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Planning 2010 4As deck
 

Planning 2010 4As deck

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A digital planner's take on the changing landscape of idea architecture - presented to the IAAS 4As Boston

A digital planner's take on the changing landscape of idea architecture - presented to the IAAS 4As Boston

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    Planning 2010 4As deck Planning 2010 4As deck Presentation Transcript

    • Hello. 1
    • Who is IN THE ROOM? Creatives Planners Production Technology Media Account 2
    • We are ALL creative “Not how intelligent you are… but how you are intelligent.” “Not how creative you are… but how you are creative.” Sir Ken Robinson on culture and creativity 3
    • What is PLANNING? 4
    • What is planning? Planning is a way of doing something, it is a discipline if not a department Planning does not just play a role in advertising Great planning can happen in the absence of someone called a “planner” 5
    • We need to solve the issues with a clear point of view What is the business problem? What do people currently think about our brand? What is our idea? How are our communications going to help? Who are we going to have a conversation with? What do we know about them? Where are the best places to have a conversation? 6
    • The founders of planning in the 1970s had different means but the same end The Goal: Create consistent vehicle for consumer insights to be heard Stephen King, JWT: Stanley Pollitt, BMP: The answer is a new process The answer is a new person 7
    • The Client The Creatives Account Management ? 8
    • The Client The Creatives Account Management Consumers: attitudes, values and behaviors Trends: Macro/Micro Insights through intuition and research 9
    • The classic planning cycle Where do we want Where are we? to be? Are we getting How do we get there? there? 10
    • Planning helps create CONNECTION & RELEVANCE It makes me feel (emotional)_______. It is useful to me because (rational)_______. It fits my lifestyle because (associations)________. 11
    • Discover RELEVANCE through insight CULTURE Insight CULTURAL MACRO ANTHROPOLOGY TRENDS SELF ATTITUDES LIFESTYLE VALUES MIND TRIBES SYMBOLS EMOTION COGNITION BEHAVIOR BELIEFS LIFESTAGES SOCIAL DEMOGRAPHICS PSYCHOLOGY 12
    • Creative Brief Target Writer Audience Expert Social Information Anthropologist Center Brainstorm Facilitator Planning Futurologist Data Analyst Media/Comm. Planner Market Researcher Strategic Focus Group Thinker Moderator 13
    • So what’s CHANGED? 14
    • We (all of us) do not just work in advertising. WE HELP SOLVE BUSINESS PROBLEMS. Advertising, alone, doesn’t solve all the problems clients face. 15
    • The Ad Agency was founded during a time when advertising sold product. When sharing a creative idea was powerful enough to get people to buy. When consumers had limited media choices and were impressionable. 16
    • We have all arrived at the inevitable crossroads. 17
    • In one day, an average individual will: See 2,904 media messages Pay attention to 52 Read, listen or watch 24 Dislike 14 Positively remember only 4 18
    • Top-of-mind Awareness The old model of Of Aware, PERSUASION is not Excellent Opinion working as well as it Of Aware, used to. Definite Consideration Of Considered Shopped within 1 year: Purchased 19
    • Consumer decision-making is a non-linear, fragmented process. Radio Video Direct Mail Print s Awareness Express Intent Blog Positive Opinion Educate, Evaluate & Experience Consideration Purchase Purchase New Old 20
    • We need to rethink the purchase funnel Top-of-mind Awareness Of Aware, Excellent Opinion Of Aware, Learn Shop Buy Use Definite Consideration Of Considered Shopped within 1 year: Purchased Persuade Influence “think and remember us” “inspire behavior” 21
    • And our past proven methods are not consistently convincing audiences to consider and buy our product Unique Selling Prop Positioning ? Taglines Reasons to Believe Storytelling Visual Creativity “Talk to” “Talk with” 22
    • As marketers, we need to rethink how we make people want. REINFORCE MEMORY “Talk to” Persuade ? “think and remember us” OR Influence “inspire behavior” DEVELOP RELATIONSHIP “Talk with” 23
    • There is HOPE. But without one “code” for success. ADVERTISING is only part of the solution. Not THE solution. 24
    • DESIGN THINKING is a new way of solving business problems. 25
    • DESIGN THINKING is… “an approach that uses the designer’s sensibility and methods for problem solving to meet people’s needs in a technologically feasible and commercially viable way. In other words, design thinking is human-centered innovation.” —Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO 26
    • LESS “say” MORE “do” Stimulate DIALOGUE and ACTIVITY between people and brands 27
    • Start creating advocates rather than just customers SOURCE: David Armano, Logic & Emotion Blog 28
    • As a design thinker… What are we DOING to stimulate customer behavior. What is our brand act? 29
    • Which had a bigger impact on acquiring new AT&T customers? Unique Selling Proposition Brand Act 30
    • What are brand acts? Ask yourself what if… 1.  Household cleaning didn’t use harmful chemicals? 2.  You could carry 1000 songs in your pocket? 3.  A shoe, a device and a website could inspire a global running race? 31
    • So how do we use DESIGN THINKING? 32
    • 1.  Identify THE ISSUE 2.  Discover THE IDEA 3.  Architect the SOLUTION 33
    • 1. Identify THE ISSUE (Not just the symptom) 34
    • A client will approach an agency with a problem that often is a symptom rather than the issue. Why are sales flat? Why is our market share declining? How can we launch this new and unknown product? Why are people not considering us? Who else can we target to improve sales? How do we gain more top-of-mind awareness? Why are we not retaining repeat buyers? 35
    • And we need to help our clients understand what the underlying issue is that is causing their problem THE PROBLEM: Sales of the newly redesigned Saturn cars and crossovers are not meeting volume objectives. THE ISSUE: Although many have positive memories of the Saturn brand from the 1990s and its “different” philosophy, most do not know the new Saturn and are unaware of the stylish and thoughtfully designed cars and crossovers now available at retailers. Many still associate the brand with small, plastic and less expensive cars that don’t meet their current needs or reflect an image they would like to express about themselves. And as a result, are not considering the brand when making a purchase decision. The brand has gone from being “different” to “indifferent” and lost it’s “people first” philosophy. 36
    • Insight into the issue can come from anywhere Brand Category Trends Product INSIGHT Retail Points of Contact Company The Consumer 37
    • And to define the ISSUE we have to ask questions Who is buying from us? Who isn’t? How do people buy us? Are we making it easy for people to find us? Who is are direct and indirect competition? Who is stealing our market share? Who are What do our audiences currently think of we taking from? us? Are we starting a conversation with the right What’s our competition doing? How are audience? they gaining or losing share? Where is the low hanging fruit? Who are our What does our brand stand for? Is it known aspirational buyers? by our audiences or is there a disconnect? Do we suffer from low top-of-mind awareness? What marketing/advertising is working and what is not? What and how are the macro-issues (economy, changes in tastes/needs, Are we part of the consideration set? trends, etc.) affecting our problem? Where do we rank? 38
    • WHY THE ISSUE MATTERS? If we don’t define the RIGHT issue, we end up trying to solve the wrong problem 39
    • And when you totally overlook “the issue” you get…. 1985 - The cola wars 40
    • 2. Discover the IDEA Define the AUDIENCE Uncover the true INSIGHT Craft an IDEA 41
    • 2. Discover the IDEA Define the AUDIENCE Uncover the true INSIGHT Craft an IDEA 42
    • Define the AUDIENCE/PARTICIPANTS Current or competitive users? Lapsed brand users? Get same people to use more? Get new people to start using? Is there more than one audience? Is there a defined mindset? IT ALL DEPENDS… Who has the biggest impact on solving the ISSUE? 43
    • What it is not Women 25-44 with household incomes over 100k (This tells us nothing and designed for buying media) What it is Progressive Gen X/Y women are looking for brands that understand their everyday lives. Many feel they are in the middle of everything, from their careers to raising a family, to time for themselves. For them, the world has become a hyperlife mash-up of days events and to-do lists. “Every day” has become a blend between have-tos and want-tos. But unlike the “soccer mom” of the past, GenX/Yers want to live life the way it should be, on their terms, not from the pressures of others deciding how they should live. And those terms are different for everyone. Enjoying every day is about customizing their experiences and above all, creating moments to smile, laugh and love. 44
    • Think about… Why do people buy products in this category? Mutual Funds Beer How do people buy products in this category? What drives brand choice? What are the barriers to purchase? Athletic Footwear Cars 45
    • Determine Priorities The quest for the “lowest hanging fruit” Don’t try and change the world without plugging the leaking bucket. 46
    • What is a mindset? 47
    • 2. Discover the IDEA Define the AUDIENCE Uncover the true INSIGHT Craft an IDEA 48
    • Uncover the TRUE INSIGHT “Insights are observations about life. They are a little like stolen moments, fleeting forays into real life, revelations of the way people think or behave.” -Jean Marie Dru, Disruption, TBWA 1. PROFOUND 2. UNIQUE 3. COMPELLING HUMAN TRUTH TRUE INSIGHT is a catalyst for creative ideas that inspire consumer behavior AND solve business problems 49
    • And TRUE INSIGHT can come from anywhere Segmentation Decision-making Influencers process Industry Retail experience trends Product INSIGHT Psychology benefits Cognitive Emotional Tracking Brand studies perceptions Competitors Cultural influence Macrotrends 50
    • WHAT IS THE INSIGHT? 51
    • WHAT IS THE INSIGHT? 52
    • HOW CAN YOU FIND INSIGHT? EXAMPLES OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH Ethnographies Long-term observational research performed in consumers home/work/real life Man-on-street interviews Semi-legalized harassment of innocent bystanders in + malls, street corners or retailers In-home interviews Intuition Often 1:1 interviews semi-structured around (how does what I learned solve the issue) conversation of attitudes, beliefs and behaviors Online Dialogue/Social media Monitoring of conversations online often reveal great insight into the challenges and opportunities of a brand and category 53
    • TRUE INSIGHT is not limited to consumer insight Segmentation Decision-making Influencers process Industry Retail experience trends Product INSIGHT Psychology benefits Cognitive Emotional Clients Tracking Brand studies perceptions Competitors Cultural influence Macrotrends 54
    • The Creative Brief Not going to spend time talking about how to craft a brief as every agency does this differently. But a few thoughts… 1.  Brief. No more than 2 pages - preferably 1 2.  Creative. Words and the 5 senses. 3.  Concise. Clearly states the issue we are trying to solve and identifies audience/participant mindset 4.  Strategic. An articulation of how we can solve the issue. It may be the idea or a way to frame the idea. A main message. A brand act. 5.  And finally, it should be agriculture for great creativity. Make sure there is a true insight articulated in your brief. 55
    • 2. Discover the IDEA Define the AUDIENCE Uncover the true INSIGHT Craft an IDEA 56
    • Crafting the IDEA “What we need is channel belief, not agnosticism, ideas that embrace media and help shape which channels to use, which not to use, and how to use them.” -Mark Beeching, Global Chief Creative Officer, Digitas 57
    • Make people DO not just THINK 58
    • The Nike+ Human Race a global a simultaneous 10k race held on 8/31/08 around the world. Over 1 million participated at events in 25 cities 59
    • The IDEA was an IPod, a running shoe and a global digital strategy to connect, share and distribute 60
    • From an insight, The IDEA should stimulate brand momentum IDEA SPREADABLE - something you’d want to pass along to others WEARABLE - affinity toward a brand INSIGHT IDENTIFIABLE - represents what a brand stands for in our minds MEMORABLE - stands apart from everything else MODULAR - many components, each with a purpose that fit together to form the idea 61
    • From
CAR
SHOPPERS
to
STORYTELLERS
to
AGENTS
 Everyone
has
a
story
to
tell.

The
Ford
Fiesta
Movement.
 Never
before
has
a
car
company
offered
poten;al
car
owners
the
 chance
to
drive
a
vehicle
not
yet
available
a
year
in
advance
and
share
 their
story
online.

And
that’s
just
what
Ford
did.

Over
4000
applicants
 applied
by
submiDng
a
video
telling
Ford
why
they
deserve
to
be
one
of
 the
first
to
drive
the
all
new
2011
Ford
Fiesta.

100
were
chosen
and
 given
the
keys
for
6
months.



600
missions
were
completed,
compiled
 and
uploaded
to
www.fiestamovement.com
where
poten;al
shoppers
 can
get
a
peak
at
the
stories
and
experiences
of
these
“agents”
for
Ford.


 The
results….
 4.3
million
YouTube
views
 540,000
Flickr
images
 3
million
TwiGer
followers*
 And
most
importantly,

 
50,000
handraisers



 
97%
of
which
do
not
own
a
Ford
 *ScoU
Monty,
Ford
Social
Media,
Nov,
2009
 ADVOCACY
 SHAREABLE
CONTENT
 MOMENTUM

    • 3. ARCHITECT the solutions (The “Who, What, Where”) 63
    • Think of traditional marketing strategy as construction How and where we want to say it Design (creative execution & placement) How we want to be Frame perceived (core values, tone, voice) What we want to be Foundation (positioning, logo, tagline, selling proposition) 64
    • And this is what we often build… a big, ugly, concrete, ridged, inflexible building that shows its age a year after its been built. And after a while, we want something new because it isn’t working. 65
    • And when it doesn’t work we do this… and start over 66
    • We need to stop building huge “brand” houses from the ground up, brick-by-brick. And start building… PRE-FAB modular 67
    • PRE-FAB brand thinking 1.  Start small rather than big. But have a blueprint. 68
    • PRE-FAB brand thinking 1.  Start small rather than big. But have a blueprint. 2.  Think components. It’s not just about one campaign idea, one audience or one strategy. It’s how many varying pieces all come together, each with a purpose. 69
    • PRE-FAB brand thinking 1.  Start small rather than big. But have a blueprint. 2.  Think modular. It’s not just about one campaign idea, one audience or one strategy. It’s how many varying pieces all come together, each with a purpose. 3.  Be flexible. Add or subtract “rooms” and redesign as we build. 70
    • PRE-FAB brand thinking 1.  Start small rather than big. But have a blueprint. 2.  Think modular. It’s not just about one campaign idea, one audience or one strategy. It’s how many varying pieces all come together, each with a purpose. 3.  Be flexible. Add or subtract “rooms” and redesign as we build. 4.  Customize. We can’t apply the same rules every time because every business issue we solve is different. 71
    • PRE-FAB brand thinking 1.  Start small rather than big. But have a blueprint. 2.  Think modular. It’s not just about one campaign idea, one audience or one strategy. It’s how many varying pieces all come together, each with a purpose. 3.  Be flexible. Add or subtract “rooms” and redesign as we build. 4.  Customize. We can’t apply the same rules every time because every business issue we solve is different. 5.  Involve the customer; from design to placement to approval. The customer becomes an active and fully invested participant in the process - an advocate. But they don’t do all the work. 72
    • PRE-FAB brand thinking 1.  Start small rather than big. But have a blueprint. 2.  Think modular. It’s not just about one campaign idea, one audience or one strategy. It’s how many varying pieces all come together, each with a purpose. 3.  Be flexible. Add or subtract “rooms” and redesign as we build. 4.  Customize. We can’t apply the same rules every time because every business issue we solve is different. 5.  Involve the customer; from design to placement to approval. The audience becomes an active and fully invested participant in the process - an advocate. But they don’t do all the work. 73
    • PRE-FAB thinking is designed for a “people first” media landscape Gaming Sharing Brand Participation Social Microsites Networks Portals Common Community Experiences Destinations Blogs Search On Demand Personal Feeds/Filters Time & Place Start Mobile Pages Shifting 74
    • WHO are we trying to influence? WHAT are the ways we can reach them? WHERE can we start a conversation? MODULAR FRAMEWORK 75
    • Let’s look at an example… THE IDEA: “It’s designed to bring to life compelling, original and even quirky stories, and showcase the diversity of media, sources and platforms consumers discover on the site.” - Catherine Captain, VP Marketing 76
    • 77
    • Did MSNBC do all these things? IDEA A fuller spectrum of news  SPREADABLE - something you’d want to pass along to others INSIGHT  WEARABLE - affinity toward a brand Readers want all the news, not just  IDENTIFIABLE - represents what a brand stands for in our minds “the news”  MEMORABLE - stands apart from everything else  MODULAR - many components, each with a purpose that fit together to form the idea 78
    • 79
    • Let’s recap… 1.  Identify THE ISSUE Find the true problem not the symptom 2.  Discover THE IDEA Define the AUDIENCE Uncover the true INSIGHT Craft an IDEA 1.  Architect the SOLUTION Develop the “who, what, where” modular framework 80
    • A final thought… Never underestimate the power of an incredible idea…. How to think about it How to share it How to sell it 81
    • Now go and SOLVE THE ISSUES and get out of advertising Thank You. Steve Chamberlain schamber@digitas.com 82