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  • 1. THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN BY GEORGE DENG, DANIEL JANG, CHRIS MILLS, DAVID NEUBERGER, AND CHRIS ROM THEMES ALONG THE RIVER
  • 2. 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6
  • 3. 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 X X The Wreck “ I begun to think how dreadful it was, even for murderers, to be in such a fix. I says to myself, there ain’t no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet, and then how would I like it?” escape the wreck by stealing the robbers skiff. Looking back on the Walter Scott, Huck is struck by a feeling of sympathy for the robbers. Just moments earlier, he and Jim had been in the same situation, only they had a contingency plan. His e mpathy is not characteristic of a trouble maker. Tom Sawyer obviously is not very empathetic, since he forces Jim and Huck through a ridiculous ruse all so he can self-servingly lead an escapade. This scene points out the contrast between Huck’s lowly background and his high moral imperative, which we see him continue to develop in the next segment. Huck decides, against the pleadings of Jim, to explore the wreck of the steamboat named Walter Scott. On the wreck, discovers that robbers have beaten him to the plundering opportunity. Huck and Jim manage to
  • 4. 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 X X X The Feud “ "There ain't a coward amongst them Shepherdsons -- not a one. And there ain't no cowards amongst the Grangerfords either."  "about brotherly love" further displays apparent contradictions within each families' respective way of life.  Do Harney and Sophia represent a Romeo and Juliet? Huckleberry Finn and Jim find comfort on the river--especially after witnessing the feud firsthand. The Mississippi is a conduit for personal growth and isolation from society's ills, and as Huck says, "there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft." The Grangerford-Shepperdson feud is representative of an older, aristocratic way of life. Twain emphasizes the irony of the feud as, in the words of Buck, "they don't know now what the row was about in the first place."Bringing guns to church and listening to a sermon of
  • 5. 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 X X X The Wreck “ I begun to think how dreadful it was, even for murderers, to be in such a fix. I says to myself, there ain’t no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet, and then how would I like it?” the robbers skiff. Looking back on the Walter Scott, Huck is struck by a feeling of sympathy for the robbers. Just moments earlier, he and Jim had been in the same situation, only they had a contingency plan. His empathy is not characteristic of a trouble maker. Tom Sawyer obviously is not very empathetic, since he forces Jim and Huck through a ridiculous ruse all so he can self-servingly lead an escapade. This scene points out the contrast between Huck’s lowly background and his high moral imperative, which we see him continue to develop in the next segment. Huck decides, against the pleadings of Jim, to explore the wreck of the steamboat named Walter Scott. On the wreck, discovers that robbers have beaten him to the plundering opportunity. Huck and Jim manage to escape the wreck by stealing
  • 6. 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 X X X The Feud “ "There ain't a coward amongst them Shepherdsons -- not a one. And there ain't no cowards amongst the Grangerfords either."  "about brotherly love" further displays apparent contradictions within each families' respective way of life.  Do Harney and Sophia represent a Romeo and Juliet? Huckleberry Finn and Jim find comfort on the river--especially after witnessing the feud firsthand. The Mississippi is a conduit for personal growth and isolation from society's ills, and as Huck says, "there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft." The Grangerford-Shepperdson feud is representative of an older, aristocratic way of life. Twain emphasizes the irony of the feud as, in the words of Buck, "they don't know now what the row was about in the first place."Bringing guns to church and listening to a sermon of
  • 7. 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 X The Feud “ "There ain't a coward amongst them Shepherdsons -- not a one. And there ain't no cowards amongst the Grangerfords either."  love” further displays apparent contradictions within each families' respective way of life.  Do Harney and Sophia represent a Romeo and Juliet? Huckleberry Finn and Jim find comfort on the river--especially after witnessing the feud firsthand. The Mississippi is a conduit for personal growth and isolation from society's ills, and as Huck says, "there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft." The Grangerford-Shepperdson feud is representative of an older, aristocratic way of life. Twain emphasizes the irony of the feud as, in the words of Buck, "they don't know now what the row was about in the first place.“ Bringing guns to church and listening to a sermon of "about brotherly
  • 8. 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 X X X The Feud “ "There ain't a coward amongst them Shepherdsons -- not a one. And there ain't no cowards amongst the Grangerfords either."  "about brotherly love" further displays apparent contradictions within each families' respective way of life.  Do Harney and Sophia represent a Romeo and Juliet? Huckleberry Finn and Jim find comfort on the river--especially after witnessing the feud firsthand. The Mississippi is a conduit for personal growth and isolation from society's ills, and as Huck says, "there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft." The Grangerford-Shepperdson feud is representative of an older, aristocratic way of life. Twain emphasizes the irony of the feud as, in the words of Buck, "they don't know now what the row was about in the first place."Bringing guns to church and listening to a sermon of
  • 9. 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 X X X The Feud “ "There ain't a coward amongst them Shepherdsons -- not a one. And there ain't no cowards amongst the Grangerfords either."  "about brotherly love" further displays apparent contradictions within each families' respective way of life.  Do Harney and Sophia represent a Romeo and Juliet? Huckleberry Finn and Jim find comfort on the river--especially after witnessing the feud firsthand. The Mississippi is a conduit for personal growth and isolation from society's ills, and as Huck says, "there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft." The Grangerford-Shepperdson feud is representative of an older, aristocratic way of life. Twain emphasizes the irony of the feud as, in the words of Buck, "they don't know now what the row was about in the first place."Bringing guns to church and listening to a sermon of
  • 10. 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 3 4 1 2 5 7 8 6 X X X The Feud “ "There ain't a coward amongst them Shepherdsons -- not a one. And there ain't no cowards amongst the Grangerfords either."  "about brotherly love" further displays apparent contradictions within each families' respective way of life.  Do Harney and Sophia represent a Romeo and Juliet? Huckleberry Finn and Jim find comfort on the river--especially after witnessing the feud firsthand. The Mississippi is a conduit for personal growth and isolation from society's ills, and as Huck says, "there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft." The Grangerford-Shepperdson feud is representative of an older, aristocratic way of life. Twain emphasizes the irony of the feud as, in the words of Buck, "they don't know now what the row was about in the first place."Bringing guns to church and listening to a sermon of
  • 11.
      • The Adventures of Huck Finn . Dir. Stephen Sommers. Perf. Elijah Wood, Courtney B. Vance,
      • Robbie Coltrane. Walt Disney Video, 2003. Film.
      • "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Pictures." eNotes - Literature Study Guides, Lesson
      • Plans, and More. eNotes, n.d. Web. 31 May 2011.
      • Twain, Mark, and Victor Fischer. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Tom Sawyer's comrade.
      • Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001. Print.
    Works Cited