Caluses

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Caluses

  1. 1. Language NetworkClauses and Sentence Structure
  2. 2. Clauses and Sentence Structure Kinds of Clauses Here’s the Idea Independent Clauses Subordinate Clauses Why It Matters Practice and Apply
  3. 3. Here’s the Idea ClauseA clause is a group of words thatcontains a subject and a verb.
  4. 4. Here’s the Idea SUBJECT VERBYour genes carry your family’s genetic history. CLAUSE
  5. 5. Here’s the IdeaClauses add details.Clauses show relationshipsbetween ideas.
  6. 6. Here’s the IdeaIndependent ClauseAn independent (or main)clause expresses a completethought and can stand aloneas a sentence.
  7. 7. Here’s the IdeaGenes contain the code foryour physical appearance. INDEPENDENT CLAUSE
  8. 8. Here’s the IdeaSubordinate ClauseA subordinate (or dependent)clause contains a subject anda verb but does not express acomplete thought and cannotstand alone as a sentence.
  9. 9. Here’s the IdeaSubordinate clauses are introduced by wordslike if, because, that, when, and since. because inherited genes often skip a generation SUBORDINATE CLAUSE
  10. 10. Here’s the Idea By itself, a subordinate clause is a sentence fragment.that determines your height SUBORDINATE CLAUSE
  11. 11. Here’s the IdeaFor a complete thought to be expressed,a subordinate clause must be part of asentence that contains an independentclause. INDEPENDENT CLAUSE Genes contain the code that determines your height. SUBORDINATE CLAUSE
  12. 12. Why It Matters Recognizing independent and subordinate clauses will help you avoid a kind of fragment:a subordinate clause accidentallywritten as a sentence.
  13. 13. Why It MattersIdentify the subordinate clauses that actas fragments. STUDENT MODEL DRAFT Clasp your hands together. As the picture shows. Which thumb is on top? If you clasp your hands to position the other thumb on top. This little trait is inherited.
  14. 14. Why It MattersTo fix these fragments, join themwith independent clauses. STUDENT MODEL STUDENT MODEL DRAFT REVISON Clasp your hands Clasp your hands together. As the picture together as the picture shows. Which thumb is shows. Which thumb is on top? If you clasp on top? If you clasp your hands to position your hands to position the other thumb on the other thumb on top, top. This little trait is it feels wrong. This little inherited. trait is inherited.
  15. 15. Practice and ApplyJoin this subordinate clause with anindependent clause. 1. because my father is tall
  16. 16. Practice and ApplyJoin this subordinate clause with anindependent clause. 2. even though his twin sisters look alike
  17. 17. Practice and ApplyJoin this subordinate clause with anindependent clause. 3. that shows her family tree
  18. 18. Practice and ApplyJoin this subordinate clause with anindependent clause. 4. when my ancestors arrived in this country
  19. 19. Clauses and Sentence StructureAdjective Clauses Here’s the Idea Adjective Clauses Essential Adjective Clauses Nonessential Adjective Clauses Why It Matters Practice and Apply
  20. 20. Here’s the IdeaSubordinate clauses canbe adjective clauses.
  21. 21. Here’s the Idea Adjective ClauseAn adjective clause is asubordinate clause that is usedas an adjective to modify anoun or a pronoun.
  22. 22. Here’s the Idea What does each adjective clause modify?A family is more than a groupof people who are related.NOUNIt was she who started our family tree.PRONOUN
  23. 23. Here’s the IdeaAn adjective clause is introduced by arelative pronoun or by a relative adverb.that, who, whom, where, when,whose, which why
  24. 24. Here’s the IdeaEssential Adjective Clause An essential (or restrictive) adjective clause provides information that is necessary to identify the preceding noun or pronoun.
  25. 25. Here’s the Idea ESSENTIAL ADJECTIVE CLAUSESomeone who is your first cousinis the child of your uncle or aunt.
  26. 26. Here’s the IdeaNonessential Adjective Clause A nonessential (or nonrestrictive) adjective clause adds additional information about a noun or pronoun whose meaning is already clear.
  27. 27. Here’s the Idea NONESSENTIAL ADJECTIVE CLAUSEIrene, who is your first cousin, wasmarried last fall.
  28. 28. Here’s the IdeaUse commas to set off a nonessentialclause. The commas separatenonessential information from themain idea of the sentence.
  29. 29. Why It MattersAdjective clauses cansupply details necessaryto explain, support, andconnect your ideas.
  30. 30. Why It MattersAdjective clauses help to avoid repetition. STUDENT MODEL DRAFT The reception was held at an old hotel. The hotel looks like a castle.
  31. 31. Why It MattersJoin these sentences with independentclauses. STUDENT MODEL STUDENT MODEL DRAFT REVISONThe reception was The reception washeld at an old hotel. held at an old hotelThe hotel looks like that looks like a castle.a castle.
  32. 32. Practice and ApplyWrite the adjective clause, alongwith the word or words it modifies. 5. Aunt Ming, who is known for her funny jokes, entertains the family.
  33. 33. Practice and ApplyWrite the adjective clause, alongwith the word or words it modifies. 6. Spaghetti, which is Uncle Anthony’s specialty, is everyone’s favorite dish.
  34. 34. Practice and ApplyCombine these sentences by changing oneinto an adjective clause. 7. Emily’s ancestors arrived on Ellis Island in 1900. Emily’s ancestors sailed to America.
  35. 35. Practice and ApplyCombine these sentences by changing oneinto an adjective clause. 8. Her ancestors established a business in New York City. Many immigrants settled in New York City.

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