FDRP/FrontSUMMIT ™ Formula: Service is a Product
Agenda <ul><li>Industry Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Employment in Restaurants </li></ul><ul><li>Clientele – Understanding W...
<ul><li>Looking at the industry as a whole, the amount of generated   revenue and employment numbers are of critical value...
Restaurateurs Role as Employer
Clientele Who We Serve <ul><li>By better understanding who are customers are we can better know what they expect from our ...
Size:  The largest segment with 78 Million people Education:  More boomers went to college, including women, than in previ...
Education:   Well educated and comfortable with technology, which makes them less patient. They need genuine respect and c...
Clientele  Gen Y Notable Trend
Clientele How did they get so knowledgeable? <ul><li>Television offers 24/7/365 “foodie” channels </li></ul><ul><li>Number...
Clientele: Expectations ZAGAT SURVEY® Restaurant Conference Based on over 100,000 customers Restaurant Customer Complaints...
So  why  are there so many more complaints about service than food?  Because most entrepreneurs fail to meet clients’ expe...
A Successful Dish The Composition Quality Ingredients Appealing Presentation Valid Recipe or Method Substitutions Modifica...
A Successful Dish The Composition A component failure here can ruin  the dish. Quality Ingredients Appealing Presentation ...
A Successful Service Quality Ingredients Appealing Presentation Valid Recipe or Method The Composition Professional & Dedi...
A Successful Service The Composition A component failure here can ruin  the experience! Quality Ingredients Appealing Pres...
A Success Business The Composition Utilize the FDRP/FrontSUMMIT ™  tools to  enhance your Service “Product” In order to pr...
<ul><li>Food Essentials </li></ul><ul><li>Basic Cooking Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Wine Essentials </li></ul><ul><li>Prod...
Service is a Product Server Skill <ul><li>Safe, Sanitary and Effective Procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Smooth is Fast & Fast ...
Service is a Product Appealing Presentation Create an Appealing Presentation of Professional and Dedicated Staff with the ...
Service is a Product Conclusion <ul><li>The FDRP formula provides your team a win-win with: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A standa...
Thank You! Introducing the Federation of  Dining Room Professionals  Service Is A Product
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Service is a Product

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Treat Service like the cuisine at your property. Excellent Service begins with Great Training.

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  • This presentation is to inform you about the Federation of Dining Room Professionals (FDRP), give you a special perspective on the hospitality industry and the value of a treating Service as a Product.
  • The hospitality industry is a 3 Trillion Dollars business annually. Everyone has to eat, has to have some fun and sometimes need to travel, whether for work, pleasure or other reasons. Thus it is the second largest employer in the US after the Government (and that is encompassing the army and all federal states and employees filling many different types of functions). That makes Hospitality industry the largest industry in the country. Most of which is made of small businesses.
  • This article is just an example of what is happening to the industry and how much opportunity there is for us to succeed.
  • Now, let us review who our customers are. It is important because it helps us understand what they expect from us and thus how we can appeal to different groups to grow our businesses.
  • The largest segment of the population is the “Baby Boomers”. They are all the people born between 1945 and 1964. Now having enough life and business experience to allow them to earn better wages affords them to spend more and treat themselves better. Couple that with the empty nest (If they had children early in their 20’s) and this segment of the population is primed to enjoy themselves. This mirrors the Industry trends explained earlier. Their life cycle change into mid-life will impact retailing in the next 20 years.
  • This reflects the fact that generations following the baby Boomers are following their tracks of becoming ‘gourmets” and culinarians. After all, you are here to watch this presentation yourself, so you must have some sense of awareness that there is something good around the culinary world. But make no mistake! The “Culinary” world is a lot more than just cooking! It is also in big part about how you treat people and understand others. “Ego” and fulfillment is as big a part of a dining experience as it is of a career.
  • The demand for professionally prepared food has grown so much that it has impacted many unexpected sectors. Yes, the number of culinary schools has multiplied, but so has the number of publication and other media. This is important because it means two things: 1) there are more professionals out-there than ever before, which makes the industry a more competitive market within itself, and 2) the clientele’s knowledge has greatly expended. Customers are more aware and can more effectively recognize quality. Last-but-not least, for every cook/chef there is in a casual restaurant, there is a double number of staff working in the dining room or other position—so there is a real demand and need for professional in the FOH.
  • The ZAGAT Survey is the number one restaurant review and rating in the country and many parts of the world. This study—in fact a survey—was made a couple of years ago across 100,000 people who are members of the ZAGAT Survey. You should, as a culinarians and aspiring hospitality professional, buy the ZAGAT Guide for yourself. It is enlightening for a professional to be able to read how our customers rate us, what they think, what they tell us and don’t tell us directly. It will help you understand you clientele expectation and it will help you avoid becoming complacent about your success or hospitality prowess&apos;s.
  • This slide restates the components of cooking—ingredients, a method and a presentation aspect--all of which affect the customer. The importance of having quality ingredients is that the dish turns out as expected. Otherwise some substitutions can be made, but oftentimes the dish must simply be removed from the menu (Modifications to the Menu).
  • So now that we have determined that service is as much a product as cooking, let’s look at some of the items FDRP programs have to help you improve the Service Product.
  • Create a win-win environment for both culinarians and business owner by implementing our programs. Of note, business owners can serve their business best by running their restaurant from the Dining room. There, they can recognize the customers, make sure they are treated well. They can watch over the service AND the food since all the plates made in the kitchen end up in the dining room anyway. And of course, they always have the opportunity to go help the kitchen when it is in difficulty. Last-but-not-least, they also know best what is in their kitchen, and their relationship to their clientele helps them having a greater influence on what the customers eat, which allows for better inventory management. The dining room is a win-win place to be.
  • Service is a Product

    1. 1. FDRP/FrontSUMMIT ™ Formula: Service is a Product
    2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>Industry Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Employment in Restaurants </li></ul><ul><li>Clientele – Understanding Who We Serve </li></ul><ul><li>What Makes a Successful Dish? </li></ul><ul><li>What Makes a Successful Service? </li></ul><ul><li>Service as a Product </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Looking at the industry as a whole, the amount of generated revenue and employment numbers are of critical value to the economy: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Three Trillion Per Year - $3,000,000,000.00 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Second largest employer in the United States, after the government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80% of foodservice operations are small businesses, employing less than 10 people </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Even in a tight economy, people will continue to dine out when they can, companies will need to have personnel travel on business, and people will gather for special occasions. </li></ul>Our Industry
    4. 4. Restaurateurs Role as Employer
    5. 5. Clientele Who We Serve <ul><li>By better understanding who are customers are we can better know what they expect from our profession. </li></ul><ul><li>At the risk of generalization, there are several key groups who spend money in our establishments: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Baby Boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Gen X (those born between 1965 and 1980) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Gen Y (those born between 1981 and 1995) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>These groups have various characteristics that lead to different demands on those employed in the hospitality industry. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Size: The largest segment with 78 Million people Education: More boomers went to college, including women, than in previous generations. Leisure time: Hectic lifestyles are common for baby boomers, with their leisure time infringed upon by the various demands of life. Spending: The independent, self-focused, mid-life baby boomer will spend money, cash or credit, on luxuries. Dining out: Seek to ease their daily lives and want convenience and quality Clientele Baby Boomer’s Characteristics ‘ Boomers’ are those people born between 1946 and 1964. Traits:
    7. 7. Education: Well educated and comfortable with technology, which makes them less patient. They need genuine respect and can spot a patronizing person from 50m. Brand Loyalty: They have little or no brand loyalty! And yet, don’t let your brand get a soiled image… because antipathy to bad brands is strong. Spending: Even though these generations are experiencing a wallet squeeze due to the economy, many of them are also inheriting their parents “Baby Boomer” money. Dining out: Instant gratification rules! They’d rather eat out or spend-up big on luxury items (holidays, clothes, dining out, sound equipment, gadgets). Some have the debt to prove it. Clientele Gen X and Gen Y Characteristics Gen-X are those people born between 1965 and 1980. Gen-Y are those people born between 1981 and 1995. Traits:
    8. 8. Clientele Gen Y Notable Trend
    9. 9. Clientele How did they get so knowledgeable? <ul><li>Television offers 24/7/365 “foodie” channels </li></ul><ul><li>Number of Food & Beverage publications increased 12-fold in just 15 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Number of Culinary Schools increased 10-times in the last 18 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Square footage of supermarkets Food-to-Go preparation / service area quadrupled in the last 18 years. </li></ul>Over a number of years, the general public has been bombarded with information on food & wine: The result has been higher expectations for the delivered product when dining.
    10. 10. Clientele: Expectations ZAGAT SURVEY® Restaurant Conference Based on over 100,000 customers Restaurant Customer Complaints === Good Food is Expected === Service is Wanted === 62% Service 62% 13% Noise 13% 11% Food 11% 4% Smoking 4% 3% Crowds 3% 3% Prices 3% Cleanliness 2% Parking 1% 4% Other 1% Food Related 18% Service Related 82%
    11. 11. So why are there so many more complaints about service than food? Because most entrepreneurs fail to meet clients’ expectations. Why does that happen? Because they focus on the production of food and forget that . . . Service is a Product, too ! Clientele Expectations Achieve Expectations to Grow Your Business
    12. 12. A Successful Dish The Composition Quality Ingredients Appealing Presentation Valid Recipe or Method Substitutions Modification of the Menu Alternative Methods Recipe Variations Various Designs Temperature & Seasoning
    13. 13. A Successful Dish The Composition A component failure here can ruin the dish. Quality Ingredients Appealing Presentation Valid Recipe or Method
    14. 14. A Successful Service Quality Ingredients Appealing Presentation Valid Recipe or Method The Composition Professional & Dedicated Career Oriented Mastered Skills Safe, efficient, elegant Food & Beverage Knowledge
    15. 15. A Successful Service The Composition A component failure here can ruin the experience! Quality Ingredients Appealing Presentation Valid Recipe or Method
    16. 16. A Success Business The Composition Utilize the FDRP/FrontSUMMIT ™ tools to enhance your Service “Product” In order to provide a seamless experience for our demanding customer groups, we must work towards flawless delivery of both products.
    17. 17. <ul><li>Food Essentials </li></ul><ul><li>Basic Cooking Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Wine Essentials </li></ul><ul><li>Product Identification & Cuts (Professional and Master programs) </li></ul><ul><li>Diet Restrictions (Professional and Master programs) </li></ul><ul><li>Cooking Methods (Professional and Master programs) </li></ul><ul><li>Common Terminologies </li></ul><ul><li>Food Temperatures </li></ul><ul><li>Basics of Wine Making </li></ul><ul><li>Common Terminology </li></ul><ul><li>Food & Wine pairing </li></ul><ul><li>Beer & Cocktails Essentials </li></ul>Service is a Product Server Knowledge FDRP Covers Up to 11 Industry Topics
    18. 18. Service is a Product Server Skill <ul><li>Safe, Sanitary and Effective Procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Smooth is Fast & Fast is Smooth </li></ul><ul><li>Dining Room Smart Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment Identification </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment Handling </li></ul><ul><li>Techniques of Food Service </li></ul><ul><li>Beverages Service </li></ul><ul><li>Menu Handling and other Protocols </li></ul><ul><li>Order taking </li></ul><ul><li>Special functions service </li></ul><ul><li>Common sense rules </li></ul>Implement Measurable Standards
    19. 19. Service is a Product Appealing Presentation Create an Appealing Presentation of Professional and Dedicated Staff with the FDRP/FrontSUMMIT™ Formula How one feels about his/her career automatically becomes obvious to the customer!
    20. 20. Service is a Product Conclusion <ul><li>The FDRP formula provides your team a win-win with: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A standard of hospitality to which they can easily relate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A sense of pride and accomplishment that comes from knowledge and skills training </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Additional career options </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Valuable credentials through certification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clientele marketing opportunity by servers who wear certification pins </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A fast path to increased employee and customer satisfaction </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Thank You! Introducing the Federation of Dining Room Professionals Service Is A Product

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