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From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
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From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’

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Dissertation of Johannes Schubert …

Dissertation of Johannes Schubert

From ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’
- the metamorphosis towards holistic brand communication

This documents aims to explore the nature of this transition and its consequences for brands and the creative industry from design to advertising by starting with an analysis of the impact of digital technology within the western society (Europe and US). As we realize the shift from a communication principle which can be characterised by the words ‘This is it.’ to a model of ‘Here I am.’ which puts people and brands on equal level, we zoom into the resultant changes in the world of brands. Analyzing the behaviour and expectations of today‘s consumers we can understand in what way the end of the traditional mass-media dominance presents a challenge to the current setup of commercial communication.

The author then explains the recent reactions of agencies, portraits their changing way of working and presents different ground-breaking case studies of creative brand communication that create appreciated value in people‘s life. This document is based on intensive research in the creative industry of London and Hamburg (centres of European Communication Design and Advertising) including various meetings with different types of professionals (i.e. Creative Director, Copywriter, Designer, Planner) of internationally reknown agencies (i.e. Mother, Jung von Matt, BBH, Rapp, Landor), studies of relevant literature (books and periodicals) and a continuous and extensive global web research (mainly journals, blogs, speeches and presentations). The content of his current postgraduate studies of Advertising at Bucks New University as well as discussions with professionals from the client side of Marketing (i.e. Lufthansa) and research from this perspective have assured the author about the accuracy of his observation of a tendency in commercial communication from ‘Product Marketing to Marketing Products’.

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  • 1. Soft Copy THANK YOU EVERYBODY FOR SHARING SO MANY INSIGHTS. NOW IT‘S MY TURN. ENJOY. JOHANNESSCHUBERT@GMAIL.COM
  • 2. FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ FROM About the author: As a graduate of Design Factory Hamburg, Germany (with one term at International School of Communication Design, Zhuhai, China) Johannes can look back to studies which included advertising and design and has won a couple of international awards in both fields. ‘This is iT’ At the same time he has gained experience in the professional life working for traditi- onal and digital advertising agencies (including Jung von Matt, Proximity, BBH and Mother London) as well as design agencies and is operating a wide range of communi- cation projects under the label schatzi&schatzi with his partner Annabel. Johannes will complete his studies of MA Advertising at Bucks New University in 12/2009. Johannes Schubert TO the metamorphosis towards holistic brand communication ‘heRe i aM’ johannesschubert@gmail.com Johannes Schubert Bucks New University Faculty of Creativity & Culture UK +44 7551 581 606 October 2009 Tutor: Dr. Ray Batchelor Word Count: 8000 GeR +49 93 19 46 04 MA Advertising Wycombe College Module: ADM02
  • 3. FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 3 Table of contents Acknowledgment 5 Introduction 7 1 The digital age 9 The everyday life of digitally empowered people 13 A new kind of media is turning consumers into ‘prosumers’ 15 Moore’s Law is determining the progress of digital reality experiences 17 it is about technology in a human context 19 2 What does this mean to brands? 25 The end of marketing as we know it 27 Are there any rules on this bazaar? 29 Don‘t be evil 33 Marcus Aurelius Roman emperor 1 From designing products to designing brand experiences 35 Of each particular thing ask: 3 What do the people want? 37 People are seeking the great experience of being alive 41 What is it in itself? What is its nature? Rules for authentic communication 45 4 Crisis. What crisis? 47 Dead men walking? 49 Time for Titanium 53 Silos and Strawberries 55 5 What is our job? 59 Making clients succeed through strategic creativity 63 A new way of working 67 Creativity that fits in 69 Conclusion 71 Account of sources 73 Dear Reader, Rather than following the convention of including tangentially relevant information into formal appendices or footnotes, I have elected instead to put these parts into coloured ‘information boxes’ throughout to create a magazine-like experience. This is why pictures are not numbered on the page. An overview of the used illustrations classified by page-number is part of the Account of sources. Here you are. Johannes Schubert 1 Global Oneness, Marcus Aurelius <http://www.experiencefestival.com/a/Marcus_Aurelius_-_Roman_emperor/id/5275301> accessed on 02.05.2009
  • 4. FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 5 Acknowledgment Bucks New University: Bruce Sinclair Dr. Ray Batchelor Waqar Riaz my fellow students at Bucks New University London: Martin Runnacles, Ultegra Consulting Ian Haworth, Rapp Stuart Outwraight, Mother Sara Tate, Mother Adam Arnold, BBH Maximilian Gerdau, BBH Johannes Hermann Matt Pyke Artist 2 Hamburg: The more connections I make, Michael Hoinkes Götz Ulmer, Jung von Matt the further I can reach across the world Stefan Walz, Kolle Rebbe Tobias Schupp finding inspiration in every person New York: that I meet. Simon Kelley, Keith Blanchard and Michael Perry, Story Worldwide Many thanks to AKQA, AMV BBDO, BBH, EHS Brann, Elvis, IDEO, Jung von Matt, Landor, M&C Saatchi, Mother London, Rapp, R/GA, Story, Volume and Wunderman Special thanks to Tim Brown and Aradhana Goel, IDEO Bob Greenberg and Nick Law, R/GA for sharing knowledge. Helge Tennø, Russel Davis, Faris Yakob and many many more for continually blogging me up to date Dedicated to the wife of my dreams and our great families with thanks to the one who is the A and Ω. 2 Vimeo, Nokia E71, Universal Everything - 6 billion people, 6 billion colours <http://www.vimeo.com/2818289> accessed on 17.04.2009
  • 5. FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 7 Introduction The opening of the world wide web by Tim Berners-Lee on August 6th of 1991 at CERN is seen nowadays as the entry into the current digital age. His invention, the Web 1.0 which is connecting digital devices has spread all over the world and become a part of our lives on both private and professional level. The rise of the humanized ‘Web 2.0’ (Tim O’Reilly)3 which is connecting people, enables internet consumers to actively participate in its creation. This democratization of the media landscape is ‘shifting the power away from the editors, the publishers, the establishment, the media elite.’ (Rupert Murdoch)4 This documents aims to explore the nature of this transition and its consequences for brands and the creative industry from design to advertising by starting with an analysis of the impact of digital technology within the western society (Europe and US). As we realize the shift from Tim Berners-Lee a communication principle which can be characterised by the words ‘This is it.’ to a model of ‘Here I am.’ which puts people and brands on equal level, we zoom into the resultant chan- ges in the world of brands. Analyzing the behaviour and expectations of today‘s consumers Anonymus we can understand in what way the end of the traditional mass-media dominance presents a challenge to the current setup of commercial communication. The one who has the power over the images The author then explains the recent reactions of agencies, portraits their changing way of wor- also has the power over the people. king and presents different ground-breaking case studies of creative brand communication that create appreciated value in people‘s life. This document is based on intensive research in the creative industry of London and Hamburg (centres of European Communication Design and Advertising) including various meetings with different types of professionals (i.e. Creative Director, Copywriter, Designer, Planner) of internationally reknown agencies (i.e. Mother, Jung von Matt, BBH, Rapp, Landor), studies of relevant literature (books and periodicals) and a continuous and extensive global web research (mainly journals, blogs, speeches and presentations). The content of his current postgraduate studies of Advertising at Bucks New University as well as discussions with professionals from the client side of Marketing (i.e. Lufthansa) and research from this perspective have assured the author about the accuracy of his observation of a tendency in commercial communication from ‘Product Marketing to Marketing Products’. 3 Wikipedia, Web 2.0 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0> accessed on 21.07.2009 4 Slideshare, Online Trends August 2009 <http://www.slideshare.net/belm/online-trends-august-2009> accessed on 19.09.2009
  • 6. 1 FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 9 Roy Amara former President of the institute for the Future 5 The digital People tend to overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run. age 5 Campaign Viewpoint, Faris Yakob, The invisible web <http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/news/features/855000/Digital-Viewpoint-invisible-web> accessed on 14.02.2009
  • 7. 1 - The digital age 11 Take a minute to think about how And what about you experienced Michael Jackson the death of in 2009? Lady Di in 1997.
  • 8. 1 - The digital age 13 The everyday life of digitally empowered people Today when we set up a video conference on Skype, comment on our friend‘s holiday pictures on Facebook (to announce that we just booked a trip on Cheapflights.com to another inte- resting location we didn’t know it existed some hours ago, before looking at some impressive pictures by ZhengHan87 from Shanghai at flickr) or simply explore the new collection of a New Zealand based designer of eatable jewellery on ebay, we are mostly not aware that our power of communication is crossing borders that seemed insuperable only years ago. In the age of semiconductors (processing power), ferromagnetic compounds (storage), and fiber optics (bandwidth) that progresses towards unlimited information and total intercon- nection, the world without Google’s help is hard to imagine. This is why the company which was founded only in 1998 with the mission ‘to organize the world‘s information and make it universally accessible and useful’6 generally tops rankings (i.e.: Milward Brown Optimor7, FastCompany8, Good Brands9) being the most powerful and innovative brand alive. The ri- sing popularity of online search advertising is benefitting Google, which owns 73%10 of the market share. The digitalization of cameras and camcorders has equally changed the way we picture the world as the conversion from physical records to audio-downloads, from videos and TV- Broadcasts to High-Definition and media on demand is influencing the way we culturally explore it. Both powerful and user-friendly software such as Apple‘s iLife (coming with every Mac) promises to provide everyone who wants to become a movie director, music producer or graphic artist with the essential tools required for creative expresion. Mobiles that have a vast range of functions beyond making calls are becoming tools empow- ering us to lead our everyday digital life. Being multi-media content creators we capture and share ideas and impressions with our global friends and are able to access information from every corner of the earth at all times. The promise of Apple‘s tagline promoting the iPhone application store summarizes the impact of digital on our daily lives: ‘There is an app for everything.’10 6 Google, Mission statement <http://www.google.com/corporate> accessed on 29.05.2009 7 Milward Brown Optimor, BrandZ Top 100 Ranking, pdf (April 29th 2009), <http://www.millwardbrown.com/Sites/Optimor> accessed on 01.06.2009 8 FastCompany, Fast 50 <http://www.fastcompany.com/fast50_09> accessed on18.08.2009 9 PSFK, Good Brands Report <http://www.psfk.com/psfk-good-brands-report-2009> accessed on 18.08.2009 10 Apple Homepage <http://www.apple.com> accessed on 29.05.2009
  • 9. 1 - The digital age 15 A new kind of media is turning consumers into ‘prosumers’ Interviewing Stefan Walz11 (Creative Director, Kolle Rebbe, The star of traditional local and national TV and Radio stations and newspapers seems to Hamburg, Germany) who has won a number of Awards (inclu- fade at the same time that the digital age is dawning on the media industry. The web can be ding Cannes-Lions, ADC of Germany and Europe, LIAA and classified as a new kind of massmedia as it enables both a fusion of texts, voice, pictures and One Show) for his works which go to the edge of digital com- video for diffusion to a wide group of individual recipients as well as its bi-directional charac- mercial communication, about his work he underlines the im- ter allows unique interactivity. portance of providing made-to-measure content to the people and the need for active engagement. Another of its aspects is, that it blurrs the line between non-commercial and commercial communication. Every user of the internet can take an active role and broadcast his or herself The internet is the perfect media for an interactive society (the promise of YouTube). On the other hand established publishers can lose their influence that participates and is full of people that want to see and be in controling the media when their predetermined structure of media products is identified seen by sharing, commenting and rating content. as being distant, inconvenient and dictatorial compared to digital citizen media channels sharing relevant User Generated Content (UGC) which are regarded as being close, personal He describes the changing media behaviour with the example of and democratic. This fact has helped small businesses that have nothing to loose to become a 16-year girl old who has stopped watching TV, as she can use succesful when they understand the situation and make it a part of their concept. Companies Stefan Walz YouTube (which has become the second biggest search engine) like myMuesli have grown very quickly, as they totally incorporate the UGC (User Generated to create her own playlists and avoid annoying ringtone-ads. Content) in their community building business and communication strategy. Advertising agencies therefore have to switch from creating The shift is going from one-way pushed messages that are communicated by professional traditional ads to creating relevant and engaging content – a broadcasters to a number of consumers, to an enlaced viral network of scores of amateur discipline where they can learn from digital agencies who broadcasters12 (charts p.14). This change can also be described as the transition from broad- are used to convince users to deliberately access websites and casting to narrowcasting. Although we have to consider that some people have so many fol- establish a positive attitude towards the brand which does lowors, that they can actually be considered broadcasters. Ashton Kutcher famous for the something for them or starts a conversation.11 BlahGirls.com (an interactive, animated Web series that focuses on celebrity gossip, fashion, relationships and life as it happens)13 has 3,588,467 followers on twitter to ‘pull’ from him.14 MyMUeSLi.COM, The ONLiNe ShOP TO ORDeR yOUR OWN BLeND OF MUeSLi As a consequence of the democratisation of tools and the defining culture of sharing all kind of information at increasingly no-cost, citizens of the digital world from being passive consu- By interacting very personal on social networking sites such as Facebook the three mers are turning into interactive ‘prosumers’. At this occasion let us quote Wikipedia16 - the founders of the company are establishing a lifestyle around the brand that attracts a big free encyclopedia that anyone can edit, which has become the largest (more than 13 million number of friends. The community around the german start-up enterprise of the year articles15...) and most popular (... in over 200 languages14) general reference work on the 2007 is now sucessfully growing internationally. Internet and is continueing to grow at a rate of 156 articles/hour15): ‘The description prosu- mer describes the converse to the consumer with a passive role, denoting an active role as the individual gets more involved in the process.’16 + US newspaper circulation is down 9 million over the last 25 years. But in the last 5 years unique + More video was uploaded to youTube in the readers of online newspapers are up 30 million. last two months than if ABC, NBC and CBS had + There are more than 200 million blogs been airing new content 24/7/365 since 1948.17 54% of bloggers post content or tweet daily 11 Stefan Walz, Creative Director, Kolle Rebbe, Hamburg, interviewed on 23.04.2009 in Hamburg 12 Martin Runnacles, Lesson at Bucks New University, MA Advertising at 09.03.2009 13 BlahGirls.com <http://www.blahgirls.com> accessed on 17.08.2009 14 Twitterholic, statistics of Ashton Kutcher <http://twitterholic.com> accessed on 17.08.2009 15 One-Way Communication ‘Peer to Peer‘ Communication Media Convergence, Promotional video for Conference hosted by The Economist <http://mediaconvergence.economist.com> accessed on 17.08.2009 16 Wikipedia, Prosumer <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosumer> accessed on17.08.2009 17 YouTube, Social Media Revolution <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIFYPQjYhv8> accessed on 28.07.2009
  • 10. 1 - The digital age 17 Moore‘s Law is determining ... digital reality experiences the progress of ... Still being a teenager the internet has already had an overwhelming impact on our global civilization, but with both faster connections and more availability through the rise of black- berries, the iconic iPhone, pdas, netbooks and many more devices (as the ubiquitous internet of things is step by step arriving) its importance is becoming even more fundamental. The continuous developing digital reality is becoming the home for a ‘global society’18 that is technologicaly empowered and interconnected and because of that able to change the world. (Gordon Brown)18. Its citizens are both explorers of the digital sphere as well as their architects acting as multi-media content creators, capturing and sharing ideas and impressions with MOORe‘S LAW illustrated by the their global ‘friends’ (bear in mind that the social network Facebook with its more than 300 development of intel processors million users19 has enhanced the concept of what the term ‘friend’ can mean). Increasingly Martin heidegger at former analogue and ‘offline’ environments (the so called ‘first life’) we are confronted by digitally influenced situations (such as the shown Lego Packagings using Augmented Reality) Real-time services such as Twitter or the upcoming GoogleWaves redefine our understanding of what is a conversation is. As a consequence the seperation between the digital and the real world has already become an out-of date concept. 20 years after inventing the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee20 is asking the world to provi- de raw data for a new type of web which links data. The bigger the amount of the linked data provided the more powerful computerized analysis which is to play a fundamental role in our daily life by helping us to make sense of the shared knowledge of the world. One hope for this Web 3.0 is, that it is to be a groundbreaking tool in countless areas of research and culture, such as the fight against diseases on a TED-conference in February 200920. Of course it is the Faris yakob content of many discussions if it is one big step towards computerized intelligence (the Web 4.0 is expected to arrive around 205021). We can be sure that this evolution digital technology will enhance our reality. Faris Yakob (EVP Chief Technology Strategist, McCann Erickson New York) describes that the more invisible the web turns the more powerful it is beco- ming, giving the philosopher Martin Heidegger’s example of the blind person’s cane which becomes like an organ for the user to experience his environment: WiRiNG A WeB FOR GLOBAL GOOD Gordon Brown speaks on 21 July 2009 The social impact of the web will only become evident at a TeD conference in Oxford, UK when it is ubiquitous – a tool used so intuitively by the generation that grows up once this happens that it is no longer a tool, but an extension of yourself.22 Augmented Reality with Webcam in-Store Use of Augmented Campaign for BMW Z4 Reality by LeGO 18 TED, Gordon Brown, Wiring a web for a global good <http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/gordon_brown.html> accessed on 24.07.2009 19 Tagesschau.de, Facebook macht erstmals Gewinn <http://www.tagesschau.de/wirtschaft/facebook136.html> accessed on16.09.2009 20 TED, Tim Berners-Lee, The next web <http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/tim_berners_lee_on_the_next_web.html> accessed on 14.03.2009 21 Karl Fisch, Scott McLeod, Did you know 3.0 <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpEnFwiqdx8> accessed on 17.01.2009 22 Yakob F., The invisible web
  • 11. 1 - The digital age 19 It is about technology in a human context Heidegger‘s dynamic can be observed already today, as we are fading into a post-digital24 age (Russel Davis) where for example ebooks are becoming books, and IM (digital instant mes- sages) become ‚message‘. As the reality of space (i.e. through GPS or digital compassing) and time (there is no past on the searchable web) melt into the experience (SPIME - the device knows when and where it is), digital is becoming more transparent. Just as phoning is no longer about the technological experience of making a phone call, social research25 analyses that NO, This is NOT people tend to go online to find people they know and tend to replicate, at least in part, TwiTTeR laNguage. ANyALyZe your family their social performances online.These performances, the communities that they occur in videotapes, or read your and the dialects that they represent and produce should be the critical loci for research in first emails and you the postdigital age, not the technologies themselves.25 Russel Davis notice how language is changing over time. As an open document of the international 52group26 (teachers reflecting on teaching in digital times) descri- bes this transition from an educational perspective: The speed of the change, however, has left us with the mistaken belief that social change was somehow ‘created‘ by the digital rather than simply played out on a the canvas of the digital; that the digital itself is the main driver of change. We would argue the opposite. This ontological error has had us move towards placing technology at the forefront (think e-learning as distance learning) and moving our focus away from the people involved in these processes; the needs that they have and the skills that they bring.26 Thinking PeOPLe first ‘We are stuck with technology when what we really want is just stuff that works.’27 Maybe this quotation of Douglas Adams explains the groundbreaking success of the iPhone which not only transformed the smartphone market but can be seen as one of the forerunning products in human-centric communication design. SixThSeNSe is a wearable gestural interface that augments the physical world around us with digital information and lets us use natural hand gestures to interact with the information. By using a camera and a tiny projector mounted in a pendant like wearable device, SixthSense sees what you see and visually augments any surfaces or objects we are interacting with. it projects information onto surfaces, walls, and physical objects around us, and lets us inter- 23 act with the projected information through natural hand gestures, arm movements, or our Pranav Mistry, SixthSense, <http://www.pranavmistry.com/projects/sixthsense/> accessed on 23.02.2009 24 interaction with the object itself. 'SixthSense' attempts to free information from its confines Russel Davis, meet the new schtick <http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2009/01/meet-the-new-schtick.html> accessed on 18.01.2009 by seamlessly integrating it with reality, and thus making the entire world your computer.23 25 Department for Continuing Education at the University of Oxford <http://tallblog.conted.ox.ac.uk/index.php/category/society> accessed on 12.08.2009 26 52 Group, Open Document <http://docs.google.com/View?id=aqv2zmc9bgm_51ft65rbn2> accessed on 16.08.2009 27 Virtual Strategy Magazine <http://www.virtual-strategy.com/December-2008-Executive-Viewpoint/Executive-Viewpoint-Tom-Joyce-Akorri.html> accessed on 24.01.2009
  • 12. 1 - The digital age 21 People are becoming brands just as brands are becoming people Before we enter the second chapter which will talk about brands in the digital age let us analyze the american presidential election campaign of Barack Obama (who is sometimes refered as the first internet president) that represents the literal bridge between a brand and a person. His approach to include various audiences in order to become a true people’s spokeman and spread the optimistic and involving message of ‘Change’ and ‘Yes we can.’ was more than a financial success (650 Mill $), assured by donations of in average only $100 given by private individuals.28 All other candidates before had mostly relied on the support by higher donations of companies or rich individuals. In terms of communication the ‘marketing’ of Obama can be seen as a ground-breaking modern political campaign with global reach and wide participati- on. Media was the engine and people were the fuel of this multi-layered masterpiece creating a people‘s president. David Droga More than half of U.S. adults used the Internet to participate in the 2008 election and around 55 percent searched for political news online, researched candidate positions, deba- ted issues or otherwise participated in the election over the Internet. 45 percent of Internet users watched online videos related to politics or the election; 33 percent of Internet users shared political content with others, 52 percent of those on a social network used it for political purposes.29 Through the use of various online channels Obama achieved to gain the respect of large amounts of members of the growing part of the ‘long tail’ (see p. 32) of american voters who don‘t show a clear social affiliation to the democratic or republic party including ethnical and religious minorities as well as groups with special interests. The integrating spirit in his com- munication when he was talking about what ‘we’ can do instead of talking what ’he’ would do, created a historical movement of the american people by establishing an empowering group feeling expressed in the distinctive tagline: ‘Yes, we can.’ This big thought could be sensed in every fractal of the brand architecture. This campaign which ‘parts created something which was bigger than the sum of them’31, (David Droga, Droga5) is winning unprece- dentedly many creative awards (including both the Titanium and Integrated Grand Prix of the 2009 Cannes Lions, Grand Clio, etc.). Professionals in commercial communication study this movement as it ‘changed business as usual for everyone.’ (Fast Company32). Learn about the visual identity of Obama‘s campaign in a Neewsweek interview with MiChAeL BieRUT, Graphic Designer and Critic at Design Observer http://blog.newsweek.com/blogs/stumper/archive/ 2008/02/27/how-obama-s-branding-is-working-on-you.aspx 28 Campaign Magazine, supplement March 2009, Digital Essays 29 Reuters Online News <www.reuters.com/article/internetNews/idUSTRE53E6FP20090415> accessed on 15.04.2009 30 Cannes Lions 2009, Press Conference Titanium and Integrated Lions <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfiBQJCSdZw> accessed on 05.07.2009 31 FastCompany, The Brand Called Obama <http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/124/the-brand-called-obama.html> accessed on 15.04.2009
  • 13. FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 23 From to ‘This is it’ ‘Here I am’
  • 14. 2 FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 25 What A.G. Lafley CeO and Chairman, Procter & Gamble 32 Consumers are beginning in a very real sense to own our brands and participate in their creation. does it mean to We need to begin to learn to let go. brands? 32 Slideshare, TBWA on Change <http://www.slideshare.net/MADblog/tbwa-quote-compilation-on-change-1226374> accessed on 23.04.2009
  • 15. 2 - What does it mean to brands? 27 The end of marketing as we know it Commercial communication follows consumers. Companies investing in branding and mar- keting their products or services recognize this fact as well as agencies that build bridges from brands to people. Analyzing the history of commercial communication (comparing for example content and tonality of ‘public information’ spots in the 50s to current viral movies) we notice why advertising can be seen as a mirror of society and how brands are continually drawing nearer to their consumers. It is obvious that the sender-receiver monologue communications principle has to be ret- hought which sucessfully generated ‘brand fans’ (Scholz&Friends, Berlin)33 in an ancient age characterized by few brands. Their mostly packaged products were equipped with clear USPs, which simplified the decision process of easy to reach consumers in the few supermakets. The branding could focus on corporate identity and the packaging design while mass media do- minance and high advertising acceptance were a paradise for marketing.33 Martin Runnacles Nowadays in an age of ‘atomized and parallel media consumption’33, brand choice is com- plex as we have become brand sceptics that are more difficult to reach because we suffer from sensory and mental overload (more than 3000 messages per day)33 which leads to ahigh ad- vertising rejection rate, (actually 65% of the people feel constantly bombarded with ads)33. The market is flooded with many (often exchangeable) brands, as everything (no matter how untangible) can be a product today (the German market saw a flop rate of 70% in 2008).33 As a consequence only 18% of traditional TV campaigns generate a positive ROI (return on investment).34 The decay of prize for Adspace in TV or Print is an indicator that traditional media space is loosing importance at the same time as online advertising is rising. So how to talk to customers in an information age where digital is turning the world of commercial communication upside down and ‘Everything a brand does that connects to the consumer is media’35 (Lee Clow, Director of Media Arts, TBWA Worldwide)? Lee Clow Russel Davies Strategist & Author 36 There‘s a limited amount of attention in the world. If more of it is going to personal, non-commercial, un-advertised media, less of it will go to advertising. New wave COMMuNiCaTiON MOdel by Martin Runnacles, ultegra Consulting With the shift of power from broadcasters and brands to people many communication models are running out of date. Runnacles‘ marketing hypothesis does not primarily consider the digital space as an advertising possibilty but shows the potential of hos- ting the complete customer journey including raising awareness to purchase. 33 Scholz&Friends, Dramatic Shift in Marketing <http://blog.envision-grp.com/2009/01/scholz-friends-dramatic-shift-in.html> accessed on 04.06.2009 34 YouTube, Social Media Revolution 35 Slideshare, TBWA on Change 36 Russel Davies, 2008 - the year of peak advertising <http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2008/01/2008---the-year.html> accessed on 22.01.2009
  • 16. 2 - What does it mean to brands? 29 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yGc4zOqozo Are there any rules on this bazaar? The Cluetrain Manifesto compare today’s marketplaces to a global bazaar. In order to be eco- nomical it is important to raise a matching voice to become a part of the global conversation. People are put in a strong position in which they can freely decide what they like and share with their friends and what they don‘t recommend. A number of bad online reviews on important platforms can harm the launch of a new pro- duct or service. A good proof for this point are the highly discussed attempts of doctors in the US trying to remove their footprint of negative patient reviews on rating sites such as Zagat’s and Angie’s List.37 There is no space for dark secrets in an information enlightened age. As people rate and comment on almost everything, the internet is ‘shifting the power away from the editors, the publishers, the establishment, the media elite.’ (Rupert Murdoch).38 Just like the doctors who try to stop their patients from sharing online reviews by giving them waivers which they have to sign vowing to stay silent, companies remaining in the model of ancient brand behaviour to tell people what to think about their products will eventually come into serious image problems as the processes of companies marketing are getting de- mystified. Not accepting this reality can easily leave a participator (whether it is a company or an individual) being considered arrogant and distant. Murdoch, one of the most influential global media entrepreneurs states the fact that ‘now it‘s the people who are in control.’38 Companies have to ensure that they are customer-relevant in order to prosper. Services or products have to be useful and available when and where people need them. A study in the second quarter of 2009 published by Microsoft for Europe (‘Europe logs on - European Inter- net Trends of Today and Tomorrow’39) predicts that by June 2010 the use of the internet will top the use of TV. 65% of the time is spend on news, video and communication platforms while e-commerce is taking the second place with 33%. Now is the crucial time for brands to make this medium their home. That is why factors like SEO (Search Engine Optimization) are becoming a crucial part of modern product marketing and brand management. Rupert Murdoch eaT OR be eaTeN siNgeR geTs his ReveNge ON uNiTed aiRliNes aNd sOaRs TO FaMe Tools like the social barometer measuring brand conversations below indicate how strong United Airlines Dave Carroll couldn't get compensation for damage to his guitar – until he named and was ‘virally infected‘ by the youTube-Video which also got coverage in global traditional media (TV, Press). shamed the airline in a youTube video Next time an airline loses or breaks your luggage, try shaming them with a song and a video. That‘s what a little-known Canadian country and western singer did after he claimed that his Taylor acoustic guitar had been damaged by baggage handlers at Chicago‘s O‘hare airport last year. United Breaks Guitars has become a youTube sensation and provided Dave Carroll with the biggest hit of his career. The song - which chronicles his vain year-long attempt to win compensation from United – has had almost 4m hits on youTube and fans have been cla- mouring for the song at gigs where his band, Sons of Maxwell, has performed. (...)40 37 MSNBC,Docs seek gag orders to stop patients’ reviews <http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29497619> accessed on 05.03.2009 38 Slideshare, TBWA on Change 39 CPC Consulting, Internet überholt TV <http://www.cpc-consulting.net/Microsoft+Studie+Europe+logs+on--n795> accessed on 18.05.2009 40 The Guardian, United Breaks Guitars Video <http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/blog/2009/jul/23/youtube-united-breaks-guitars-video> accessed on 29.09.2009
  • 17. 2 - What does it mean to brands? THE TOP 100 31 * 2009 This is Google in Millward Brown Optimor’s BrandZ Top 100 ** ** TOP 100 Most Valuable Global Brands 2009 TOP 100 # Brand Brand Value % Brand Value # Brand Brand Value % Brand Value 09 ($M) Change 09 vs. 08 09 ($M) Change 09 vs. 08 1 100,039 16% 26 21,294 85% 2 76,249 8% 27 21,192 9% 3 * 67,625 16% 28 20,059 67% 4 66,622 20% 29 19,395 5% 5 66,575 34% 30 19,079 3% 6 63,113 14% 31 18,945 N/A 7 61,283 7% 32 18,233 N/A 8 59,793 -16% 33 17,965 -25% 9 53,727 45% 34 17,713 -8% 10 49,460 33% 35 17,467 -20% 11 41,083 19% 36 16,353 N/A 1997 This is Google at Stanford University 12 38,056 36% 37 16,228 -34% 13 35,163 -20% 38 16,035 10% 14 29,907 -15% 39 15,776 5% 15 27,842 -9% 40 15,499 -14% 16 27,478 100% 41 15,480 -53% 17 26,745 -9% 42 15,422 1% 18 23,948 -15% 43 15,076 7% 19 23,615 9% 44 ** 14,996 -3% 20 23,110 -3% 45 14,991 -9% 21 22,938 -1% 46 14,963 -40% 22 22,919 6% 47 14,961 -1% 23 22,851 4% 48 14,894 -22% ® 24 22,811 16% 49 14,608 -52% 25 21,438 -6% 50 14,571 -12% 17
  • 18. 2 - What does it mean to brands? 33 Don‘t be evil Contrary to a scientific ideal experiment, in the real world all variables are unlocked. In a changing economy and a changing media landscape the definition of a what a brand is has become the subject of countless discussions. Janice Capewell (Senior Marketing Manager, Leo Burnett Group)42 thinks that the old definiton of brands as landing points in which we follow our needs and invariably end up at a brand is changing. ‘The days of the static brands are increasingly numbered as they become a means and not an end. The brands of the future will be vehicles and not just destinations.’42 More and more companies understand that the important process of ‘brandbuilding’ is hap- pening on the side of the consumer. Jeremy Bullmore (Millward Brown) describes the role of marketing and design experts as ‘helping people to build brands as attractively as possible.’43 This understanding also leads into the three criteria ‘Innovation’, ‘Responsibility’ and ‘Com- munity’ of PSFK’s Good Brands Report listing ‘40 Brands that we can all learn from.’44 With a continuous closer integration of brands into peoples life behavioural economics (sug- Jeremy Bullmore gested reading: ‘Predictably Irrational’ by Dan Ariely, MIT Media Lab) are providing essential ChRis aNdeRsON (editor in Chief of wired magazine) market understanding as technical economics the focus of businesses is shifting from exclusi- vely monetary value to alternative currencies such as ‘Attention, Reputation and Network’43 The Long Tail 40 describes the niche strategy of mainly digital businesses. (Aradhana Goel, IDEO) which are drivers to success. If we look for example at the sales of Amazon.com or the iTunes Music Store we can see that companies are able to sell only small numbers of a large collection of unique items (Anderson calls this derivat of the Pareto Rule the Long Tail). Although using different paramaters for measuring brand value, there is wide consensus This is possible as the storing costs in the digital space approach zero.40 among reknown business rankings about which is the most powerful brand alive (i.e.: Mill- ward Brown Optimor’s BrandZ Top 100 43, Fast Company’s Fast50 46, PSFK’s Good Brands 44). In his current book Free 41 Anderson, who is sometimes called a ‘digital prophet‘ analyzes the importance of free products and Most awards for being leading in both innovation and market value are topped by Google services in today‘s economy and explains various models based around the price of $ 0.00. Here are three of the most important. which has developed ‘from a search engine to a way of life.’44 (Good Brands). ‘They are the provider of a vast array of services that enable work, play, learning and more.’44 Often Google + The freemium strategy which means that standard service is free but customers will be charged for is mentioned as the role model for the ‘ability to promote innovation among its staff’44 as well premium services. As an example a basic flickr account is free while a professional account will cost extra. as it includes the community (i.e. through beta-testing). This approach has made it become Aradhana Goel + One of the most succesful examples of the gift economy a greenhouse for fast experimentation with a culture of embracing failure. According to their (totally free and not for profit) is the open-source dictionary Wikipedia. motto ‘don’t be evil’47 accessibility and usefulness are at the heart of the customer experience. + The key to the financial success of Google is hidden inside its business strategy to ‘help people succeed and when they do so soes Google‘. Its diverse free services are built around pay-per-click advertising revenue which is continuously growing. 41 From the way Google is using the ‘negligible cost of distribution through the web’44 (p.32) in order to ‘expand into areas including health, telecom, software, news, and advertising,’44 companies can learn how people-centered communication devices can be designed into the products of a company. 40 Anderson C., The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More, Hyperion, New York, NY, United States of America, 2006 41 Anderson C., Free: The Future of a Radical Price, Hyperion, New York, NY, United States of America, 2009 42 YouTube, Leo Burnett Group Predictions 2009, Future Trends in Marketing <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4SklqUWXa4> accessed on 27.01.2009 43 Millward Brown Optimor, BrandZ Top 100 Ranking 44 PSFK, Good Brands Report 45 Aradhana Goel, IDEO, Presentation at IDEA 2008 Conference on 08.10.08, From Inidividuals to the Collective <http://www.slideshare.net/whatidiscover/from-individuals-to-the-collective-presentation> accessed on 17.08.2009 46 FastCompany, Fast 50 47 Wikipedia, Don‘t be evil <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don%27t_be_evil> accessed on 18.08.2009
  • 19. 2 - What does it mean to brands? 35 From designing products to designing brand experiences In an era of rapid cheap fabrication (described by MIT professior Neil Gershenfeld in his book FAB) which is filling with a exponential number of new products and services everyday, designer Matt Jones (Schulze&Webb) analyzes a post-digital dynamic which he calls the New Negroponte* Switch.48 ‘Services are becoming tangible products and products are becoming intangible services as fast production and pervasive networks are allowing them to switch places and mingle.’48 Among his examples for this theory are on the one side magazines that The Progression of economic value by Joseph Pine48 are printed from the data of blog posts, flickr shares and twitter feeds and on the other side illustrating the shift from products to services urban bikesharing and carsharing companies. If we understand the medieval markets as the birthplace of capitalism we can analyze four steps in the progression Philippe Starck, one of the most famous designers of the world foeresees that the profession of economic value through customization. (chart) The of a designer in its current nature will soon no longer be needed.49 writer Joseph Pine explains, that the commoditation of Philippe Starck services to goods creates a need for staging experiences Design will dissapear. There are two reasons: Design will melt into all kinds of projects or in today’s economy of mass-customization, ‘where con- processes that the term design becomes obsolet. The seperation of blueprint and produc- sumer sensitivity is reaching for authenticity.’48 tion is disappearing. Everything will be design, even more than it already is the case today. But there is also another reason why it will disappear: The history of our civilization shows that we are continually creating more powerful technologies and at the same time dissolve its materiality.49 This progress can be demonstrated if we compare the changes in size of computers. Starck goes on to say that ‘in a few years they might be integrated into our bodies as everything is getting smaller and is relocated to the internet. Maybe the role of a designer in the future is to Philippe starck: lOuis ghOsT be a personal trainer who is in charge of diet and gymnastics.’49 Starck who has designed an extraordinary wide range of Well, we should not expect to see the transition into this working style within the next years, objects is considered often as one of the most influential but the direction which Starck is talking about fits very well into our analysis about Moore‘s designers of the world. His famous Louis Ghost Chair for Law (p.17). As mentioned at the beginning of the first chapter everyone can access today Kartell is a dematerialising reinterpretation of a classical professional tools of creative expression. So what does it mean that ‘creativity has become a Louis XV. style furniture. commodity’50 (Alex Burgusky, Creative Head, Crispin Porter + Bogusky) to the creative in- dustry itself? Will advertising still be advertsing and will design still be design ? According to Tim Brown (IDEO) Design has become small.The term design has entered the lives of brands as a nametag symbolising ‘Ah! Exclusive!’ and is becoming ubiquitous part of the shopping ex- perience. But if we see three pairs of designer socks at Primark for 1.94£ we could ask ourself this question: Who did design my socks, if not a designer? We can see that the word design is finding itself falling into the same category as the word digital. 48 Gershenfeld N., FAB: The Coming Revolution on Your Desktop--From Personal Computers to Personal Fabrication, Basic Books, New York, NY, United States of America, 2007 49 TED, Joseph Pine, What consumers want, <http://www.ted.com/talks/joseph_pine_on_what_consumers_want.html> accessed on 04.02.2009 Jannis Kounellis Artist 47 50 seen in a video about the Artist, Tate Modern, London on 22.08.2009 51 Slideshare, The New Negroponte Switch <http://www.slideshare.net/schulzeandwebb/the-new-negroponte-switch> The material almost accessed on 19.07.2009 52 SZ Magazin, Philippe Starck, Dem Design fehlt Idealismus und Moral always leads to the immaterial. <http://sz-magazin.sueddeutsche.de/texte/anzeigen/28948> accessed on 19.07.2009 * Nicholas Negroponte is the author of 53 Slideshare, Creative Planning at Miami Ad School ‘being digital’. in this book which was al- <http://www.slideshare.net/theplanninglab/creative-planning-miami-ad-school> accessed on 24.09.2009 ready published in 1995 he explains that 54 TED, Tim Brown, Tim Brown urges designers to think big wired things will become unwired and <http://www.ted.com/talks/tim_brown_urges_designers_to_think_big.html> accessed on 02.10.2009 unwired things become wired) 55 Negroponte N., Being Digital, Vintage, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group (Vintage Series), New York, NY, 1996
  • 20. 3 FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 37 What helge Tennø Strategic Director, Screenplay 56 As the air around our citizens thickens with unwanted messages and interruptions, the goal should not be to add to the do the people unwantedness, but to create deliberate and appreciated value. want? 56 Slideshare, Helge Tennø, Post Digital Marketing 2009 <http://www.180360720.no/index.php/archive/post-digital-marketing-2009> accessed on 14.08.2009
  • 21. 3 - What do the people want? 39 2001 2009 This is the first iPod in This is what people feel about the iPod in
  • 22. 3 - What do the people want? 41 People are seeking the great experience of being alive Human beings do whatever they do based upon an expectation that their experience will be better for it. We work and strive to improve our lives for our families and ourselves. We want to make positive use of our time, to accomplish things large and small, to enjoy life and to relax. We want to make every day we can meaningful. And we want to enjoy the ride.58 (Robert Brunner and Stewart Emery in Design Matters) Through the rise of interactive media (from push to pull p.15), the democratisation of tools and channels, through the shift towards social media, brands and consumers are becoming same-leveled interlocuters. That is why the traditional language of marketing which includes many expressions of war (i.e. tactics, brief ) is in a process of transition. As the dictatorship of mass-media is fading away a new diplomatic marketing language is forming, reflecting on how to empower people who are looking for a great experience. The digital agency AKQA puts it into two formulas: 1) ‘Excite me or get lost.’59 2) ‘From interrupting to engaging.’59 Tim Brown In today‘s age of conversations, companies have to learn again that ‘marketing is not about selling stuff, but about giving participants a reason to buy stuff.’ 60 One step backwards. The most important interface between a company and people is the customer experience. To turn people into satisfied participants demands therefore a focus on its complete supply chain management. Just as brands can be considered platforms, products should be considered portals of experiences. If we analyze the success story of the iPod, we can see that the difference between a great product and a merely good product (Apple didn’t invent the mp3-player) is that ‚A great product embodies an idea that people can understand and learn about – an idea that grows in their minds, one they emotionally engage with.‘61 The starting concept of ‘1000 songs in your pocket’ and a continuous design-driven process of improving the product to be able to create value and play an intimate part in peoples live changed the perception of Apple. With its focus on a great design experience and its simple humanity it has built a strong indirect relationship to its customers which are connected on an emotional level. And it continues to do so by embedding ‘design thinking’63 (Tim Brown, IDEO) and process into everything they do. Apple is living the lifestyle in which it is belie- ving. Everyone is in charge of delivering a completely satisfying customer experience. Learning from a Lovemark like Apple means to understand their vi- sion, diligence and discipline that they have for the ‘soft stuff’62 (Sara DESIGN THINKING Tate, Strategy Director, Mother London) that people see, hear, smell and feel of your brand, as it is the lifeblood of the customer experi- Design Thinking can be described as a discipline LOVEMARKS ence. This corporate culture and the outcome of emotional bond to its that uses the designer’s sensibility and methods to customers, which is reducing the danger of ending up as a commodity match people’s needs with what is technologically Lovemarks transcend brands. They deliver beyond your expectations of great performance. Like great has helped the company overcome diverse mistakes (i.e.: the first gene- feasible and what a viable business strategy can con- brands, they sit on top of high levels of respect - but there the similarities end. Lovemarks reach your ration of iPods was only available for Mac). vert into customer value and market opportunity.63 heart as well as your mind, creating an intimate, emotional connection that you just can’t live without. Ever. Take a brand away and people will find a replacement. Take a Lovemark away and people will 57 protest its absence. Lovemarks are a relationship, not a mere transaction. You don’t just buy Lovemarks, Lovemarks - How Do I Know A Lovemark? <http://www.lovemarks.com/index.php?pageID=20020> accessed on 27.09.2009 58 you embrace them passionately. That’s why you never want to let go. Brunner R., Emery S., Hall R. Design Matters – How great design will make people love your company, Pearson Education Ltd, Harlow, United Kingdom, 2009, p.210 59 Presentation at AKQA, London on 25.03.2009 60 Put simply, Lovemarks inspire Loyalty Beyond Reason. Tennø, Post Digital Marketing 2009 (Kevin Roberts, CEO Worldwide of Saatchi & Saatchi) 57 61 Brunner R., Emery S., Hall R. p.7 62 Presentation at Mother, London on 06.07.2009 63 IDEO,Definitions of design thinking <designthinking.ideo.com/?p=49> accessed on 02.08.2009
  • 23. The difference between a great product and a merely good product is that it carries an idea.64 An idea that works inside a social, political and economical context and is based on human nature. 64 Brunner R., Emery S., Hall R. p.7
  • 24. WHAT ARE THE HUMAN FACTORS? 3 - What do the people want? 45 Rules for authentic communication The evolving challenges ‘from tangible to intangible, permanent to temporal and reactive to predictive’65 (Goel) require a shift of focus from the creative industry. Still empathy for indi- viduals should be in the heart of everything but it has also become essential ‘to get the pulse of the collective.’65 The human factors physical, cognitive, social, cultural, emotional and contextual can be seen as the micro-context while trend factors represent the macro context Physical Cognitive Social of society, technology and business. At the IDEA 2008 Conference Goel recommends going beyond the individual to the collective patterns and to ‘dig deep’ into trends to create me- aningful contexts for your brand.65 Tate describes that it is more important to create ‘rich ideas’66 than ‘big ideas.’66 If you analyze fashion brands like Gucci, you can see how they don’t put everything out at once, but have enough ‘to do it over the years.’66 The danger of big two dimensional ideas is that they tend to be thin while rich ideas are able to exist beyond the ‘communications’.66 Steven Spielberg The whole industry is obsessed with the idea of a simple message, endlessly repeated ... What people actually want is stuff with some complexity, some meat, some richness ... Not stuff that‘s distilled to a simple essence or refined to a single compelling truth. No-one ever came out of a movie and said ‚I really liked that. It was really clear. WHAT ARE THE TREND FACTORS? FACTORS? WHAT ARE THE TREND Emotional Cultural Contextual (Russel Davies, Strategist & Author)67 As a consequence of the information overload, for creators of com- SOCIETAL ARE THE TREND FACTORS? WHAT SOCIETALTECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY IDEA 2008 Conference 08.10.08 BUSINESS © mercial communication today the response of people is of greater im- portance than the message itself. That is why you should ask yourself TRENDS TRENDS ENABLERS TRENDS TRENDS ENABLERS the question: ‘What’s the emotion you want to leave people with?’ For SOCIETAL TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS example the movie director Steven Spielberg decides that he ‘wants to make a movie that makes people cry’ before he starts to work on it. For TRENDS ENABLERS TRENDS Advertising this means that ‘it is equally important to be interesting than to be right.’ 66 The only way to reach audiences is to create media SHIFTS IN SHIFTS IN STATE OF THE ART OF THE ART CHANGING THE that entertains, informs and engages. People are receptive to creative STATE CHANGING THE that matters to them as end users, stories that engage them as an au- CULTURAL CULTURAL VALUE EQUATION EQUATION VALUE dience and experiences that touch them.66 In Mother’s recent cam- LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE NEW POTENTIAL POTENTIAL NEW SHIFTS IN OPPORTUNITIES OF THE ART STATE EMERGING EMERGING THE CHANGING paign ‘Rubberduckzilla’ for Oasis they sensibly put many ‘little hooks’ CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES REVENUE MODELS EQUATION VALUE into the communications which have inspired people to react.58 Rubberduckzilla BEHAVIORALBEHAVIORAL REVENUE MODELS CHANGE LANDSCAPE PATTERNS OFNEW POTENTIAL CHANGE PATTERNS OF OPPORTUNITIES EMERGING When you compare Google’s way of using people for beta-testing with traditional focus groups BEHAVIORALADOPTION ADOPTION STAKEHOLDER STAKEHOLDER REVENUE MODELS you recognice that ‘embracing not only accepting’ sharing is much more powerful than trying CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS ECOSYSTEMSECOSYSTEMS to own.66 The international ‘post-advertising agency’ 68 Story Worldwide explains that ‘as you CHANGE PATTERNS OF BETWEEN DOMAINS DOMAINS BETWEEN STAKEHOLDER don’t own your brand any more, you can’t force people to listen to you.’69 (compare p.33 J. ADOPTION Bullmore) Additionaly as a content creator you should consider asking yourself ‘How are you CONNECTIONS ECOSYSTEMS genuinely contributing?’ more important than feeding people with empty bubbles. BETWEEN DOMAINS 65 Goel, From Inidividuals to the Collective 66 Mother, London 67 Slideshare, TBWA on Change 68 Story Worldwide <http://www.storyworldwide.com> accessed on 03.08.2009 IDEA 2008 Conference 69 08.10.08 IDEA 2008 Conference © Webinar Workshop by Story Worldwide, Narrative Approach to Story Listening & Measurement in Social Media on 19.08.2009 from New York 08.10.08 ©
  • 25. 4 FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 47 Bob Greenberg Chairman, CeO and Global Chief Officer, RGA61 Crisis. What What is happening to Detroit’s car companies right now will soon happen to the large global agencies. crisis? 70 Communication Arts, July/August 2009, Volume 51, Number 3, pdf, R/GA, A Profile <http://www.rga.com/#/section=inthenews/article=172> accessed on 15.09.2009
  • 26. 4 - Crisis. What crisis? 49 Dead men walking? ‘We‘re not in the business of keeping the media companies alive. We‘re in the business of connecting with consumers.’72 Trevor Edwards, Vice President of Global Brand Management, Nike. Today the creative industry has to embrace the changes in technology and society and ensure to brands that they can provide their customers with meaningful experiences. Although there are many different opinions what are the means that have to be taken there is consensus that the ‘mix of spents on communication’ has to be redefined along with ‘consumer engage- ment and creativity’73 (Mary Dillon, EVP and Global CMO, McDonalds). Brands are today not only looking for ‘adpeople that can tell you how to cut, but for evangelists that they can invest in.’73(Brian Perkins, EVP, Corporate Communication, J&J) Amir Kassaei (DDB Germany) one of the highest decorated Creative Directors of the world compares the speed of the changes in media and media behaviour with a ‘tsunami that comes from the blue’ and criticizes the deficient reaction of the creative industry.’74 CRITICISM OF RELIGION Amir Kassaei They don’t start to consider the consequences of this change of the world but tell their cli- Oliviero Toscani, the artist who became famous for his ents that they should not just do advertising in the traditional media (TV, Print) but in all campaign for Benetton in the 90s, complains about the kind of things, as you can not reach the people as easy as earlier. They are still thinking in current state of the advertising industry that it has nothing ‘old school advertising ideas’ with the only difference that the old ads now are running on- to do with the ‘conditio humana’. line as CRM-applications (Customer Relationship Managment) or as POS-posters (Point Analyzing it as the religion of capitalism, its iconography of Sale). That’s what then they call integrated communication trying to cover their lacking is not able to compare with for example the richness of authority and foresight. 74 the sistine chapel that tells stories reaching from heaven to hell. It has been trapped between production and con- Big parts of the creative industry (especially in cities like London and New York) have been sumption. ‘Real creatitivity is subversive’ but there is too hardly hit by the current recession. The need for effective creativity is bigger than ever at the much fear of the new and if it will work. This atmosphere same time as many budgets are tightened. Story Worldwide explains that social media ‘thre- of insecurity leads to the dominant mediocrity of com- atens to wreck everything’. 75 In a connected world where everything’s opt-in, ‘adjacency is mercial communication.71 ignored, interruption generates hostility and bad news can travel very fast traditional adver- tising is doomed.’75 Oliviero Toscani In its nature advertising and design as organs of commercial communication have never been about ‘l’art pour l’art’ but ‘art for the businesses sake’76 (Goodby Silverstin & Partner). Alt- hough many people argue that its past gained power in an age of mass-media dominance has led to an isolation from the people. That is why RGA’s Bob Greenberg expects that ‘what is happening to Detroit’s car companies right now will soon happen to the large global agencies.’ He explains that the revered Bernbach model (following page) is increasingly obsolete and that the ‘perfect storm’* which is now descending upon the marketing world ‘will wash away all those who don’t sprout gills and otherwise adapt.’77 *among other elements of this storm he is talking about the economic climate which is increasing the speed of expensive traditional advertising becoming irrelevant 71 Deutschlandfunk (German Radio), Art, Commerce and Culture, mp3 recording 72 Slideshare, TBWA on Change 73 Cannes Debate 2009 - How is the recession affecting the industry now and how will it shape its future? <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrSpsmlaShg> accessed on 27.06.2009 74 Brisanz ADC Festzeitschrift, Amir Kassaei, Nachruf auf die Werbung <http://brisanz.jimdo.com/amir-kassaei-die-zuk%C3%BCnftige-rolle-der-kreativen-elite> accessed on 20.08.2009 75 Story Worldwide, Narrative Approach to Story Listening & Measurement in Social Media 76 Goodby, Silverstein & Partners - Beliefs <http://www.goodbysilverstein.com/#/beliefs> accessed on 20.09.2009 77 Communication Arts, R/GA, A Profile
  • 27. THE BERNBACH MODEL78 Warren Berger describes the old model of advertising creativity in five points: 1) A great campaign revolves around ‘the big idea’ 2) Said big idea usually takes the form of a memorable line or perhaps a metaphorical story that somehow captures the essence of a brand 3) These big ideas are best generated by placing a copywriter and art director in a room together and forcing them to engage in a series of exchanges that typically begin with the words: ‘OK, what about this?’ 4) Upon coming up with the big idea, said creative people shall hand that idea off to various types of specialists (film producers, media buyers, digital techies) whose jobs are make sure it gets distributed in three or four media formats, with special emphasis on (ca-ching!) high-budget TV commercials 5) Handing off the ideas in this way is important because it enables the ‘creatives’ to get back to the really important stuff – dreaming up the next big idea 78 Communication Arts, R/GA, A Profile
  • 28. 4 - Crisis. What crisis? 53 Time for Titanium Investments in digital advertising which is today worldwide 13%79 of total adspent is expec- ted to grow rapidly as in the current economic climate companies are stepping back and ‘hit- ting the reset button.’80 (Marc Pritchard, Global Marketing Officer, P&G). Procter&Gamble the world’s biggest spender in communication is changing its structure. With Marc Pritchard now being both Chief Marketing and Chief Branding Officer advertising, media investment managment, design (including packaging design), market research and public relations are gathered in one department.80 In an interview at the Cannes Advertising Festival 2009 with Martin Sorrell (CEO of WPP, Worldwide) Pritchard explains that the reason behind this step is ‘to integrate all our brand- building activities.’ The expectation is to touch the life of consumers around the world much more quickly. Marc Pritchard ‘We’ve got great capabilities within the individual departments internally and agencies externally but what they need to be is to be better together. We are making structural changes to do that. On over 50% of our sales we have brand franchise leaders which are global in nature and integrate all the functions to get things done around the world. On over one third of the business the BAL - Model (Brand Agency Leader) is running. So we can integrate the agencies. Rather than briefing them individually, we can brief all of them together, so you can come up with integrated ideas and live them around the world. And now internally we are also integrating all of our disciplines because it creates speed and allows us to more rapidly build great ideas. It really comes down to and what we see increasingly as examples here at Cannes ‘the integrated creativity’. This is what we need. Those grand brandbuilding ideas that then we can integrate to consumer touchpoints and hOw is The ReCessiON aFFeCTiNg The iNdusTRy NOw aNd hOw will iT shaPe iTs FuTuRe? come together to create something which is larger in a whole than the individual pieces.80 This was the subject at the Cannes Debate 2009 with Mary Beth West, eVP & CMO, Kraft Foods; Marc And this is is one of the reason, the present and near future is seen by many people all over Sir Martin Sorrell Pritchard, Global Marketing Officer, P&G; Mary Dillon, eVP and Global CMO, McDonald’s Corporation the world (including the author) ‘as the most interesting time ever for advertising and design.’ and Brian Perkins, eVP, Corporate Communication, J&J was hosted by WPP’s CeO Sir Martin Sorrell ‘In an interconnected world, media is everywhere: ... The opportunities for value creation are greater than ever before – but we must expand our vision of what media is to begin realizing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrSpsmlaShg them. (Havas Media Lab).81 It is time for Titanium creative work ‘that does not follow exis- ting models, but sets trends’82 (Cannes Lions Category description). Seth Godin Author of Meatball Sundae: Is Your Marketing out of Sync? 81 New Marketing isn‘t a single event or website Seth Godin or technology. New Marketing treats every interaction, product, service and side effect as a form of media. 79 Media Convergence 80 Cannes Debate 2009 81 Slideshare, TBWA on Change 82 Cannes Lions, Titanium and Integrated Lions <http://www.canneslions.com/awards/categories.cfm?section_id=36> accessed on 26.06.2009
  • 29. 4 - Crisis. What crisis? 55 Silos and strawberries Along with the changing definitons of media, products, brands and communication the un- derstanding of what the job of the creative industries should be is changing. You have to know the market, products and brands better than your client. You have to anticipate the reaction of the competition. You should not surf on trends, but create new trends. You have to become a part of people’s life, enter their psychis and become indis- pensible to be succesful as a brand.83 (Amir Kassaei) Götz Ulmer In an interview Götz Ulmer84 (Executive Creative Director, Jung von Matt/Alster) describes a situation at a collective meeting of Unilever’s agencies ‘It is very dissapointing as 360° you will see that the Direct Marketing Agency will only bring DM-Ideas on the table, the Design Agency design-ideas and so one.84 Why in this Not long ago integrated 360° communication (the idea confrontation of business interests it is not that agencies have to create a communication soluti- probable that a true media-neutral solution on for every existing media) had been the goal that all will be established is easy to understand. companies were running after. But with the exponential growth of social media and the constant birth of new Advertising can no longer rely on what media channels as a result of technological progress (i.e. has worked before (Paul Arden describes the mobile evolution) this target seems not only impos- that 90%85 of Ads are inspired by other Ads). sible to achieve but also ineffective from a business per- It has to open its doors to establish a fresh spective. Instead of taking the same advertising message creative culture in a time where innovation to everyone it is considered smarter to tailor messages in communication is more needed than ever. around specific target audiences and provide an enga- ging brand plattform. So the question is no longer ‘What should the communication say?’83 and push this message but ‘What should the communication achieve?’83 Scott Donaton AdAge 86 Forget above the line 360° The dilemma of marketing departments and specialist agencies: and below the line. You can be certain that if you ask a strawberry seller Forget lines. Forget silos. for the recipe of a great cake to impress your friend Forget competing disciplines and the eternal scrap he will recommend you a strawberry cake. for what they view as their rightful share of the almighty dollar.... To truly move forward, many of those models will have to be torn down and rebuilt. But maybe your friend doesn‘t like strawberries. 83 Amir Kassaei, Nachruf auf die Werbung 84 Götz Ulmer, Executive Creative Director, Jung von Matt/Alster Hamburg, interviewed on 30.06.2009 in Hamburg 85 Arden P., It‘s Not How Good You Are, It‘s How Good You Want to Be, Phaidon Press, London, United Kingdom, 2003, p. 6 86 Anomaly, Why we exist <http://www.anomalynyc.com/another/why.php> accessed on 23.02.2009
  • 30. À Manoeuvres Manoeuvres Á Â ÈÉÊËÌÍÎÏ RHBKQNHR THBKQBHR Ã R/ga RaPP Ä Analyzing the R/GA agency model we can Manoeuvres see that they first reintegrated media into Rapp, one of the major international agencies focusing on Direct Marketing is Å their setup and added analytics on the strategic side. Within their creative model reinventing itself. With the shifting focus of its work towards Customer Relationship RHBKWBHR the old art director + copywriter teams was replaced by the disciples of interac- Management the company is adopting to bbh, Kolle Rebbe tion design, copywriting, visual design and people’s changing financial, meda, shop- Manoeuvres BBh set up an independent company within technology at the bottom of everything. The ping and buying behaviour on- and offline. services that the agency offers includes their network by the name of ZAG, which in its new mission statement the agency is RHBKQNHR focuses on brand innovation. Analyzing the market they are constantly looking for gaps among others applications (i.e. Nike+), Brand Design (i.e. Nokia viNe) but also offering ‘emotional creative that demands CP+b & daddy, saPieNT & NiTRO digitalize Retail (i.e. Club Nokia).95 action’ and ‘action that can be measured’. to fill with products and brands launched in its internal logic is based on data that lead cooperation with production and distributi- Analyzing the changing nature of commer- on partners. 91 to insights which inspire creativity. As the cial communication and its ‘factories’ the gathered data can be measured in real- shift towards online advertising and web time, the agency can quickly adjust brand Following the same business strategy the design is changing the industrial lands- advertising agency Kolle Rebbe‘s plant experiences strategically.87 cape. There is a trend of big networks ac- quiring digital ‘hotshops’ (an industry word company KOReFe has won many international design awards. 92 Manoeuvres for innovative boutique to middle-sized (150 people) agencies). RHBLQBHR One of the most discussed recent examples aNOMaly is Crispin Porter + Bogusky (USA) which turned the swedish interactive agency Manoeuvres Daddy into CP+B europe and by that hopes Manoeuvres Anomaly bills itself very clearly as a new model agency. it describes itself as a to enhance its global indluence in the share response to the notion that the old agency RHBKWBHR of the digital market.89 RJBKQBHR models ’are all broken’ and ’the traditio- nal solutions are becoming less and less dROga5 Maybe even more interesting was the press JuNg vON MaTT effective’. Quoting campaign magazine its release on July 1st 2009 informing that positioning sounds like a bunch of cliches, At the age of only three years, droga5 Sapient (a global digital service firm) is to The agency is reallocating the staff of its because so many agencies are talking (New york, USA and Sydney, Australia) acquire the young but highly succesful (i.e. digital subagency JvM/next into the other about the need to re-gear their approach has made its way energized by the power Best Job in the World) NitroGroup which subagencies. With the established mix of around the same principles: ideas-led, and speed of digital progress and is combines communications with business disciplines the agency is able to offer more media-neutral, integrated, multi-discipli- already considered as one of the most strategy, digital innovation and branded holistic communication solutions.93 nary. Anomaly, though, launched with these best agencies worldwide. entertainment.90 principles at its core.96 By acquiring two creative agencies in The agency focuses on business sustaina- Poland (Grandes Kochones) and the Czech bility by positioning itself as ‘an advertising Republic (Kaspen) the german/austrian/ agency for companies of the 21st centu- swedish independent network is improving ry’.88 Droga5 was the first agency to win its performance for international clients two Black Pencils at this year‘s DandAD. and emerging markets.94 87 Rapp <http://rapp.com/home> accessed on 02.03.2009 88 Droga5 <http://www.droga5.com> accessed on 13.03.2009 89 93 Crispin Porter + Bogusky <http://www.cpbgroup.com> accessed on 20.09.2009 Ulmer, Jung von Matt/Alster 90 94 Sapient - Press Release <http://www.sapient.com/en-us/news/Press-Releases/a1024.html> accessed on 20.06.2009 Jung von Matt, News <http://www.jvm.com/de/news> accessed on 25.09.2009 91 95 ZAG <http://www.zaginvention.com> accessed on 28.02.2009 RGA, Our Model <http://www.rga.com/#/section=offering/article=109> accessed on 15.09.2009 92 96 KOREFE <http://www.kolle-rebbe.de/de/agentur/korefe> accessed on 30.03.2009 Anomaly <http://www.anomalynyc.com/> accessed on 23.02.2009
  • 31. 5 FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 59 igor Stravinsky Composer 97 What is our I don‘t write music. I invent it. job? 97 Arden P., p. 28
  • 32. 5 - What is our job? 61 From to ‘Product ‘Marketing Marketing’ Products’
  • 33. 5 - What is our job? 63 Making clients succeed through strategic creativity What is needed in a world of communication where the customer journey has evolved from an unerring small setup of media into a fast growing cloud of potential touchpoints (accor- ding to the motto: ‘Everything is media.’) is not only a discussion between the instruments, but an effective orchestration of communication which is only commited to the end result. Some forerunning agencies, such as Anomaly (New York) have therefore chosen their strategy of working as creative business consultants. As their remuneration is based on a profit-share model companies can expect, that they will give what is best for their client and not only sell what they have in stock and as much of it as possible. The focus has to shift from the commu- Eco:Drive nication to the solution as traditional ‘advertising ideas don’t have the momentum of surprise and persuasion to break through the accustomed grid. And they don’t have the strength to AKQA and Fiat developed a system that connects your car to a PC. move people and markets.’99 Today agencies are less wanted to come up with standard com- The software helps you to reduce CO2 emmisions and improve your munication products (‘one 30-second TV-Spot and three Press-Ads, please.’) so they have to fuel efficiency by analyzing your driving style and giving advise. develop a culture which thrives holistic understanding of brand problems. helge Tennø The offer of agencies should therefore not end in just communications (as for many pro- blems communication might not be the right answer) but ‘represent a think tank which The Great Schlep combines the competency and solid analysis of a consultant with and the intuitive strength of creativity to generate solutions that are fresh, innovative and targeted. This can be Droga5 targeted the grandchildren of elderly Jews in Florida to visit their everything from the development of sales platforms and products to efficiency programs, grandparents in Florida to convince them they should elect Obama. further education or the discovery of new fields of business and market opportunities.’99 With a website including an online shop and viral videos featuring comedy star Sarah Silverman, the Great Schlep received 34298 million media im- The social media revolution is described with the title of Clay Shirky‘s book ‘Here comes pressions, as it was also reported on traditional media. Obama received the everyone.’100 Everyone is on the same level in the contemporary democraticed media setting. highest percentage of Florida’s Jewish voters in a presidential election in 30 To find out which kind of people will be able to direct brands in the future we have to look Michael hoinkes years, and won Florida by 3 percentage points. beyond job titles. As ‘creativity has been commoditised’ (p.35), Michael Hoinkes (Creative Director, Hamburg) describes that ‘those who think become indispensable.’101 People show high acceptance for contribution of brands in social media (although it is meant to be their private space for discussions) if they ignite conversations instead of interrupting them. That is why brands need to fundamentaly understand that ‘social media in its core is not a technology but means ‘talking, discovering and building relationships.’102 98 Titanium Lions, The Great Schlep <http://work.canneslions.com/titanium/?award=22#> accessed on 26.06.2009 99 Amir Kassaei, Nachruf auf die Werbung 100 Clay Shirky, Here comes everyone <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_0FgRKsqqU> accessed on 24.09.2009 101 Michael Hoinkes (freelance Creative Director) interviewed on 31.06.2009 in Hamburg 102 Tennø, Post Digital Marketing 2009
  • 34. 5 - What is our job? 65 The Best Job in the World Nitro created an open online competition for ‘Tourism of Queensland, Australia’ to become an island caretaker at the Great Barrier Reef. Additionally it had the offer in job adver- tisements of newspapers internationally. This brilliant creative strategy caused a mass participation in the competition and increased the global awareness and desira- blity of the tourist destination Queensland. Friend Fatigue As a part of their ‘Whopper Sacrifice’ campaign CP+B created a Facebook application that gave a voucher for a whopper to every participant who sacrificed 10 Facebook friends for it. This highly succesful application can be seen as an innovati- ve cultural interpretation of the behaviour and need of Burger King‘s Online Target Group. After ruining more than 200.000 friendships the tool was stopped by Facebook but continued to be the content of many brand conversations.
  • 35. 5 - What is our job? 67 A new way of working One of the aspects the impact of digital is having on our life is convergence. In a multi-media age unique combinations of media mixes are becoming part of our reality just like the alpha- bet. Commercial communication is always trying to expand its territory into unused settings and expressions. Technological progress leads to cultural innovation and for brands this means new stages to perform. The agencies ebracement of co-creativity is therefore a natural reac- tion to generate innovative, surprising and engaging communication solutions. Stefan Walz (Creative Director Digital, Kolle Rebbe) imagines the future of his job as an ‘interdisciplinary director’103 cooperating with people from diverse backgrounds who interact on projects just like a movie is produced. These casts will include much more sorts of creative and strategic people than art directors, copywriters and planners. Behavioural scientists, directors, designers, architects, authors, Dominic Veken philosophers, music editors, ... The team that is coordinated through interdisciplinary direction will depend very much on the project.103 Honeybees Poem Reading The work on such kind of creativity demands other cooperation with the companies. ‘Agency Goodby, Silverstein and Partners convinced Häagen-Dasz Scholz&Friends did adbreaks in the form of poetry at a literature people will have to spend more time in the client‘s kitchen.’104 (Götz Ulmer) With the digital to start an initiative of helping honeybees as they under- event to promote specific Doppelherz Products (Senior Health Care) opportunites and the demand for rich ideas the timing of communications has to be adjus- stood that if the bees died, so would HD. with very high success within the elderly target group. ted. There will be no more ‘we need this campaign in three weeks time.’104 and at the same http://www.helpthehoneybees.com/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbPn7U3TlhQ time ‘but we had a refreshment of our packaging design only 5 years ago.’104 ‘The people don’t differenciate when building a brand in their impressions between packaging and poster and we shouldn’t either. Since I am working, I have never understood the line bet- ween design and advertising.’103 (Walz) As brands are requiring the strongest communication iFood that they can get, (see P&G, p.53) the creative industry needs to create strong and lasting brand strategies that open doors for short term creative applications in many forms. It is con- Genex built an iPhone application for Kraft Foods as part of their sidered more appropriate to create ecosystems around people then to craft message-oriented strategy ‘Food and Family’ that people could buy for 0,99$ (they campaigns. The line between culture and commerce has never been smaller as the media par- made money out their advertising) that serves as a platform around ticipants long for experiences and entertainment that stand out of the crowd. recipes. The shopping list for the recipes include Kraft Products. Analyzing the global restructurisation and rebrandings of all sorts of agencies we can see how the understanding is spreading that ‘holistic brandbuilding’ can only be achieved in a collec- tive of companies open to innovative ideas ‘from everyone’, that embrace change and partner with cooperating experts. Almost everywhere you look in the industry, you can notice agenci- es endeavouring to change their culture and reposition themself (i.e. TBWA Advertising turns into TBWA Media Arts Lab) as old models seem to run out of date (Rapp: the model is ‘there are no models’105 DDB: ‘don‘t follow rulebooks, follow playbooks’106). The only constant is: You have to put people in the centre and tailor communications around them. To ensure that brands reach and touch people today agencies have to look from different per- spectives and have to go deeper into psychology and anthropology finding out what fascinates them. Modern planning has to consider ‘themographics’ higher than ‘demographics’103 (Do- minic Veken, Director of Planning, Kolle Rebbe) and study people’s motives, their situations and their behaviour. 103 Stefan Walz, Creative Director, Kolle Rebbe, interviewed on 28.06.2009 in Hamburg 104 Ulmer Jung von Matt/Alster 105 Rapp 106 DDB, How we do it <http://www.ddb.com> accessed on 24.09.2009
  • 36. 5 - What is our job? 69 From shouting to being helge Tennø Strategic Director, Screenplay 107 In an age of too much information and digital empowerement the nature of commercial com- munication is changing from telling to engaging. Rather than pushing mesages about pro- It‘s not about technology. ducts on traditional media-channels it seems more advanced to create own platforms, services or products which serve as brand advertising. If we analyze the recent work of forerunning It‘s about technologies immersion digital-oriented agencies such as AKQA and R/GA and compare it with work of innovative ‘traditonal’ agencies such as Crispin Porter + Bogusky or Goodby Silverstein & Partners, we into everyday life which is is giving us can see stong approachments. As the mass-media dominance is coming to an end and at the same time the market offer is more complex than ever ‘ideas have to work back to the store’109 access to people in a completely different way. (Marc Pritchard, P&G) The need for different communications in order to create revenues for Nick Law their clients and the evolving technological possibilities are changing the business for the crea- tive industry. Today advertising and design are more and more often working closely together in order to create products that are portals to brands with communication in its DNA. (in biblical language: ‘the stones cry out’110). This is what the author describes as the shift from Nike+ The Human Race product marketing to marketing products. R/GA came up with the idea to host the largest one-day running Nick Law (Chief Creative Officer, R/GA) writes in Advertising Age111: event in history based on the technology of Nike+. Nearly 800,000 participants representing 142 countries came together, both phy- Instead of asking ‘How do we break through?’ advertisers should be asking ‘How do we fit sically and virtually, to challenge and inspire each other, and raise in?’ If your audience is on Facebook, don‘t interrupt their social life by shouting at them; money for some charities. (i.e. Livestrong)108 find a way to insinuate your brand into their existing behavior. Burger King did it when Mike Arauz Nike iD it realized people with ‘friend fatigue’ would gladly sacrifice 10 friends for a Whopper. On another hand, if your audience is made up of runners who like to run with music, put a R/GA developed an application which allows you to create your sensor in their shoe that connects to their iPod and then to a network of runners around own pair of Nike shoes. The system which runs online, in stores and the world and call it Nike Plus. Or, if your audience is already searching the web for coo- even on outdoor media is now in its second generation. It can be king ideas, do what Kraft did and give them a ‘Food and Family’ digital magazine and seen as a forerunning innovation for commercial communication in iPhone app full of inspiration, recipes and tools. an age of mass-customization and brand experiences. At first glance, these examples are very different. The first is a singular utility that attaches itself to an existing platform. The second is a product extension with its own robust plat- form. The third is a platform that delivers deep content and utility. What they have in common, however, is they are useful and social, and have been wildly popular because they blend into people‘s media habits. They fit in.111 Helge Tennø describes that it‘s not the enormousness of the operation or the extreme effort that went into it, that makes the Nike+ such a brilliant representative for the future of marke- ting, branding and advertising, but ‘it‘s their focus on truth and human dynamics, as opposed to preconceived ideas and technological mechanics.’107 With the changing media landscape marketing has to switch from the old currency of attention to new currencies which are about creating appreciated value in peoples‘ life. One of the timeless rules of marketing is to simply give people what they want. If we look at it from the people-perspective, we have to create brands that are like people that we respect, like or love - fascinating, trustworthy and enga- ging. Mike Arauz states ‘If I tell my Facebook friends about your brand, it’s not because I like your brand but rather because I like my friends.’107 107 Tennø, Post Digital Marketing 2009 108 Media-Lions, The Human Race <http://work.canneslions.com/media/entry.cfm?entryid=19675> accesed on 26.06.2009 109 Cannes Debate 2009 110 Luke 19,40<http://www.bibleserver.com/index.php> accessed on 01.10.2009 111 Advertising Age, Marketers: Think About Fitting in Before Breaking Through <http://adage.com/digitalnext/article?article_id=139155> accessed on 25.09.2009
  • 37. FROM ‘ThiS iS iT’ TO ‘heRe i AM’ 71 Conclusion In the past five chapters the author has covered a journey which zoomed in from a sociological analysis of the digital impact to its importance for the world of creating products and their marketing. As we dissected how the empowerement of today’s consumers changes the way that they build brands we realize the current challenges of the creative industry. Following an old chinese saying that every crisis presents an opportunity,113 we can hope to look forward to witness a redefinition of our task as people demand matching authentic voices in order to connect. Adrian van Hooydonk114 (Head of Design, BMW) explains: Life has become more about experiences than about collecting things. As the customers think longer and harder about what they buy, we have to think longer and harder about what we create. I think there has to be a better story around it. Things that people then can also experience as they live with the product.114 Consumers are people. Brands are people. It is time for us as the creative industry as well to consider ourselves as people and Sir isaac Newton Mathematician and Physicist 112 find our place within context of society which is shifting from ‘This is it’ to ‘Here I am’. The more the drive towards holistic understanding is flurishing, the less people are considering themselves as functions and consequently just playing their parts. Men build too many walls Ellen J. Langer115 (Psychologist, Harvard University) illustrates the need for ‘Mindfulness’ in compelling ways. In one story and not enough bridges. she reports about a women who when being asked why she habitually cuts off a piece of the meat before putting the roast in the oven answered ‘Because my mother always did that.’ When the psychologist later interviewed the mother she found out that when the women was a child, her mother had an oven which was simply to small for a whole roast. The potential of each employee in the creative industry is that he or she can do a job that a machine can’t. If we identify ‘mindlessness’114 (Veken) as an obstacle we are less likely to remain in models that are threatened by extinction as we can see at the example of Bob Greenberg and RGA.116 It is important to understand the past in order to be prepared to shape the future but ‘it is not recommendable to fight with the same sword as Bill Bernbach (1911 – 1982, a genius of advertising who developed creative rules that have mostly endured for six decades) in a battle of automatic guns.’117 (Johannes Hermann) The famous aphorism ‘If it works, it‘s obsolete.’118 by Marshall McLuhan (1911 – 1980) and ‘Change is the only constant.’119 by Heraclitus of Ephesus (c.535 BC - 475 BC) are therefore good ways to describe the nature of the marketing industry in general. Focusing on people we constantly have to question and adapt our way of working along with the mutating environ- ment. It is like buying clothes for a little child. Generally you buy them one size bigger, as you need to think for the future if you don‘t want to waste money. To create brand communication that stands out of the information overload in an age of commoditized creativity we should therefore no longer look at the walls between competing disciplines but as ‘T-shaped people, who can ignite conversations’ (Ian Haworth, Rapp)120 build bridges to enable synergy. Learning from Obama’s cam- paign we should create valuable fractals of rich ideas that create something which is bigger than the sum of them’121 because You don‘t love things because they are pretty, but because they carry an own world inside and the bigger this world is, the more you fall in love.122 (Meike Rosa Vogel, Songwriter) 112 GoodReads.com < http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/show/105991> accessed on 16.9.2009 113 Crisis & Opportunity <http://www.haikudesigns.com/crisis-opportunity-print.htm> accessed on 04.10.2009 114 Monocle, Adrian van Hooydonk, designing cars to suit the times <http://www.monocle.com/sections/design/Web-Articles/Adrian-van-Hooydonk> accessed on 03.10.2009 115 Veken D., Ab jetzt Begeisterung – Die Zukunft gehört den Idealisten, Murmann Verlag, Hamburg, Germany, 2009, p.236-243 116 Communication Arts, R/GA, A Profile 117 Johannes Hermann, Graphic Designer, interviewed on 29.09.2009 at High Wycombe 118 Wired, Interview with Marshall Mc Luhan, Channeling McLuhan <http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/4.01/channeling_pr.html> accessed on 28.09.2009 119 Wikipedia, Heraclitus <http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Heraclitus> accessed on 15.03.2009 120 Ian Haworth, Chief Creative Officer, Rapp Worldwide, interviewed on 20.07.2009 in London 121 Cannes Lions 2009, Press Conference Titanium and Integrated Lions 122 Deutschlandfunk (German Radio), On Stage, Maike Rosa Vogel, 02.10.2009, 21.05, < http://www.dradio.de>
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