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SkillSwap Weekend - Usability Testing
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SkillSwap Weekend - Usability Testing

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  • Introduce myself + Gabi\n
  • Who has gone to the activities fair and signed up for a DLIST?\n\nFor the freshman, you go to activities fair and signup for 10 groups... then CMU sets in\n\nHavent been in this situation? You will be.\n
  • Who has gone to the activities fair and signed up for a DLIST?\n\nFor the freshman, you go to activities fair and signup for 10 groups... then CMU sets in\n\nHavent been in this situation? You will be.\n
  • Who has gone to the activities fair and signed up for a DLIST?\n\nFor the freshman, you go to activities fair and signup for 10 groups... then CMU sets in\n\nHavent been in this situation? You will be.\n
  • Who has gone to the activities fair and signed up for a DLIST?\n\nFor the freshman, you go to activities fair and signup for 10 groups... then CMU sets in\n\nHavent been in this situation? You will be.\n
  • Who has gone to the activities fair and signed up for a DLIST?\n\nFor the freshman, you go to activities fair and signup for 10 groups... then CMU sets in\n\nHavent been in this situation? You will be.\n
  • If people get lost, they’ll get frustrated.\nIf your website is hard to understand, they’ll leave.\nIf your app is confusing, they’ll delete it and give it 1 star.\n
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  • http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/cambridge/projects/sensecam/downloads/CambridgeBig.wmv\n
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  • Learnability: How easy is the system to learn?\nEfficiency: Expert users can reach high levels of productivity\nMemorability: Users can return to system without relearning\nErrors: Low error rate & easy recovery\nSatisfaction: Users should feel satisfied after using it\n
  • But... the talk is called usability *testing*\nWhy do we have to strategically test usability?\nWhy can’t we just build *usable* interfaces?\n(learnability, efficiency, memorability, error reduction, satisfaction)\n
  • It is impossible to design an optimal UI by giving it your best shot\nInfinite potential for making unexpected misinterpretations of UI\n^^ this is expected. Design with this expectation.\n\nEthernet example\n
  • CMU ethernet example\n\n
  • This is easy to miss. You have to test your designs.\n\n
  • This is easy to miss. You have to test your design.\nThis is obvious, but there are 5 things you wont see for every one you do\n
  • Design with this in mind. Expect to be surprised. Expect to iterate.\n
  • Another reason we have to test usability\n
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  • 50% on you (arms length)\n80% in the room\n20% off\n
  • HCI Cliche\nA designer can look at any screen and believe it makes perfect sense\n
  • I promise the designer of CMU’s academic audit had no trouble figuring out what classes they need to take to graduate. For the rest of us, not so much.\n\n
  • Another example of why designers cant evaluate their own UIs.\nLearning a UI is a one way street\nFedEX logo\nWhat has been seen cannot be unseen\n
  • One more for fun. \n\nPoint is: Once you learn how to interact with a UI, you can’t “un learn it”\n
  • Alright, alright. Usability is important. We need to study it. So why not just ask people?\n\nPeople are incapable of describing their actions\nDescribe yourself at grocery store\n
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  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZR64EF3OpA\n\nyou don’t need to put the work into building the functionality until you are certain that it’s even needed\n
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  • Last task should be easy to leave users satisfied.\n
  • Last task should be easy to leave users satisfied.\n
  • Training: Give Kinect example\n
  • Contamination/crime scene comparison?\n*** unless clearly stuck and frustrated\n
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  • *** unless clearly stuck and frustrated\n\nInformal comment: I dont like this\n
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  • Learnability: How easy is the system to learn?\nEfficiency: Expert users can reach high levels of productivity\nMemorability: Users can return to system without relearning\nErrors: Low error rate & easy recovery\nSatisfaction: Users should feel satisfied after using it\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Usability TestingKevin SchaeferGabi Marcu
    • 2. Why make something usable?Necessary for survival
    • 3. The customer is always rightYou can’t blame the user
    • 4. How is usability defined?LearnabilityEfficiencyMemorabilityErrorsSatisfactionfrom Jakob Nielsen’s “Usability Engineering”
    • 5. Why test usability?
    • 6. Your best guess isn’t good enough
    • 7. Your best guess isn’t good enough
    • 8. We don’t understand ourselvesas well as we think we do
    • 9. Smart phone habitsWhat percentage of the time do youhave your smart phone on you?
    • 10. Smart phone habitsWhat percentage of the time do youhave your smart phone on you?~60%Dey et al. 2011
    • 11. You are not the user
    • 12. Why not just ask?People lie.
    • 13. What is usability testing?Method of evaluating the ease-of-useof a system through directobservation.
    • 14. What is usability testing not?
    • 15. ✔ ✘ User Usability Expert Behavior OpinionDirect Observation Indirect Structured Ethnographic via McGill University
    • 16. Not focus groups.Not market research.
    • 17. When to test usability?Early & often.
    • 18. Low fidelity High fidelity
    • 19. Wizard of Oz Technique
    • 20. Practical approachesto usability testing
    • 21. Running a usability test1) Choose tasks2) Choose users3) Perform the test
    • 22. Running a test: Choosing tasksVery specificRepresentative of target usesMost important parts of UINot too short, not too longStart simple, end simple
    • 23. 1) “Enter sales figures for six regionsfor each of four quarters, with thesenumbers.”2) “Calculate totals and percentages ofthe data.”
    • 24. Running a test: Choosing usersRepresentative of target usersMust be novicesOptional: trainingDon’t repeat on different designs
    • 25. Running a test: Perform the test“We’re testing the software. Not you.”One experimenterRefrain from interaction with user *No personal opinionsYou are a peer. Not an expert.Optional: Video recordingOptional: Think-Aloud Technique
    • 26. “Thinking aloud may be the singlemost valuable usability engineeringmethod.”
    • 27. Think-Aloud TechniqueReveals how users view and interpretthe UIUsers continuously think out loudWealth of qualitative dataUnnatural/difficult for usersAvoid rationalizations of thoughts
    • 28. Good: “What are you thinking now?”from Jakob Nielsen’s “Usability Engineering”
    • 29. Bad: “What do you think the messageon the bottom of the screen means?”from Jakob Nielsen’s “Usability Engineering”
    • 30. Demo of Think-Aloud Technique
    • 31. Running a usability test1) Choose tasks2) Choose users3) Perform the test
    • 32. Kevin Schaefer kjschaef@andrew.cmu.edThank you. u Gabi Marcu

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