Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
2. linnaean era
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

2. linnaean era

131
views

Published on

(Sara - Mikayla) …

(Sara - Mikayla)
2. Linnaean era

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
131
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. LINNAEAN ERA By: Sara Ferrer & Mikayla van den Brenk
  • 2. STARTING POINT OF MODERN TAXONOMYFor nomenclaturalreasons two works of CarlLinnaeus (1707–1778, Fig.4) are regarded as thestarting points of modernbotanical and zoologicaltaxonomy.
  • 3. The global flora SpeciesPlantarum, published in1753 and the tenth editionof Systema Naturae in1758 including globalfauna.
  • 4. The reason for this is thatLinnaeus introduced inthese books a binary formof species names called"trivial names" for bothplants and animals
  • 5. For each species hecreated an epithet thatcould be used togetherwith the genus name. Thetrivial names wereintended for fieldworkand education, and not toreplace the earlier phrasenames.
  • 6. The phrase namesincluded a description ofthe species thatdistinguished it fromother known species inthe genus.
  • 7. With an expandedknowledge of the globalfauna and flora through17th and 18th centuryscientific expeditions, alarge number of newspecies were found andnamed, and more termshad to be added to eachphrase name.
  • 8. By the time of Linnaeusthe situation was reallybad. Linnaeus counted8530 species of floweringplants in 1753.