taste. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 101. • Besides the chemical enzymes, what else did you use to break down the piece of bread? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 102.  Mechanical Digestion: Physically breaking down the food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 103.  Mechanical Digestion: Physically breaking down the food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 104.  Mechanical Digestion: Physically breaking down the food. orm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 105.  Mechanical Digestion: Physically breaking down the food. orm ollows Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 106.  Mechanical Digestion: Physically breaking down the food. orm ollows unction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 107.  Mechanical Digestion: Physically breaking down the food. orm ollows unction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 108. • Dentition – - – - – - – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 109. • Dentition – - – - – - – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Covered here as it will relate to how food is mechanically broken down in the mouth
  • 110. • Incisors = For cutting. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 111. • Activity! Practice snipping a carrot much like a rabbit with your incisors. – Grind the carrot with your back teeth / molars.
  • 112. • A beaver must constantly wear down its incisors or they will grow up into it’s brain causing death. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 113. • Which teeth are the incisors in this human? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 114. • Answer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 115. • Canines: For stabbing and killing, tearing and piercing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 116. • Canines: For stabbing and killing, tearing and piercing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Volunteer Needed
  • 117. • Canines: For stabbing and killing, tearing and piercing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 118. • Canines: For stabbing and killing, tearing and piercing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 119. • In some cases, canines have evolved so they can be used for many purposes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 120. • Walrus tusks are used as a mating symbol to show dominance,
  • 121. • Walrus tusks are used as a mating symbol to show dominance,
  • 122. • Walrus tusks are used as a mating symbol to show dominance, aid in forming and maintaining holes in the ice,
  • 123. • Walrus tusks are used as a mating symbol to show dominance, aid in forming and maintaining holes in the ice,
  • 124. • Walrus tusks are used as a mating symbol to show dominance, aid in forming and maintaining holes in the ice, and to climb out of the water and on to the ice.
  • 125. • Walrus tusks are used as a mating symbol to show dominance, aid in forming and maintaining holes in the ice, and to climb out of the water and on to the ice.
  • 126. • Carnivores sometimes have a large sagittal crest for muscle attachment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 127. • Carnivores sometimes have a large sagittal crest for muscle attachment. – Creates awesome crushing power. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 128. • Carnivores sometimes have a large sagittal crest for muscle attachment. – Creates awesome crushing power. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 129. • Zygomatic arch also allows muscles to attach and provides strength to bite. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 130. • Where are the canines in this human? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 131. • Answer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 132. • Which cast member below has the largest canines? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 133. • Answer! Count von Count Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 134. “Humans have four canines.” “Count them with me.”
  • 135. 1
  • 136. 1 2
  • 137. 1 2 3
  • 138. 1 2 3 4
  • 139. “That was fun.” “Let’s do it again.” “Even louder this time.”
  • 140. “Humans have four canines.” “Count them with me.”
  • 141. 1
  • 142. 1 2
  • 143. 1 2 3
  • 144. 1 2 3 4
  • 145. “Very Good!” “Now get back to work.”
  • 146. • Premolars: To crush and grind food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 147. • Activity! Gum in school just this once. – Chew a couple pieces of gum and make a large wad (Don’t choke!). Make an imprint with your premolars and canines. – Make a quick sketch in your journal and label each tooth.
  • 148. • Molars: Larger, crushing and grinding food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 149. • Herbivore molars are designed to grind and cut difficult plant material.
  • 150. • Wisdom teeth, Large Molars for crushing. Left over from when our primate ancestors ate a plant diet of tough vegetation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 151. • Diastema: A large gap between adjacent teeth, normally between the incisors and chewing teeth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 152. • Activity! Please work with your table group to match the colored teeth with their correct name. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 153. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 154. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 155. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 156. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 157. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 158. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 159. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 160. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 161. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 162. Is it a herbivore, carnivore or omnivore? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 163. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 164. • Activity! (Optional) Make your own tooth impression in clay or with chewing gum. – Please label your impression correctly on top of a piece of paper. – Incisors, Canines, Premolars, Molars. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 165. • The Digestive System uses a combination of mechanical and chemical means to break down food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 166. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 167. Learn more about mechanical and chemical digestion at… http://www.smartlivingnetwork.com/digestive/b/mechanical-and- chemical-digestion/
  • 168. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 169. • Activity! Eating an Apple. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 170. • Activity! Eating an Apple. – Draw a before picture of the apple, and your best guess of what the apple looks like after 35 number of chews to one swallow per bite. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 171. • Activity! Eating an Apple. – Draw a before picture of the apple, and your best guess of what the apple looks like after 35 number of chews to one swallow per bite. – Open your mouth after 35 chews and have neighbor draw apple. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 172. • Activity! Eating an Apple. – Draw a before picture of the apple, and your best guess of what the apple looks like after 35 number of chews to one swallow per bite. – Open your mouth after 35 chews and have neighbor draw apple. – Everyone eat the apple. Was 35 chews per bite too much or too little? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 173. • Chewing your food is an important part of digestion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 174. • Chewing your food is an important part of digestion. – Your stomach has no teeth. – Chewing allows the chemical digestion process to act on your food more easily. – Relax and enjoy, take your time, chew often. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 175. • Chewing your food is an important part of digestion. – Your stomach has no teeth. – Chewing allows the chemical digestion process to act on your food more easily. – Relax and enjoy, take your time, chew often. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 176. • Chewing your food is an important part of digestion. – Your stomach has no teeth – Chewing allows the chemical digestion process to act on your food more easily. – Relax and enjoy, take your time, chew often. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 177. • Activity! (Optional) Yummy Snack! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 178. • Activity! (Optional) Yummy Snack! – Draw a (before) and then (after) sketch upon completion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 179. • Activity! (Optional) Yummy Snack! – Draw a (before) and then (after) sketch upon completion. – Each student receives a few graham crackers, slices of banana, and clear plastic sandwich bag. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 180. • Activity! (Optional) Yummy Snack! – Draw a (before) and then (after) sketch upon completion. – Each student receives a few graham crackers, slices of banana, and clear plastic sandwich bag. – Teacher sprays inside of each bag with clean water from squirt bottle. (Saliva) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 181. • Activity! (Optional) Yummy Snack! – Draw a (before) and then (after) sketch upon completion. – Each student receives a few graham crackers, slices of banana, and clear plastic sandwich bag. – Teacher sprays inside of each bag with clean water from squirt bottle. (Saliva) – Students mix bag with hands (simulates chewing). Draw end product. –Scoop out and enjoy! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 182. • Activity Sheet! Creating your anatomy resource book. GI Tract / Digestive System – Please label all of the following. Use… – http://www.getbodysmart.com/ap2/systems/tutori al.html Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 183.  Pharynx: Part of the throat situated immediately behind the mouth and nasal cavity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 184. • What is this?
  • 185. • When you swallow (reflex), your muscles (tongue) move food into your throat and cause your epiglottis to close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 186. • When you swallow (reflex), your muscles (tongue) move food into your throat and cause your epiglottis to close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 187. • When you swallow (reflex), your muscles (tongue) move food into your throat and cause your epiglottis to close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 188. • When you swallow (reflex), your muscles (tongue) move food into your throat and cause your epiglottis to close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 189. • When you swallow (reflex), your muscles (tongue) move food into your throat and cause your epiglottis to close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 190. • When you swallow (reflex), your muscles (tongue) move food into your throat and cause your epiglottis to close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 191. • When you swallow (reflex), your muscles (tongue) move food into your throat and cause your epiglottis to close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The three phases of swallowing… Learn more at… http://stroke.about.com/od/caregiverresources/qt/swallowphases.htm
  • 192.  Esophagus: The tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach. (Smooth Muscle) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 193. • The esophagus is covered with a slimy mucous that aids movement. – (12 seconds to travel to stomach) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 194. • The esophagus is covered with a slimy mucous that aids movement. – (12 seconds to travel to stomach) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 195.  Peristalsis: Waves of rhythmic muscular contractions that push / move food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 196.  Peristalsis: Waves of rhythmic muscular contractions that push / move food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 197. • Optional Activity! Teacher or volunteer student swallows some food upside down. – Peristalsis can move food against gravity. – Please make item something that won’t cause a choking hazard. (chew prior) – Teacher or volunteer can lay over edge of table or handstand.
  • 198. • Video! Peristalsis in the antrum (Lower part of stomach). – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o18UycWR saA Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 199. • Activity! Going Golfing – Class needs to move 5 golf ball through the digestive track using peristalsis. Eyes Closed? – Students form line one across from another. – Wet hands and use dish soap for mucous. - You can only squeeze hands. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 200. • Optional activity to peristalsis. – Teacher to demonstrate moving a large plastic egg or Whiffle Ball (bolus) through a pantyhose with foot cut off. • Note the action of peristalsis instead of gravity.
  • 201. • Video! Choking and the Heimlich Maneuver – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEIiEAn7b-U
  • 202.  Stomach: A saclike part of the alimentary canal in which food is stored. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 203.  Stomach: A saclike part of the alimentary canal in which food is stored. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 204.  Stomach: A saclike part of the alimentary canal in which food is stored. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 205. • Cells in the stomach wall release a chemical gastric juice (Pepsin – enzyme) and thick slippery mucous to protect stomach. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 206. • Cells in the stomach wall release a chemical gastric juice (Pepsin – enzyme) and thick slippery mucous to protect stomach. – Pepsin contains hydrochloric acid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 207. • The stomach churns the food (mechanical) while the gastric juices break down the food chemically. (Smooth Muscle) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 208. • Heartburn / upset stomach is that acid making its way up the esophagus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 209. • Heartburn / upset stomach is that acid making its way up the esophagus. – Antacid tablets help to neutralize the acid with a base. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 210. • Heartburn / upset stomach is that acid making its way up the esophagus. – Antacid tablets help to neutralize the acid with a base. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 211. • Heartburn / upset stomach is that acid making its way up the esophagus. – Antacid tablets help to neutralize the acid with a base. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Acid
  • 212. • Heartburn / upset stomach is that acid making its way up the esophagus. – Antacid tablets help to neutralize the acid with a base. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Acid Base
  • 213. • Heartburn / upset stomach is that acid making its way up the esophagus. – Antacid tablets help to neutralize the acid with a base. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Acid Base Gastric Juices
  • 214. • Follow-up to Activity for digestive system! – Place small piece of chicken meat and bone into a jar with vinegar. – Take a similar size of meat and cut with a knife into many pieces and place in another jaw (simulated chewing) – Add vinegar and cap jar and set aside until you reach the digestion system / digestive juices. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 215. • How is the piece of chicken looking? – The meat should be broken down. The vinegar is acidic (pH of 2.4-3.4). – The pH of your stomach is about 1 (Acidic) HCL – Your small intestine is alkaline (pH 7.1) which is better for the digestive enzymes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 216. • Surface Area and Digestion? – Did the piece of meat that was cut up into several smaller pieces dissolve faster than the meat that was not? – Chewing helps to digest your food as the chemicals in your stomach and intestine and work on more of the food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 217. • Surface Area and Digestion? – Did the piece of meat that was cut up into several smaller pieces dissolve faster than the meat that was not? – Chewing helps to digest your food as the chemicals in your stomach and intestine and work on more of the food. ChewedNot chewed Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 218. • What does this tell us about our food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 219. • What does this tell us about our food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 220. • Teacher Demonstration! • Test the pH of vinegar with litmus paper. – See how an antacid neutralizes acid. Place a spoonful of Baking Soda (base) into the vinegar (acid). Note reaction. – Measure pH of baking soda and vinegar product. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 221. • Teacher Demonstration! • Test the pH of vinegar with litmus paper. – See how an antacid neutralizes acid. Place a spoonful of Baking Soda (base) into the vinegar (acid). Note reaction. – Measure pH of baking soda and vinegar product. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 222. • The Pyloric valve is a strong ring of smooth muscle that lets food pass from the stomach to the duodenum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 223. • How long does gum stay in your stomach if you swallow it? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 224. • How long does gum stay in your stomach if you swallow it? – A.) Your entire life? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 225. • How long does gum stay in your stomach if you swallow it? – A.) Your entire life? – B.) 7 years Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 226. • How long does gum stay in your stomach if you swallow it? – A.) Your entire life? – B.) 7 years – C.) 7 months Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 227. • How long does gum stay in your stomach if you swallow it? – A.) Your entire life? – B.) 7 years – C.) 7 months – D.) A few hours Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 228. • How long does gum stay in your stomach if you swallow it? – A.) Your entire life? – B.) 7 years – C.) 7 months – D.) A few hours – E.) It digests immediately Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 229. • How long does gum stay in your stomach if you swallow it? – A.) Your entire life? – B.) 7 years – C.) 7 months – D.) A few hours – E.) It digests immediately Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 230. • How long does gum stay in your stomach if you swallow it? – A.) Your entire life? – B.) 7 years – C.) 7 months – D.) A few hours – E.) It digests immediately Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 231. – Gum, like most materials, passes through your stomach and into your intestine. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 232. – Gum, like most materials, passes through your stomach and into your intestine. Some parts of the gum are digested (sugars) while the rest comes out the other end (resins). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 233. – Gum, like most materials, passes through your stomach and into your intestine. Some parts of the gum are digested (sugars) while the rest comes out the other end (resins). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 234. • From the stomach to the anus is known as the Gastrointestinal Tract or GI Tract. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 235. • From the stomach to the anus is known as the Gastrointestinal Tract or GI Tract. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 236. • Activity! Step by step drawing of the Digestive System.
  • 237. “Can we label some parts already?”
  • 238. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 239. • Activity! The GI Tract is about 12 meters long (40 feet in male) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 240. • Activity! The GI Tract is about 12 meters long (40 feet in male) – Volunteer to wear baggy sweatshirt and needs to stuff 10 meters of garden hose, and two meters of wacky noodle into the sweatshirt from just below chest to just above waist. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 241. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 242. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 243. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 244. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. orm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 245. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. orm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 246. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. orm ollows Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 247. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. orm ollows Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 248. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. orm ollows unctionCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 249. • Note how the GI Tract coils around so that its incredible length can fit into an area so small. orm ollows unctionCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 250.  Duodenum: The beginning of the small intestine. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 251. • Duodenum: The beginning of the small intestine. – Distributes bile Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 252. • Duodenum: The beginning of the small intestine. – Distributes bile (produced by the liver and stored in the gall bladder), Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 253. • Duodenum: The beginning of the small intestine. – Distributes bile (produced by the liver and stored in the gall bladder), pancreatic acids (pancreas), Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 254. • Duodenum: The beginning of the small intestine. – Distributes bile (produced by the liver and stored in the gall bladder), pancreatic acids (pancreas), and other secretions to chemically breakdown food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 255. • Duodenum: The beginning of the small intestine. – Distributes bile (produced by the liver and stored in the gall bladder), pancreatic acids (pancreas), and other secretions to chemically breakdown food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 256. • Duodenum: The beginning of the small intestine. – Distributes bile (produced by the liver and stored in the gall bladder), pancreatic acids (pancreas), and other secretions to chemically breakdown food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Why not add all of the digestive enzymes here?
  • 257. • Duodenum: The beginning of the small intestine. – If the chemical enzymes were added at the end of the GI tract the food would not be broken down and absorption of nutrients would be difficult. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Why not add all of the digestive enzymes here?
  • 258.  Small Intestine: Major organ for food absorption. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 259.  Small Intestine: Major organ for food absorption. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 260.  Small Intestine: Major organ for food absorption. Very Long 15 ft / 4.5 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 261.  Small Intestine: Major organ for food absorption. Very Long 15 ft / 4.5 m Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 262.  Small Intestine: Major organ for food absorption. Very Long 15 ft / 4.5 m orm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 263.  Small Intestine: Major organ for food absorption. Very Long 15 ft / 4.5 m orm ollows Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 264.  Small Intestine: Major organ for food absorption. Very Long 15 ft / 4.5 m orm ollows unction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 265.  Small Intestine: Major organ for food absorption. Very Long 15 ft / 4.5 m orm ollows unction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 266.  Small Intestine: Major organ for food absorption. Very Long 15 ft / 4.5 m orm ollows unction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 267. • Activity! On next Slide – Digestion Tic-Tac-Toe. Three in a row to win! (Tally wins to decide) – Teacher on next slide to minimize out of slideshow. – Students are and go first. – Teacher is and goes second” – Both must read squares information out loud before placing letter (Try and read the top and left row as well). Teacher to fill square with color – You must get two wins to win it all! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 268. Digestive Juices Digestive Enzyme Works On Changes To Saliva Ptylain Starch Simple Sugars Gastric (Stomach) Pepsin Protein Peptides and Amino Acids Pancreatic Amylase Trypsin Lipase Starch Protein Fats Complex Sugars, simple Proteins, Fatty Acids, Glycerol Intestinal Lactase, Maltase, Sucrase, Lipase, Peptidase Complex Sugars, Simple Proteins, Fats Simple Sugars, Amino Acids, Fatty Acids, Glycerol Example of win Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 269. Digestive Juices Digestive Enzyme Works On Changes To Saliva Ptylain Starch Simple Sugars Gastric (Stomach) Pepsin Protein Peptides and Amino Acids Pancreatic Amylase Trypsin Lipase Starch Protein Fats Complex Sugars, simple Proteins, Fatty Acids, Glycerol Intestinal Lactase, Maltase, Sucrase, Lipase, Simple Sugars, Amino Acids, Fatty Acids, GlycerolCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Example – I choose Peptides and Amino Acids that are created when gastric juices in the stomach and enzymes such as pepsin break down proteins.
  • 270. Digestive Juices Digestive Enzyme Works On Changes To Saliva Ptylain Starch Simple Sugars Gastric (Stomach) Pepsin Protein Peptides and Amino Acids Pancreatic Amylase Trypsin Lipase Starch Protein Fats Complex Sugars, simple Proteins, Fatty Acids, Glycerol Intestinal Lactase, Maltase, Sucrase, Lipase, Peptidase Complex Sugars, Simple Proteins, Fats Simple Sugars, Amino Acids, Fatty Acids, Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 271. Digestive Juices Digestive Enzyme Works On Changes To Saliva Ptylain Starch Simple Sugars Gastric (Stomach) Pepsin Protein Peptides and Amino Acids Pancreatic Amylase Trypsin Lipase Starch Protein Fats Complex Sugars, simple Proteins, Fatty Acids, Glycerol Intestinal Lactase, Maltase, Sucrase, Lipase, Peptidase Complex Sugars, Simple Proteins, Fats Simple Sugars, Amino Acids, Fatty Acids, Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 272. Digestive Juices Digestive Enzyme Works On Changes To Saliva Ptylain Starch Simple Sugars Gastric (Stomach) Pepsin Protein Peptides and Amino Acids Pancreatic Amylase Trypsin Lipase Starch Protein Fats Complex Sugars, simple Proteins, Fatty Acids, Glycerol Intestinal Lactase, Maltase, Sucrase, Lipase, Peptidase Complex Sugars, Simple Proteins, Fats Simple Sugars, Amino Acids, Fatty Acids, Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 273.  Pancreas: Organ that aids in digestion by producing pancreatic juices that enter small intestine. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 274. • Pancreas: Organ that aids in digestion by producing pancreatic juices that enter small intestine. – Also aids in producing hormones. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 275. • Pancreas: Organ that aids in digestion by producing pancreatic juices that enter small intestine. – Also aids in producing hormones. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 276. • The Liver and Gall Bladder are organs that aid in the digestion process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 277. • The Liver and Gall Bladder are organs that aid in the digestion process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 278. • The Liver and Gall Bladder are organs that aid in the digestion process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 279.  Liver: Large, heavy, vital organ that produces bile that breaks down fats.  Also detoxifies chemicals  Synthesizes proteins  Stores Glycogen (energy)  Decomposes red blood cells  Hormone production Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 280. • Liver: Large, heavy, vital organ that produces bile that breaks down fats. – Also detoxifies chemicals – Synthesizes proteins – Stores Glycogen (energy) – Decomposes red blood cells – Hormone production Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 281. • Liver: Large, heavy, vital organ that produces bile that breaks down fats. – Also detoxifies chemicals – Synthesizes proteins – Stores Glycogen (energy) – Decomposes red blood cells – Hormone production Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 282. • Liver: Large, heavy, vital organ that produces bile that breaks down fats. – Also detoxifies chemicals – Synthesizes proteins – Stores Glycogen (energy) – Decomposes red blood cells – Hormone production Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 283. • Liver: Large, heavy, vital organ that produces bile that breaks down fats. – Also detoxifies chemicals – Synthesizes proteins – Stores Glycogen (energy) – Decomposes red blood cells – Hormone production Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 284. • Liver: Large, heavy, vital organ that produces bile that breaks down fats. – Also detoxifies chemicals – Synthesizes proteins – Stores Glycogen (energy) – Decomposes red blood cells – Hormone production Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 285. • Liver: Large, heavy, vital organ that produces bile that breaks down fats. – Also detoxifies chemicals – Synthesizes proteins – Stores Glycogen (energy) – Decomposes red blood cells – Hormone production Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 286. • Liver: Large, heavy, vital organ that produces bile that breaks down fats. – Also detoxifies chemicals – Synthesizes proteins – Stores Glycogen (energy) – Decomposes red blood cells – Hormone production It’s difficult to live long term without a liver because it performs so many functions Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 287.  Gall Bladder: A small pear-shaped organ that stores and concentrates bile from the liver. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 288.  Gall Bladder: A small pear-shaped organ that stores and concentrates bile from the liver. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 289.  Gall Bladder: A small pear-shaped organ that stores and concentrates bile from the liver. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 290. Liver Gall Bladder Intestine
  • 291. Liver Gall Bladder Intestine
  • 292. Liver Gall Bladder Intestine
  • 293. Liver Gall Bladder Intestine
  • 294. Liver Gall Bladder Intestine
  • 295. Liver Gall Bladder Intestine
  • 296. Liver Gall Bladder Intestine
  • 297. • How long does it normally take for the nutrients in your food to be absorbed in the intestine? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 298. • How long does it normally take for the nutrients in your food to be absorbed in the intestine? – A.) 5 days Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 299. • How long does it normally take for the nutrients in your food to be absorbed in the intestine? – A.) 5 days – B.) 5 hours Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 300. • How long does it normally take for the nutrients in your food to be absorbed in the intestine? – A.) 5 days – B.) 5 hours – C.) 5 minutes Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 301. • How long does it normally take for the nutrients in your food to be absorbed in the intestine? – A.) 5 days – B.) 5 hours – C.) 5 minutes – D.) 5 seconds Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 302. • How long does it normally take for the nutrients in your food to be absorbed in the intestine? – A.) 5 days – B.) 5 hours – C.) 5 minutes – D.) 5 seconds – E.) Nobody Knows Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 303. • How long does it normally take for the nutrients in your food to be absorbed in the intestine? – A.) 5 days – B.) 5 hours – C.) 5 minutes – D.) 5 seconds – E.) Nobody Knows Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 304. • How long does it normally take for the nutrients in your food to be absorbed in the intestine? – A.) 5 days – B.) 5 hours – C.) 5 minutes – D.) 5 seconds – E.) Nobody Knows Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 305. • The nutrients in your food get broken down into small substances (molecules) and are absorbed into your bloodstream. – Proteins to Amino Acids – Starches to simple sugars – Fats to Fatty Acids and Glycerol Once these are put into your bloodstream, they then can be used for energy and other purposes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 306. • The nutrients in your food get broken down into small substances (molecules) and are absorbed into your bloodstream. – Proteins to Amino Acids – Starches to simple sugars – Fats to Fatty Acids and Glycerol Once these are put into your bloodstream, they then can be used for energy and other purposes. “Hoot” “Hoot” “They are sure burning a lot of sugar running that fast.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 307. • The nutrients in your food get broken down into small substances (molecules) and are absorbed into your bloodstream. – Proteins to Amino Acids – Starches to simple sugars – Fats to Fatty Acids and Glycerol Once these are put into your bloodstream, they then can be used for energy and other purposes. “Hoot” “Hoot” “They are sure burning a lot of sugar running that fast.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 308. • The nutrients in your food get broken down into small substances (molecules) and are absorbed into your bloodstream. Once these are put into your bloodstream, they then can be used for energy and other purposes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 309. • The nutrients in your food get broken down into small substances (molecules) and are absorbed into your bloodstream. – Proteins to Amino Acids Once these are put into your bloodstream, they then can be used for energy and other purposes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 310. • The nutrients in your food get broken down into small substances (molecules) and are absorbed into your bloodstream. – Proteins to Amino Acids – Starches to simple sugars Once these are put into your bloodstream, they then can be used for energy and other purposes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 311. • The nutrients in your food get broken down into small substances (molecules) and are absorbed into your bloodstream. – Proteins to Amino Acids – Starches to simple sugars – Fats to Fatty Acids and Glycerol Once these are put into your bloodstream, they then can be used for energy and other purposes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 312. • The nutrients in your food get broken down into small substances (molecules) and are absorbed into your bloodstream. – Proteins to Amino Acids – Starches to simple sugars – Fats to Fatty Acids and Glycerol Once these are put into your bloodstream, they then can be used for energy and other purposes.
  • 313. • The nutrients in your food get broken down into small substances (molecules) and are absorbed into your bloodstream. – Proteins to Amino Acids – Starches to simple sugars – Fats to Fatty Acids and Glycerol Once these are put into your bloodstream, they then can be used for energy and other purposes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 314. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 315. • Food’s macronutrients undergo chemical breakdown as they move through the digestive system.
  • 316. • Food’s macronutrients undergo chemical breakdown as they move through the digestive system.
  • 317. • Food’s macronutrients undergo chemical breakdown as they move through the digestive system.
  • 318. • Food’s macronutrients undergo chemical breakdown as they move through the digestive system.
  • 319. • Food’s macronutrients undergo chemical breakdown as they move through the digestive system.
  • 320. • Food’s macronutrients undergo chemical breakdown as they move through the digestive system.
  • 321. • Food’s macronutrients undergo chemical breakdown as they move through the digestive system.
  • 322. • Food’s macronutrients undergo chemical breakdown as they move through the digestive system.
  • 323. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Proteins Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 324. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Proteins Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 325. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Proteins Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 326. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Proteins Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 327. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Proteins Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 328. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Proteins Starches Fats Amino Acids Simple Sugars Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 329. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Proteins Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 330. “Oh-no!” “We are trying it one more time.”
  • 331. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 332. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 333. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 334. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 335. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 336. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 337. • Activity! Please match the substance to the substance it gets broken down into. Starches Fats Amino Acids and Peptides Simple Sugars Glycerol Proteins Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 338. • Lab Activity Link! (Optional) More Advanced. – http://www4.smsd.org/debrabrewer/docs/Doc- 43408.pdf Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 339.  The small intestine is covered with millions of small fingerlike structures called villi. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 340. • The shape of the villi creates more surface area for the absorption of nutrients. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 341. • The shape of the villi creates more surface area for the absorption of nutrients. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 342. • The shape of the villi creates more surface area for the absorption of nutrients. orm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 343. • The shape of the villi creates more surface area for the absorption of nutrients. orm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 344. • The shape of the villi creates more surface area for the absorption of nutrients. orm ollows Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 345. • The shape of the villi creates more surface area for the absorption of nutrients. orm ollows Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 346. • The shape of the villi creates more surface area for the absorption of nutrients. orm ollows unction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 347. • The shape of the villi creates more surface area for the absorption of nutrients. orm ollows unction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 348. • The mop has ends similar to villi so that it will pick up the most dirt. – (More surface area) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 349. • The appendix is a small pouch that extends off the large intestine. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 350. • The appendix is a small pouch that extends off the large intestine. – Plays a role in preventing infection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 351. • The appendix is a small pouch that extends off the large intestine. – Plays a role in preventing infection. – Can rupture causing Appendicitis. • Appendix needs to be removed quickly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 352. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 353. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 354. • Undigested food then passes through the large intestine. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 355. • Undigested food then passes through the large intestine. – The large intestine is much thicker than the small intestine but much shorter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 356. • Undigested food then passes through the large intestine. – The large intestine is much thicker than the small intestine but much shorter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Cecum marks the beginning of the large intestine and is basically a big pouch that receives waste material from the small intestine.
  • 357.  Large Intestine: Water is absorbed, bacteria in the intestine also make important vitamins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 358.  Large Intestine: Water is absorbed, bacteria in the intestine also make important vitamins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy and it actually looks like…
  • 359.  Large Intestine: Water is absorbed, bacteria in the intestine also make important vitamins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 360.  Rectum: Short tube at the end of the large intestine that stores waste. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 361. • Rectum: Short tube at the end of the large intestine that stores waste. – Anus: Opening at the end of the rectum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 362. • Rectum: Short tube at the end of the large intestine that stores waste. – Anus: Opening at the end of the rectum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy What it actually looks like…
  • 363. • Rectum: Short tube at the end of the large intestine that stores waste. – Anus: Opening at the end of the rectum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy What it actually looks like…
  • 364. • Video! The Digestive System – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7xKYNz9 AS0&feature=related Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 365. • Activity! Teacher to minimize out of slideshow on the next slide. – Students drag images to complete digestive system as teacher controls on their computer. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 366. • Review Opportunity before Activity. (Optional) Virtual tour of Digestive System. – http://www.medtropolis.com/VBody.asp Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Review of lesson / learn more about the digestive system at… http://www.guam.net/pub/sshs/depart/science/mancuso/apbiolecture/3 2_DigestionNut/DigestionNutrition.htm
  • 367. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 368. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 369. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 370. Answer:
  • 371. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 372. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 373. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 374. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 375. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 376. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 377. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 378. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 379. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 380. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 381. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 382. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 383. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 384. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 385. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 386. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 387. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphyv
  • 388. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 389. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 390. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 391. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 392. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas “Ummm” “Doughnuts are good.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 393. “Oh-no!” “We are trying it one more time.”
  • 394. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas
  • 395. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 396. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 397. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 398. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 399. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 400. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 401. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 402. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 403. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 404. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 405. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 406. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 407. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 408. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 409. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 410. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 411. Mouth Pharynx Esophagus Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Pancreas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 412. Liver Small Intestine Large Intestine Stomach
  • 413. Liver Small Intestine Large Intestine Stomach
  • 414. Liver Small Intestine Large Intestine Stomach
  • 415. Liver Small Intestine Large Intestine Stomach
  • 416. Liver Small Intestine Large Intestine Stomach
  • 417. Liver Small Intestine Large Intestine Stomach
  • 418. Liver Small Intestine Large Intestine Stomach
  • 419. Liver Small Intestine Large Intestine Stomach
  • 420. Liver Small Intestine Large Intestine Stomach
  • 421. Pharynx Epiglottis Esophagus
  • 422. Pharynx Epiglottis Esophagus
  • 423. Pharynx Epiglottis Esophagus
  • 424. Pharynx Epiglottis Esophagus
  • 425. Pharynx Epiglottis Esophagus
  • 426. Pharynx Epiglottis Esophagus
  • 427. • Activity! Digestion Simulation – In the following simulation, we will be placing food into an assembly line that breaks apart instead of put together. – The class will be divided into various stations / organs of the digestive system. – Each station will either be mechanical digestion, chemical digestion, or both. – Students will add “chemicals” with spray bottles or mechanically shake / wave the bag and then pass it to the next group. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 428. • Activity! Digestion Simulation – In the following simulation, we will be placing food into an assembly line that breaks apart instead of put together. – The class will be divided into various stations / organs of the digestive system. – Each station will either be mechanical digestion, chemical digestion, or both. – Students will add “chemicals” with spray bottles or mechanically shake / wave the bag and then pass it to the next group. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 429. • Activity! Digestion Simulation – In the following simulation, we will be placing food into an assembly line that breaks apart instead of put together. – The class will be divided into various stations / organs of the digestive system. – Each station will either be mechanical digestion, chemical digestion, or both. – Students will add “chemicals” with spray bottles or mechanically shake / wave the bag and then pass it to the next group. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 430. • Activity! Digestion Simulation – In the following simulation, we will be placing food into an assembly line that breaks apart instead of put together. – The class will be divided into various stations / organs of the digestive system. – Each station will either be mechanical digestion, chemical digestion, or both. – Students will add “chemicals” with spray bottles or mechanically shake / wave the bag and then pass it to the next group. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 431. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 432. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 433. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 434. Mouth Saliva Pharynx Esophagus Stomach Pancreas Liver Gall Bladder Small Intestine Large Intestine Rectum Anus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 435. • Teacher double bags 3 “bites” of Cheerios with durable trash bags. (3 trials) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 436. • Teacher double bags 3 “bites” of Cheerios with durable trash bags. (3 trials) – Have tray under bags just incase as they move down the GI Tract. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 437. • Teacher double bags 3 “bites” of Cheerios with durable trash bags. (3 trials) – Have tray under bags just incase as they move down the GI Tract. – Students should use white paper to label their part of the GI Tract and keep it in front of them. – Questions will be addressed at the end of the process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Ex. Small Intestine
  • 438. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 439. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 440. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 441. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 442. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 443. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) Stomach: Students churn contents over and over again (mechanical). Students sprays with bottle (gastric juices) HCL (chemical). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 444. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) Stomach: Students churn contents over and over again (mechanical). Students sprays with bottle (gastric juices) HCL (chemical). Liver – Student passes bile (chemical) to the Gall Bladder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 445. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) Stomach: Students churn contents over and over again (mechanical). Students sprays with bottle (gastric juices) HCL (chemical). Liver – Student passes bile (chemical) to the Gall Bladder. Gall Bladder: Bile (jelly) is distributed to the bag (chemical) just after it enters small intestine. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 446. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) Stomach: Students churn contents over and over again (mechanical). Students sprays with bottle (gastric juices) HCL (chemical). Liver – Student passes bile (chemical) to the Gall Bladder. Gall Bladder: Bile (jelly) is distributed to the bag (chemical) just after it enters small intestine. Pancreas: Student sprays bottle into small intestine (chemical) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 447. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) Stomach: Students churn contents over and over again (mechanical). Students sprays with bottle (gastric juices) HCL (chemical). Liver – Student passes bile (chemical) to the Gall Bladder. Small Intestine: Wave and shake (Mechanical). One students sprays with bottle (mucous) Students take contents out of bag and press into strainer. Juice to collect in tray (Nutrients). Gall Bladder: Bile (jelly) is distributed to the bag (chemical) just after it enters small intestine. Pancreas: Student sprays bottle into small intestine (chemical) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 448. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) Stomach: Students churn contents over and over again (mechanical). Students sprays with bottle (gastric juices) HCL (chemical). Liver – Student passes bile (chemical) to the Gall Bladder. Small Intestine: Wave and shake (Mechanical). One students sprays with bottle (mucous) Students take contents out of bag and press into strainer. Juice to collect in tray (Nutrients). Gall Bladder: Bile (jelly) is distributed to the bag (chemical) just after it enters small intestine. Pancreas: Student sprays bottle into small intestine (chemical) Large Intestine: Students constantly use a sponge to collect any water that spills. Student also adds vitamins to the nutrient collection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 449. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) Stomach: Students churn contents over and over again (mechanical). Students sprays with bottle (gastric juices) HCL (chemical). Liver – Student passes bile (chemical) to the Gall Bladder. Small Intestine: Wave and shake (Mechanical). One students sprays with bottle (mucous) Students take contents out of bag and press into strainer. Juice to collect in tray (Nutrients). Gall Bladder: Bile (jelly) is distributed to the bag (chemical) just after it enters small intestine. Pancreas: Student sprays bottle into small intestine (chemical) Large Intestine: Students constantly use a sponge to collect any water that spills. Student also adds vitamins to the nutrient collection. Rectum: Student compacts material into a wad within a paper towel tube. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 450. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) Stomach: Students churn contents over and over again (mechanical). Students sprays with bottle (gastric juices) HCL (chemical). Liver – Student passes bile (chemical) to the Gall Bladder. Small Intestine: Wave and shake (Mechanical). One students sprays with bottle (mucous) Students take contents out of bag and press into strainer. Juice to collect in tray (Nutrients). Gall Bladder: Bile (jelly) is distributed to the bag (chemical) just after it enters small intestine. Pancreas: Student sprays bottle into small intestine (chemical) Large Intestine: Students constantly use a sponge to collect any water that spills. Student also adds vitamins to the nutrient collection. Rectum: Student compacts material into a wad within a paper towel tube. Anus: Student disposes of the wad into the trash barrel / compost at end with everyone in attendance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 451. Mouth - Students chew / mechanically break up Cheerios. Salivary Gland - Students use spray bottles to moisten food / chemically break down starches Pharynx – Student begins swallow reflex / shake bag (Mechanical) Esophagus: Students wave / shake bag (Peristalsis) and one student sprays with water (mucous) Stomach: Students churn contents over and over again (mechanical). Students sprays with bottle (gastric juices) HCL (chemical). Liver – Student passes bile (chemical) to the Gall Bladder. Small Intestine: Wave and shake (Mechanical). One students sprays with bottle (mucous) Students take contents out of bag and press into strainer. Juice to collect in tray (Nutrients). Gall Bladder: Bile (jelly) is distributed to the bag (chemical) just after it enters small intestine. Pancreas: Student sprays bottle into small intestine (chemical) Large Intestine: Students constantly use a sponge to collect any water that spills. Student also adds vitamins to the nutrient collection. Rectum: Student compacts material into a wad within a paper towel tube. Anus: Student disposes of the wad into the trash barrel / compost at end with everyone in attendance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “If each group / student can say a few words out loud when they perform the action everyone will learn more…Ex- “HCL stomach acid being added” or “bile headed to the gall bladder from the liver.”
  • 452. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 453. • Questions to Simulation? – Please write a short paragraph describing the GI Tract. Make sure to include some of the following in your response. • Chemical digestion • Mechanical Digestion • Mouth • Esophagus • Stomach • Liver • Gall Bladder • Pancreas • Small Intestine • Large Intestine • Rectum Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 454. • Questions to Simulation? – Please write a short paragraph describing the GI Tract. Make sure to include some of the following in your response. • Chemical digestion • Mechanical Digestion • Mouth • Esophagus • Stomach • Liver • Gall Bladder • Pancreas • Small Intestine • Large Intestine • Rectum Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 455. • The GI Tract begins in the mouth where food is broken down mechanically and chemically. The food passes through the pharynx and is moved down the esophagus to the stomach. Acid and movement break the food down further. Chemicals are produced and then released in the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas to the small intestine. Food is broken up further in the intestine and nutrients are absorbed. Water is absorbed in the large intestine and vitamins made. The waste is collects in the rectum until disposal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 456. • The GI Tract begins in the mouth where food is broken down mechanically and chemically. The food passes through the pharynx and is moved down the esophagus to the stomach. Acid and movement break the food down further. Chemicals are produced and then released in the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas to the small intestine. Food is broken up further in the intestine and nutrients are absorbed. Water is absorbed in the large intestine and vitamins made. The waste is collects in the rectum until disposal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 457. • The GI Tract begins in the mouth where food is broken down mechanically and chemically. The food passes through the pharynx and is moved down the esophagus to the stomach. Acid and movement break the food down further. Chemicals are produced and then released in the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas to the small intestine. Food is broken up further in the intestine and nutrients are absorbed. Water is absorbed in the large intestine and vitamins made. The waste is collects in the rectum until disposal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 458. • The GI Tract begins in the mouth where food is broken down mechanically and chemically. The food passes through the pharynx and is moved down the esophagus to the stomach. Acid and movement break the food down further. Chemicals are produced and then released in the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas to the small intestine. Food is broken up further in the intestine and nutrients are absorbed. Water is absorbed in the large intestine and vitamins made. The waste is collects in the rectum until disposal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 459. • The GI Tract begins in the mouth where food is broken down mechanically and chemically. The food passes through the pharynx and is moved down the esophagus to the stomach. Acid and movement break the food down further. Chemicals are produced and then released in the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas to the small intestine. Food is broken up further in the intestine and nutrients are absorbed. Water is absorbed in the large intestine and vitamins made. The waste is collects in the rectum until disposal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 460. • The GI Tract begins in the mouth where food is broken down mechanically and chemically. The food passes through the pharynx and is moved down the esophagus to the stomach. Acid and movement break the food down further. Chemicals are produced and then released in the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas to the small intestine. Food is broken up further in the intestine and nutrients are absorbed. Water is absorbed in the large intestine and vitamins made. The waste is collects in the rectum until disposal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 461. • The GI Tract begins in the mouth where food is broken down mechanically and chemically. The food passes through the pharynx and is moved down the esophagus to the stomach. Acid and movement break the food down further. Chemicals are produced and then released in the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas to the small intestine. Food is broken up further in the intestine and nutrients are absorbed. Water is absorbed in the large intestine and vitamins made. The waste is collected and compacted in the rectum until disposal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 462. • The GI Tract begins in the mouth where food is broken down mechanically and chemically. The food passes through the pharynx and is moved down the esophagus to the stomach. Acid and movement break the food down further. Chemicals are produced and then released in the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas to the small intestine. Food is broken up further in the intestine and nutrients are absorbed. Water is absorbed in the large intestine and vitamins made. The waste is collected and compacted in the rectum until disposal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 463. • Digestive System Available Sheet
  • 464. • Try and guess the mystery picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 465. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 466. • Try and guess the mystery picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 467. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 468. • Try and guess the mystery picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 469. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 470. Villi in the small intestine
  • 471. orm
  • 472. orm ollows
  • 473. orm ollows unction
  • 474. orm ollows unction
  • 475. • You should be close to page 14 in your bundle.
  • 476. • You can now lightly color these pictures and provide informative text in the white space.
  • 477. Atom Molecule Cell Organelle Cell Tissue Organ Organ System Individual orm ollows function Homeostasis: The ability of an organism or cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.regardless of outside conditions. Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. – Humans have some 75-100 Trillion Name the major bones shown below. Use your resource sheets •Long Bones •Flat Bones •Irregular Bones •Short Bones –Spongy Bone –Compact Bone Tendon Ligament Name these muscles Fast Food 
  • 478. Atom Molecule Cell Organelle Cell Tissue Organ Organ System Individual orm ollows function Homeostasis: The ability of an organism or cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.regardless of outside conditions. Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. – Humans have some 75-100 Trillion Name the major bones shown below. Use your resource sheets •Long Bones •Flat Bones •Irregular Bones •Short Bones –Spongy Bone –Compact Bone Tendon Ligament Name these muscles Fast Food 
  • 479. Atom Molecule Cell Organelle Cell Tissue Organ Organ System Individual orm ollows function Homeostasis: The ability of an organism or cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.regardless of outside conditions. Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. – Humans have some 75-100 Trillion Name the major bones shown below. Use your resource sheets •Long Bones •Flat Bones •Irregular Bones •Short Bones –Spongy Bone –Compact Bone Tendon Ligament Name these muscles Fast Food  Name them
  • 480. Atom Molecule Cell Organelle Cell Tissue Organ Organ System Individual orm ollows function Homeostasis: The ability of an organism or cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.regardless of outside conditions. Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. – Humans have some 75-100 Trillion Name the major bones shown below. Use your resource sheets •Long Bones •Flat Bones •Irregular Bones •Short Bones –Spongy Bone –Compact Bone Tendon Ligament Name these muscles Fast Food  Name them
  • 481. Atom Molecule Cell Organelle Cell Tissue Organ Organ System Individual orm ollows function Homeostasis: The ability of an organism or cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.regardless of outside conditions. Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. – Humans have some 75-100 Trillion Name the major bones shown below. Use your resource sheets •Long Bones •Flat Bones •Irregular Bones •Short Bones –Spongy Bone –Compact Bone Tendon Ligament Name these muscles Fast Food  Name them Villi
  • 482. • Video Link! Digestive System Crash Course. (Optional and advanced) – Preview for language. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s06XzaKqELk
  • 483. • PowerPoint Review Game: The Digestive System Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 484. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tstPlease visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet.
  • 485. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p=1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
  • 486. Human Body Unit Part VI/XIII The Digestive System Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 487. Bundled homework package, lesson notes, worksheets, review games, and much more on the full unit.