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"Climate Change, Sea Level Rise and Sustainable Communities: Defining the Challenge and the Opportunities" by Sacha Spector
 

"Climate Change, Sea Level Rise and Sustainable Communities: Defining the Challenge and the Opportunities" by Sacha Spector

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"Climate Change, Sea Level Rise and Sustainable Communities: Defining the Challenge and the Opportunities" presentation by Sacha Spector, Scenic Hudson from the 4/13/12 Columbia-Greene Revitalizing ...

"Climate Change, Sea Level Rise and Sustainable Communities: Defining the Challenge and the Opportunities" presentation by Sacha Spector, Scenic Hudson from the 4/13/12 Columbia-Greene Revitalizing Hudson Riverfronts forum.

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    "Climate Change, Sea Level Rise and Sustainable Communities: Defining the Challenge and the Opportunities" by Sacha Spector "Climate Change, Sea Level Rise and Sustainable Communities: Defining the Challenge and the Opportunities" by Sacha Spector Presentation Transcript

    • R EVITALIZING H UDSON R IVERFRONTSIllustrated Conservation & Development Strategies for Creating Healthy, Prosperous CommunitiesOpportunities in an Era of Global Climate Change
    • Revitalizing Hudson RiverfrontsOpportunity in an Era of Climate Change
    • what’s happening now 3-strategy roadmap co-benefits of actionThe Opportunity of aLifetime
    • Indicators of a Warming WorldGlaciers Humidity Temperature Over Land Snow Cover Air Temperature Near Surface (troposphere) Temperature Over Oceans Tree-lines shifting poleward and upward Sea Surface Temperature Sea Level Spring coming earlier Ice Sheets Ocean Heat Content Species migrating poleward and upward Sea Ice
    • Indicators of aWarming World source: National Center for Atmospheric Research http://www2.ucar.edu/news/1036/record-high-temperatures-far-outpace-record-lows-across-us
    • Northeast annual avg. temp up 1.4°F since 1970 New York winter temperatures almost 5oF warmer than 30 years ago.Observed Changes in New York
    • 1990 USDA Hardiness Zones vs. 2006 Arborday.org Hardiness Zones differences reflect warmer climate Later frost in fall Earlier plant germination and blooms Earlier arrival ofzone change migratory birds +2 +1 no change Timing of lake ice -1 -2 formation and melting 1990 2006 Changes in species ranges Changes in precipitationObserved Changes in New York
    • Return Period (Years)Return (Years) Years) Rainfall (in.)110 5.55105 5.50 • More precipitation100 5.45 (slightly)95 5.40 • More rain in winter90 5.3585 5.30 • Increasing extreme80 5.25 storms (heavy rain75 1961 1981 2001 2021 2041 2061 5.20 in a short period of time) Return Return Period in. per Y Equivalent to 1961-1990 100-year stormNumber Events > 1 of Stormear Year Amount of 100-year storm10 Observed • Summers warmer, 8 HADCM3 with drier soils and periodic drought 6 • Summer low 4 streamflow period 2 will be longer 1961 1981 2001 2021 2041 2061 2081 Year YearObserved Changes in New York
    • the imperative to facilitate the persistence of thetinue to provide ecological services that sustainoptimal balance will require locally-specific tactics edge, and regional strategies that coordinate effortsmework. Hudson River Sea Level 1856-2009 Sea level is 1’ higher Sea Level a (in mm, observed at Manhattan) than 100 years ago Rise 500 Rate of sea level average = 2.79mm/yr by 2080 rise is accelerating 400 Lower emissions: 300 8-23 inches 200 Higher emissions: 100 source: NOAA 37-50 inches 0 1856 1881 1906 1931 1956 1981 2006 Figure 2. Sea level change since 1856, observed by tidal gauge at the Battery, Manhattan, NYC. er Sea Level Rise on the Hudsonwe can expect water levels on the Hudson River –ral Dam at Troy - to rise by up to five feet by the end
    • SAVING THE LAND THAT MATTERS MOST 2020 2050 2080Hudson River Sea Level Rise Projections 1155 additional acres 2641 additional acres 4647 additional acres inundation zone > 5000 acres bySea Level Rise on the Hudson 2080
    • The Hudson Valley:A Climate Crossroads
    • 160+ miles of estuarine riverglobally rare habitats85% of NY’s vertebrate speciesglobal hotspotsWhat’s at Stake? RamsHorn Marsh
    • 82 communities>250,000 people$Bs of infrastructurehistoric & cultural centersWhat’s at Stake?
    • underpinnings of localWhat’s at Stake? & regional economies
    • security resilience justiceSustainable Waterfront viable economiesCommunities healthy environments
    • Save taxpayer dollars Spur local economies and create millions of green jobs Improve public health Reduce risks to people and property Enhance national security Create a legacy of leadership and conservation ...and avert catastrophe.Opportunity
    • How Do We PlanToward the Best ofBoth Worlds?
    • Restored Tributary SAV Preserved Ecologically Sensitive Area Diverse Housing Types, Sizes and Affordability 4 Wetland 4 Parking Garage and On-Street Parking Alley and Parking Behind Buildings 4 Local Street Along Greenways and Parks 4 4 Renovated Existing 4 4 Buildings 4 4 4 70-FOOT SETBACK In Built Riverfront Areas 4 4 4 Special Public Spaces Viewing Piers, Marinas 4 Tour Boat Facilities 4 4 4 4 4 Bioretention Areas Parking Lot Screening Restored Historic Building 100-YEAR FLOODPLAIN 100-FOOT SETBACK In Parks, Greenways, and Natural Areas 4 4 Plan by Raymond Curran 100” 200” 300” 400” 500”Mixed-Use Buildings Public Buildings Residential Buildings Resilient Soften and Protect Riverfront Restore Tidal WetlandsCommunities Shorelines and Floodplains
    • R EVITALIZING H UDSON R IVERFRONTSIllustrated Conservation & Development Strategies for Creating Healthy, Prosperous Communities www.revitalizinghudonsriverfronts.org
    • Restored Tributary SAV Preserved Ecologically Sensitive Area Diverse Housing Types, • Identify built and natural assets Sizes and Affordability 4 Wetland 4 Parking Garage and On-Street Parking Alley and Parking at risk Behind Buildings • Steer development away from 4 Local Street Along Greenways and Parks 4 4 Renovated Existing shorelines and floodplains 4 4 Buildings 4 4 4 • Site new infrastructure out of 70-FOOT SETBACK In Built Riverfront Areas 4 the 500+ year floodplain 4 4 Special Public Spaces Viewing Piers, Marinas 4 Tour Boat Facilities 4 4 • New structures elevated or 4 resilient 4 4 Bioretention Areas • Employ softer, greener Parking Lot Screening shoreline treatments where Restored Historic Building 100-YEAR FLOODPLAIN appropriate 100-FOOT SETBACK In Parks, Greenways, and Natural Areas 4 4 Plan by Raymond Curran 100” 200” 300” 400” 500”Mixed-Use Buildings Public Buildings Residential Buildings
    • Four Basic Typologies Natural Area The Riverfront Greenway Community ParkRFRONT 100 / 100 ruleOR This mostly vegetated -looking steps waterfront ish a riverfront greenway corridor corridor should extend inland reenway corridor serves as continuous,hat provides public access, recreation, Built Riverfront to the 100-year floodplain conditions allow, this mostly vegetated he 100-year floodplain boundary OR boundary OR 100 feet fromter line, whichever is GREATER. the mean high-water line,s can be thought of as falling into four whichever is GREATER.ost urban form of the riverfrontctions as a direct extension of the Linear Riverfront r municipal center. It provides public Park should include lively, mixed-use, estinations drawing upon local cultural, tal assets. Long, narrow public areas within the
    • A Gradient of Riverfront Communities
    • d T k 3 Identify Resources, Risks, and Vulnerability: v yCornwall’s Waterfront r on Sea Level Rise Sea-Level Habitats Ramshorn Marsh photo: Jeffery Anzevino
    • Inunda&on    Zone
    • Inunda&on    ZoneTidal  Wetland
    • Inunda&on    Zone Tidal  Wetland Hardened  Shoreline^^^ Natural  Shoreline
    • Inunda&on    Zone Tidal  Wetland Hardened  Shoreline^^^ Natural  Shoreline Inundated  Infrastructure  ROW
    • v T 3 r yv d k Inunda&on    Zone Tidal  Wetlandj Hardened  Shoreline ^^^ Natural  Shoreline y Inundated  Infrastructure  ROW
    • Soften and Restore Shorelines
    • Dead stout stake to secure geotextile fabric * Not to scale Eroded streambank Install additional vegetation like live stakes, rooted seedlings, etc. Compacted soil about 1-foot thick Live cuttings Geotextile fabricHeight varies: 8-feet max. High tide Low tide Streambed Rock fill 2 to 3 ft. NOTE: Rooted/leafed condition Esopus Meadows Watertrail Preserve, Esopus of living plant material does not 3 to 4 f represent time of installation. eet Geotextile fabric recommended High tide Low tide Streambed Dead stout stake used to secure geotextile fabric Riprap Live stakes Foundry Dock Park, Cold Spring
    • Existing vegetation, plantings or soil bioengineering systemsLive branch cuttings(1/2 to 1 inch diameter) Erosion control High tide fabric Low tide Compacted fill material Streambed 2 to 3 feet Geotextile fabric Gabion basketsNOTE: Rooted/leafed conditionof living plant material does notrepresent time of installation. * Not to scale
    • Protect Tidal andSupratidal Habitats Ramshorn Marsh
    • Restore Tidal andSupratidal Habitats Hudson South Bay
    • CurrentLegend Tidal Wetlands Non-Tidal Wetlands NHP Occurrences
    • 2020Legend Tidal Wetlands Non-Tidal Wetlands NHP Occurrences
    • 2050Legend Tidal Wetlands Non-Tidal Wetlands NHP Occurrences
    • 2080Legend Tidal Wetlands Non-Tidal Wetlands NHP Occurrences
    • A Roadmapto Resilience