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Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
Ferry-Oriented Development
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Ferry-Oriented Development

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  • Hello, and welcome to Session 319: Ferry-Oriented DevelopmentThis session is sponsored by the TRB Ferry Transportation and Transportation and Land Development committees.
  • Transit-oriented communities are places that, by their design, allowpeople to drive less and walk, cycle, and take transit more. In practice,this means they concentrate higher-density, mixed-use, human-scale development around frequent transit stops and stations. They alsoprovide well-connected and well-designed networks of streets, creating walking- and cycling-friendly communities focused around frequent transit.
  • The discussion of transit-oriented development is a bit like the chicken or egg causality dilemma.
  • Is it transit that creates land use density, or developments that create ridership to support transit? Does transit justify development, or does development justify transit?
  • The real question we should be asking isn’t an either or. Both are important. The key point is the relationship of placehoodand movement.Transit systems should be seen as part of a much bigger picture of remaking our urban places, as they attract new mixed-use developments and open up urban infill sites for revitalization, boosting local tax bases.Communities built in this way have proven to be particularly livable, sustainable, and resilient places. Andtransit-oriented communities makeit possible to operate efficient, cost-effective transit service.
  • As with other transit modes, ferry systems can benefit from smart development in the vicinity of terminals and surrounding communities. 
  • Joined with me today are three presenters who will be talking about their research and work related to ferry-oriented development.
  • But first, to set the stage and get us thinking about what makes a successful ferry-oriented development, I have a few slides outlining ferry-oriented development in the New York region.
  • Jersey City lies between of the Hudson River and Upper New York Bay across from Lower Manhattan.
  • As the second largest New Jersey city, Jersey City has led an amazing transformation from an old downtown with a long-blighted waterfront to anurban location.
  • What makes Jersey City’s renaissance particularly unique is in addition to the characteristic residential growth of most TODs, Manhattan headquarters were attracted to Jersey City because of the direct line of sight and transit connections.
  • Jersey City is served by various transit options including the Hudson Bergen Light Rail (HBLR), PATH trains, NJ Transit bus routes, and ferry lines.
  • Ferry serviceprovides connections to Manhattan from the Newport, Paulus Hook, Liberty Harbor, and Port Liberte terminals.
  • Weehawken is situatedon the western shore of the Hudson River, along the southern end of the New Jersey Palisades across from Midtown Manhattan.
  • In 1981, Arthur Imperatorepurchased a 350-acre site along the Hudson River, encompassing parts of Weehawken, West New York, and Guttenberg. The area also included old ferry slips; and in acquiring the property, Imperatore was granted rights to operate a ferry service to West 38th Street, Manhattan.In 1986, Imperatore and twenty passengers embarked on the inaugural crossing. After this maiden voyage, the Port Imperial Ferry Company, today known as NY Waterway, was established, which led to a revival of ferry service in the NY metropolitan region.
  • The Pershing Road terminal, renamed Port Imperial, provided service from an undersized and aging terminal for almost twenty years until the existing ferry terminal, built and owned by New Jersey Transit and leased by NY Waterway opened in May 2006.
  • The ferry service was used as a marketing tool to attract city workers who want to pay less for housing, keep their daily commute to a minimum, and still want to reside in an urban setting.
  • More recently, the East River Ferry pilot was launched in 2011 to fill a gap in the City’s transportation network, providing a frequent, reliable, environmentally sustainable interborough transportation alternative to the underserved residents of the Brooklyn and Queens waterfront.
  • Unlike the point-to-point service provided by the New York/New Jersey ferries, the ERF utilizes a ‘ladder’ configuration providing service to numerous landing sites.
  • One of the success factors of this pilot has been how it targeted upcoming waterfront neighborhoods that were primed for development.
  • There are several key themes underlying each of these case studies.Each involved efforts in coordinating land use and transit. Ferry service was used as a marketing tool to spur residential development.Also, these case studies are successful because they provide redundancy, which is especially useful during service outages.Building transit-oriented communities also requires coordinated action by citizens, municipalities, and regional agencies.
  • Transcript

    • 1. TRB 2013 Annual MeetingSession 319: Ferry-Oriented Development AP085 Ferry Transportation Committee ADD30 Transportation and Land Development Committee
    • 2. Transit-Oriented Development
    • 3. Transit-Oriented Development
    • 4. Transit-Oriented Development DART, Dallas Mixed Use Development, Chicago
    • 5. Transit-Oriented Development
    • 6. Ferry-Oriented Development Ferries serving Pike Place Market, Seattle
    • 7. PresentersIntegrating Passenger Ferry Service with Mass Transit• Karina Ricks, NelsonNygaard Consulting AssociatesCommuter Ferry Services in Virginia – Washington, D.C.and Hampton Roads• Noël P. Comeaux, Maritime AdministrationComparison of CityCat Ferry in Brisbane, Australia, andEast River Ferry in New York City• Neil Gavin Sipe, Griffith University, Australia
    • 8. Ferry-Oriented Development in the New York Region Stephanie Camay URS Corporation
    • 9. Case Studies• Jersey City, New Jersey• Weehawken, New Jersey• East River Ferry
    • 10. Jersey City
    • 11. Jersey CityOld ferry docks at the CRRNJ railroad terminal
    • 12. Jersey CityExchange Place Liberty Harbor North
    • 13. Jersey CityHudson Bergen Light Rail
    • 14. Jersey CityPaulus Hook Ferry Terminal
    • 15. Weehawken
    • 16. WeehawkenWeehawken Rail Yards and Ferry Landing, 1955
    • 17. WeehawkenPort Imperial Ferry Terminal
    • 18. Weehawken
    • 19. East River Ferry
    • 20. East River Ferry • East 34th Street • Long Island City • Greenpoint • Williamsburg • DUMBO • Wall Street • Governors Island
    • 21. East River FerryGreenpoint Landing
    • 22. Key ThemesCoordinate land use and transitProvide transportation optionsInvolve key stakeholdersIntegrate with other transit modes
    • 23. TRB 2013 Annual MeetingSession 319: Ferry-Oriented Development AP085 Ferry Transportation Committee ADD30 Transportation and Land Development Committee

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