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Five Statements that changed the course of the School of Teaching ESL

Five Statements that changed the course of the School of Teaching ESL

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5 statements 5 statements Presentation Transcript

  • FIVE STATEMENTS THAT CHANGED THE COURSE OF THE SCHOOL OF TESL
  • “Someday you’ll be a school.”
    Who said it? Joe Helms, Student Advisor, ELS Language Center
    When? 1984
    Why? Nan Butler had just returned from a meeting with Seattle University Office of Off-Campus Education and gotten approval to offer a course titled “TESL Theory and Application” (now the foundation course, EPDES 930 “TESOL Theory and Education”).
  • ELS Language Center, Campion Tower, Seattle University, Office of the Student Advisor. Note the electric typewriter, lots of paper files, a rotary phone with long cord.
    Some day you’ll be a school.
    Nan at ELS in 1984
  • “We are desperate for a summer intensive.”
    Who said this? The two night classes of “TESL Theory and Application” in Spring Quarter, 1988
    Why? They were mostly public school teachers who wanted summer credits in TESL.
    The result? Nan Butler quit her job at ELS Language Center and offered the first Intensive TESL class in her dining room in August, 1988
  • Intensive TESL class in Nan Butler’s dining room – a tight fit, but a successful course.
  • “Let’s give this a name, already.”
    Who said this? The August, 1988, Intensive TESL class.
    Why? They were tired of hearing Nan Butler say “This is the way I think you should teach” and insisted we give the overall approach a name.
    The result? Facilitative Language Teaching.
  • Facilitative Language TeachingBelow is an early version’s start. FLT has undergone numerous rewordings and clarifications but is still the core of the School of Teaching ESL classes.
    FACILITATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING
    (copyright Butler, 1993) 
    Facilitative Language Teaching was originally called “This is how I think you should teach languages, and why” by Dr. Butler, when the School of TESL was in its infancy. The Intensive I class of August, 1988, gave the pedagogy a name: Facilitative Language Teaching. Details of the pedagogy and ways of expressing it were worked out more formally at the annual staff retreat in the Fall of 1992. FLT is revisited periodically by the staff so that it truly presents what we, as the staff of the School of TESL, endorse.
     
    I. UNDERLYING THEORIES AND BELIEFS:
    Language is more than a formal system. It is a tool which people use to set and accomplish personal and social goals. Language is acquired through understanding and use. This can take place in the classroom as well as in natural settings. In the classroom, the end result of focusing on message is fluency. In the classroom, the end result of focusing on form is the students' ability to monitor the accuracy of their language. Students have control over their own learning, and teachers serve as facilitators in the learning process.
     
    II. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN:
    Needs analysis: It is important to determine the students' needs for learning English. This analysis draws upon students' perceived needs as well as the instructor's information about what students will need.
  • “Please buy the Peppermint Playhouse.”
    Who said this? A friend who wanted to retire from owning/running the Peppermint Playhouse, a Montessori preschool in Ballard.
    When? 1990
    The result? In 1991, the school was moved from temporary headquarters near Northgate to Ballard, where it remained for 13 years. The preschool was closed.
  • The Peppermint Playhouse became The Little Red School of TESL House.
  • “I need a challenge.”
    Who said this? Bernice Ege-Zavala
    When? 2003
    Why? Nan Butler wanted to retire; Bernice Ege-Zavala was ready to train for transition to the directorship of the School of Teaching ESL.
    The result? Bernice Ege-Zavala became the Director and moved the school to its current Licton Springs locale.
  • The Director and the School of TESL, 2010