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Sfs17 1 bmg-canvas pdf Sfs17 1 bmg-canvas pdf Presentation Transcript

  • Module 15.1Business Modeling Jim Beach & Chris Hanks
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.2
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.3
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.4
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.5
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.6
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.7
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.8
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.9
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. An organization serves one or more customer segments. Customer groups are separate if: • Their needs require and justify a distinct offer. • They are reached through different channels. • They require different types of relationships. • They have different profitabilities. • They are willing to pay for different aspects of the offer. Slide 17-1.10
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Types of customer segments. Mass Market large group, similar needs, consumer electronics market Niche Market specific needs, seen in supplier- buyer relationships (car parts) Segmented similar needs but varying problems, ie. Micro Precision makes watches, medical supplies, automation Slide 17-1.11
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Types of customer segments. Diversified unrelated segments, ie. Amazon sells cloud services, online storage, on demand server usage, books all using their IT infrastructure Multi-Sided need two sides to work, credit card holders and acceptors Slide 17-1.12
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.13
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Business seeks to solve customer problems and needs with a VP. VP why you choose one company over another. Bundle of benefits offered to customers. Slide 17-1.14
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. What value is delivered to the customer? Which problem are we solving? Which needs are we satisfying? What bundles of products for what segment? Slide 17-1.15
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Non-exclusive list of contributors to VP Newness Performance Customization Price “Getting the job done” Slide 17-1.16
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Design Brand/Status Cost Reduction Accessibility Convenience Usability Slide 17-1.17
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.18
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. VP are delivered to customers through communications, distribution, and sales Channels. Slide 17-1.19
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Channel Functions: • Raising awareness of products. • Helping customers evaluate the VP. • Allowing customers to purchase products. • Delivering a VP to customers. • Providing post purchase support. Slide 17-1.20
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.21
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Through which channel do our customers want to be reached? How are we reaching them now? How are channels integrated? Which ones are most cost- efficient? How do you integrate them with customer routines? Slide 17-1.22
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.23
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Customer Relationships are established and maintained with each Customer Segment. Slide 17-1.24
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. What type of relationship does each segment expect? What is established now? How costly are they? How are they integrated with the rest of the model? Slide 17-1.25
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Personal assistance Dedicated personal assistance Self-service Automated services Communities Co-creation Slide 17-1.26
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.27
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Revenue Streams result from value propositions successfully offered to customers. Slide 17-1.28
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. What will your customers really pay? What do they pay? How do they pay now? How would they like to pay? How much does each stream contribute? Slide 17-1.29
  • Transaction & Recurring revenue© School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Asset sale Usage fees Subscription Lending/Renting/Leasing Licensing Brokerage fees Advertising Slide 17-1.30
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.31
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Key Resources are the assets required to deliver the products. Slide 17-1.32
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. What key resources do our value propositions require? Our distribution channels? Our customer relationships? Revenue streams? Slide 17-1.33
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Physical Intellectual Human Financial Brand Slide 17-1.34
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.35
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Products delivered by performing Key Activities. Slide 17-1.36
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. What key activities do our value propositions require? Our distribution channels? Our customer relationships? Revenue streams? Slide 17-1.37
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Production Problem solving Platform/Network Slide 17-1.38
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.39
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Some activities are outsourced and some resources come from outside your business. Slide 17-1.40
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Who are your partners? Key suppliers? What do we require from them? What do they do for us? Can we live without them? Slide 17-1.41
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Optimization and economies of scale Reduction of risk and uncertainty Acquisition of particular resources and activities Slide 17-1.42
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.43
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. The Model results in the cost structure. Slide 17-1,44
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. What are the most important costs inherent in the model? Which key resources are the most expensive? Which key activities are most expensive? Slide 17-1.45
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Cost driven and Value driven Fixed costs Variable costs Economies of scale Economies of scope Slide 17-1.46
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.47
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.48
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.49
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. Efficiency Logic Emotion ValueSlide 17-1.50
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.51
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.52
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.53
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.54
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  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.58
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved.Slide 17-1.59
  • © School For Startups. All Rights Reserved. THANKS! Buy or Review!Next: Lesson 2 Patterns Slide 17-1.60