Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Chapter 5 Summary
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Chapter 5 Summary

55
views

Published on

Published in: Self Improvement

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
55
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. topic The subjectof a speech. Usually the speech topic is determined by the occasion, the audience, and the speaker’s qualifications. There are two broad categories of potential topics for your classroom speeches: (1) subjects you know a lot about and (2) subjects you want to know more about. subjects you know a lot about and Here are a few more examples of speech topics based largely on the students’ personal knowledge and experience: Interning at a Crime Lab The Basics of Backpacking Performing with the Native American Dance Troupe How to Have a Successful Job Interview subjects you want to know more about. - topic that you want to explore for the first time. - Your interest - For example your interested in gardening and you know nothing about it. brainstorming A method of generating ideas for speech topics by free association of words and ideas.
  • 2. Topic – the subject of the speech - usually determined by the occasion, audience and the speaker’s qualification. 2 Broad Categories of potential topics for classroom: 1) Topics you know about 2) topics you want to know more about. Brainstorming – is a method of generating ideas for speech topic by free association ofwords and ideas. Brainstorming Procedures. 1) Personal Inventory – write everything that comes to your mind.Like experiences,interests,hobbies,skills. If the first brainstorming procedure didn’twork you could try: 2) Clustering – make a category like : People,Places,Things,Events,Processes,Concepts,Natural Phenomena. By clustering mostpeople could generate their topic quickly, but if it still doesn’twork you could try: 3) internetsearch – you could try browsing encyclopedia,do Google search for hot topics,browse dictionary. note: It is very useful to write down everything rather than thinking it and keeping the topics on your brain. general purpose - The broad goal of a speech. - Usually it will fall into one of two overlapping categories—1) to inform 2) is to persuade. 1) to inform - When your general purpose is to inform, you act as a teacher or lecturer. 2) to persuade - When your general purpose is to persuade, you act as an advocate(supporter, believer) or a Partisan - You want, convince your audience. specific purpose A single infinitive phrase thatstates preciselywhata speaker hopes to accomplish in his or her speech. Once you have chosen a topic and a general purpose, you must narrow your choices to determine the specific purpose of your speech. for example: topic : animal cruelty General Purpose: to persuade Specific Purpose: To persuade people from the food industries that the practice of production of foi gras by force feeding or gavage should be abolished because it is cruel to the animals and because there are natural ways to produce foi gras without force feeding. on the example: Specific purpose should include audiences
  • 3. TIPS FOR FORMULATING THE SPECIFIC PURPOSE STATEMENT Write the Purpose Statement as a Full Infinitive Phrase, Not as a Fragment. for example: ineffective: 3d- technology effective : To inform my audience about the three major kinds of current 3-D technology. ANOTHER ONE: ineffective : Supercars Effective: To inform car enthusiasts about the latest Features of the new 2015 Ferrari 458 note: the audience is specific, and also the car is specific too. Express Your Purpose as a Statement, Not as a Question Ineffective: What is Día de los Muertos? More Effective: To inform my audience about the history of Mexico’s Día de los Muertos celebration Avoid Figurative Language in Your Purpose Statement Ineffective: To persuade my audience that the campus policy on student parking really stinks. More Effective: To persuade my audience that the campus policy on student parking should be revised to provide more spaces for students before 5 p.m Limit Your Purpose Statement to One Distinct Idea Ineffective: To persuade my audience to become literacy tutors and to donate time to the Special Olympics. This purpose statement expresses two unrelated ideas, either of which could be the subject of a speech. The easiest remedy is to select one or the other as a focus for your presentation. More Effective: To persuade my audience to become literacy tutors. Or: More Effective: To persuade my audience to donate time to the Special Olympics.
  • 4. Make Sure Your Specific Purpose Is Not Too Vague or General Ineffective: To persuade my audience that something should be done about unsafe school buses. More Effective: To persuade my audience that the federal government should impose stronger safety standards for school buses in the United States. The second specific purpose statement is more specific. Another example: Topic: Hot-air balloons. Specific Purpose: To inform my audience about hot-air balloons.