Understanding the Ethnic
Consumer
ETHNIC MARKETING OF LAMB & MUTTON
26 NOVEMBER 2013
KATHERINE M HARRISON
•What is your marketing

plan for your farm?
•Do you utilize the

product you raise? Do
you promote it?
•Are you connected...
Value-Added Approach to Sheep & Goats
Conventional livestock &

grain farm in a rural
town in central Ohio
Off-farm jobs...
Changing Communities, Changing Demographics
Our small rural town was
becoming another suburb:

Our area was welcoming
dive...
Niche Marketing
•WE KNEW THE MARKET WAS THERE.
•WE HAD THE PRODUCT THE MARKET DEMANDED.
•WE NEEDED A MEANS TO KEEP OUR FAM...
Blystone Farm
Butcher Shop,
opened 2004
We worked with several
entities to ensure
compliance with
regulations and to gain
...
What are consumers seeking?
FRESH product
Ability to pick their own animal
Having the kill done in a ritual manner
Abi...
Marketing to Ethnic Communities
 Understand Ritual Slaughter:

Halal Kills and Kosher Kills
have specific requirements
 ...
Custom, On-Farm, Ritual Slaughter
 ODA inspected
 Full-time staff: family, Part-time

help from ethnic community
 Lives...
The West African, North
African, and Middle
Eastern Muslim
Communities buy
numerous lambs in OH.
Buyers tend to prefer a
f...
How can a
farmer reach
these markets?
Consider all options for
marketing animals:
stockyards, direct-topacker, direct-toco...
Meet
Mohamed
Abdi!
 Somali Bantu







refugee
Receives EBT
Devout Muslim
Halal butcher
Father of TEN!
Goat Enthus...
Do You Have “Good” Sheep?
In the ethnic community,

fresh products are highly
esteemed.
Other buzzwords include
“pure”, ...
Economics of
Lamb & Goat
Production
Production of lamb &
goat is rising.
Consumers are
recognizing the value of
locally ra...
Ethnic (Direct) Marketing
 There can be difficulties in communicating between cultures. Patience &

understanding can sol...
Identify a niche and
market to it!
Understand what your
chosen consumer seeks!
Promote the unique
quality of your product!...
Questions?
www.blystonefarm.com
Blystone Farm on

Facebook
kmhh13@yahoo.com
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Understanding the Ethnic Consumer

836

Published on

This presentation was the second in a four-part series on the ethnic marketing of lamb and mutton. It was prepared by Katherine Peterson, whose family has a farm and butcher shop in Ohio.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
836
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Understanding the Ethnic Consumer"

  1. 1. Understanding the Ethnic Consumer ETHNIC MARKETING OF LAMB & MUTTON 26 NOVEMBER 2013 KATHERINE M HARRISON
  2. 2. •What is your marketing plan for your farm? •Do you utilize the product you raise? Do you promote it? •Are you connected to the consumer of your product? Do you know what your end consumer desires? •Do you collaborate with other producers? •Have you become politically active as a farmer? •Are you proud of being a farmer? How do cultural components shape “ethnic markets” and what products do these consumers seek?
  3. 3. Value-Added Approach to Sheep & Goats Conventional livestock & grain farm in a rural town in central Ohio Off-farm jobs supplemented farm income from sheep & goat production As a family, we were committed to keeping our farm functional, intact, and in the family.
  4. 4. Changing Communities, Changing Demographics Our small rural town was becoming another suburb: Our area was welcoming diverse cultural groups: Many local farms were Central Ohio has becoming subdivisions It was no longer feasible to farm using conventional methods and still make a profit Livestock prices fluctuated dramatically become home to a number of immigrant & refugee groups These individuals continue to seek their traditional sources of protein, typically lamb & goat meat
  5. 5. Niche Marketing •WE KNEW THE MARKET WAS THERE. •WE HAD THE PRODUCT THE MARKET DEMANDED. •WE NEEDED A MEANS TO KEEP OUR FAMILY FARM OPERATIONAL & PROFITABLE. •WE WERE COMMITTED AS A FAMILY TO MAKING A NEW BUSINESS VENTURE A SUCCESS. •WE WANTED TO ENSURE WE APPROACHED THIS PRUDENTLY & PROPERLY AS A BUSINESS.
  6. 6. Blystone Farm Butcher Shop, opened 2004 We worked with several entities to ensure compliance with regulations and to gain more knowledge. Ohio Revised Code Ohio Department of Agriculture County EPA Ohio State Extension Ohio State University Meat Lab Ohio Sheep Improvement Association
  7. 7. What are consumers seeking? FRESH product Ability to pick their own animal Having the kill done in a ritual manner Ability to take home their favorite parts Clean processing location Pleasant customer experiences Opportunity to visit a farm Every consumer seeks different products – understand your specific market.
  8. 8. Marketing to Ethnic Communities  Understand Ritual Slaughter: Halal Kills and Kosher Kills have specific requirements  Learn that cultural traditions of communities also dictate slaughter & processing  Appreciate that cooking techniques of meat products influence the manner in which it is butchered  Recognize that communication styles and purchasing protocols vary around the world
  9. 9. Custom, On-Farm, Ritual Slaughter  ODA inspected  Full-time staff: family, Part-time help from ethnic community  Livestock purchased from farmers throughout the Midwest  East African (Ethiopia, Eritrea) Orthodox Christian Community largely seeks ewes  Cultural slaughter preferences & preparation techniques  Meat served with injera, vegetables, cheeses  Major holidays: Ethiopian Christmas, Lent, Orthodox Easter, Ethiopian New Year
  10. 10. The West African, North African, and Middle Eastern Muslim Communities buy numerous lambs in OH. Buyers tend to prefer a finished lamb around 100 pounds, but will purchase smaller animals or culls dependent upon price. Major Celebratory Observances: Ramadan, Eid al Fitr, Eid al Adha, Baby Naming. Meat is typically served with vegetables and rice. Spices & cheeses are relied upon. Fruit based juices are popular. Eid al Adha: High Muslim Holy Day, Festival of the Sacrifice, honoring the patriarch Abraham
  11. 11. How can a farmer reach these markets? Consider all options for marketing animals: stockyards, direct-topacker, direct-toconsumer. Investigate farmer’s markets that accept EBT & WIC. Be mindful of holiday times – these can trigger high prices! Understand the desired products for specific buyers/holidays. Follow all regulations regarding sales. 2014 2015 2016 Ramadan 6/28 6/18 6/6 Eid al Fitr 7/29 7/18 7/7 Eid al Adha 10/4 9/23 9/11 Western Christmas 12/25 12/25 12/25 Orthodox Christmas 1/7 1/7 1/7 Western Easter 4/20 4/5 3/27 Orthodox Easter 4/20 4/12 5/1 Ethiopian New Year 9/11 9/11 9/11 Passover 3/15-22 4/4-11 4/23-30 Chanukah 12/17-24 12/7-14 12/25-1/1
  12. 12. Meet Mohamed Abdi!  Somali Bantu       refugee Receives EBT Devout Muslim Halal butcher Father of TEN! Goat Enthusiast! Budget Conscious  Will someone on a tight budget continue to choose an expensive meat in light of increased livestock prices?
  13. 13. Do You Have “Good” Sheep? In the ethnic community, fresh products are highly esteemed. Other buzzwords include “pure”, “organic”, and “natural”. In reality, though, their definitions do not match USDA standards. The ethnic focus is on farm fresh, preferably local, products. Budgetary constraints, however, impact buying decisions. Consumers seek custom processed, ritually slaughtered products . . . But will choose imported frozen meats if the price is right. Ethnic customers tend to utilize rice & breads to stretch meals.
  14. 14. Economics of Lamb & Goat Production Production of lamb & goat is rising. Consumers are recognizing the value of locally raised products. Sheep & goats are small, easy to manage, and reproduce rapidly. Prices will continue to fluctuate until the production nears the demand, and there is a steady supply available. There is a greater demand for goat & lamb than the current supply in America. The demand drives the price up for fresh, ritually slaughtered goat & lamb. Generally the individuals who enjoy these products have budgetary restraints. The supply is supplemented by frozen Australian & New Zealand product, available at lower cost.
  15. 15. Ethnic (Direct) Marketing  There can be difficulties in communicating between cultures. Patience & understanding can solve many problems – even with fellow Americans!  Different cultures emphasize different styles of purchasing – understand, but be firm. Always make sure to finalize payment!  Seek educational opportunities to gain cultural understanding: agricultural educational venues, internet resources, international groups.  Never hesitate to ask questions to learn what a customer is seeking; knowledge is always beneficial.  The ethnic community relies on word-of-mouth promotion; use positive personal experiences to promote your farm. Periodicals welcome advertising from American businesses & farms.  Illegal slaughter may seem like a quick way to make money, but it impacts the entire industry: educate yourself on regulations regarding slaughter and do not set yourself up for failure!  Smiles & thanks are universally appreciated!
  16. 16. Identify a niche and market to it! Understand what your chosen consumer seeks! Promote the unique quality of your product! Set a price that justifies production! Profit is NOT a dirty word in farming! Eat your product – use what you produce! Network with producers to share ideas! Connect with your governmental leaders! There is no enterprise as ancient and noble as the care of the earth and its creatures.
  17. 17. Questions? www.blystonefarm.com Blystone Farm on Facebook kmhh13@yahoo.com
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×