Time Management for Students

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  • Slide/Screen 1 Content: Introduction Slide Slide/Screen 1 Narrative: Welcome to the Teaching Online Series. This section covers netiquette for online instructors. Instructional Strategy: User advances by clicking to the next screen All slides animation transition: Reveal Voice over screens. Non-Linear.
  • After viewing this presentation, you will be able to Define time management Identify the benefits of properly managing your time Identify how time management can affect your academic, personal, and professional goals Identify ways to better manage your time Keep a semester calendar and list
  • Time management is the managing of your time so that time is used to your advantage, and it gives you a chance to spend your most valuable resource in the way you choose.
  • You won't miss important "life" deadlines. "Life" deadlines and projects are those things that keep your life on track: turning in your FAFSA on time, getting your form in early so you have guaranteed on-campus housing next year, remembering to get your mom's birthday present in the mail early enough so it arrives on time. When your time management is bad, life can get ugly in an instant. You won't miss important academic deadlines. Paper coming up? Lab report due? Group assignment on the horizon? Missing academic deadlines means you may miss out on being able to stay in school, but having good time management means you get your assignments in on time -- and get a little sleep the night before they're due. You have more time to sleep well, eat right, and exercise regularly. Good time management means you have more, well, time. And the better you treat your body, the better it treats you. Putting a little energy into time management now means you'll have more energy to get through you days (and workload) later. You'll have less stress. Good time management means that horrible paper you have to write gets done in a reasonable amount of time with relatively little stress -- instead of amidst a panic attack the night before. You'll have more time to just relax and enjoy your time in school. Let's be honest: Even if you do decide to throw caution to the wind and just hang out with some friends in the quad, that research paper you're avoiding is still fluttering around in the back of your brain, being annoying. When you're good at managing your time, you can really let yourself relax, knowing that the time you'll need to rock that paper has already been allocated in your schedule. Good time management skills will help you in your post-college life. Think your always-late, always-behind pattern is going to change once you graduate? Think again. Taking the time to learn and make permanent strong time management skills will serve you well in your life after college. After all, how can you go out and change the world if you're always running behind -- and late?
  • Have you thought or said any of the following? “ I always end up cramming for exams.” “ I never have enough time to do my work.” “ I only study when there’s the pressure of a test.” “ My work always takes longer than I expect it to.” “ I’ve tried to make schedules for myself, but I don’t stick to them.” “ I’ve tried to make schedules for myself, but unexpected things come up.” “ When I’m doing work in one subject, I get distracted by thoughts of what I have to do for my other classes.” If you have ever thought or said one or more of the above, then you may have to consider better managing your time. There are only 24 hours in your day, just the same as everybody else’s. The good news is that there is enough time for the things you want, but only if it’s used, and used to your advantage. When you were attending high school, you probably got up at the same time everyday, and you went to school from approximately eight o’clock to three o’clock. You basically had no say in where your time went. Now that you are in college, your schedule is your business. If you want to have class from one o’clock to four o’clock or eight o’clock to eleven o’clock, it is your prerogative. With this new freedom, there are some decisions to make on how to effectively spend your free time. Have you had to deal with a time crunch of several exams in a week or tons of papers and projects with approaching deadlines? Of course, add to that part-time or full-time jobs, dating, partying, sleeping and whatever else college students try to cram into their days. So what to do? Study or have fun? These situations can be handled, and all it takes is a few techniques on how to better manage your time.
  • Time management begins with the use of a calendar or planner with daily lists and taking the time to write down everything that you must due, so that it gets done. If you sleep seven hours a night, you have 119 hours a week to do everything that you need to do. That, of course, includes everything from going to class, eating, athletic events, social activities, personal hygiene, time-in-transit, studying, student organizations, leisure activities, and everything in between. You must use all 119 hours a week to schedule everything that you must do. Then you must stick to your schedule, which should give you an idea of where your real priorities are. semester calendar: You can use the calendar function in Blackboard to keep track of major exams, due dates, and meetings. Use your class syllabi to help you complete the calendar. You should then keep a pocket calendar or use the month calendars in a planner as a reminder of classes, appointments, meetings, and errands. You should also add weekly items on a regular basis. Ideally, this would be done on Sunday night before the week begins. You can include all classes, exercise routine, work, extracurricular activities, housekeeping duties, sleeping, and eating. daily list: should be made each day, either when you wake up in the morning or each night before you go to bed. The list should be kept short, about five or six items, both academic and personal. The list should also be prioritized and the items should be small specific goals such as read five pages in psychology, not read a chapter of psychology.
  • Now that we have discussed how to schedule your time, there are a few pointers to consider about the time planners to help make the schedule and to help stick to the plan. Be specific. Rather than writing, “do Calculus problems,” indicate which problems. Be reasonable. Schedule what you think you will do. Take advantage of ALL your time, including little chunks of time such as riding on the bus. Be flexible, use a pencil when making your schedule. Plan to review your lecture notes everyday. Do not forget to schedule breaks. Make use of time before and after class. Schedule difficult tasks for your most alert periods.
  • • Schedule fixed blocks of time first • Include time for errands • Schedule time for fun • Set realistic goals • Study two hours for every hour in class (this varies for some people who may need more in certain classes than others) • Avoid scheduling marathon study sessions • Study in short sessions or stop and rest a few minutes every hour • Set clear starting and stopping times • Plan for the unplanned. Have room for flexibility. • Study during the daytime and in the nighttime. • Schedule each study period as close to that class meeting as possible.
  • You’re not on a college campus with thousands of other students who are also making time to study, so it can be hard to stay motivated. Falling behind, however, can cause you to fail courses, which, in turn, wastes your time and money. Here are seven important time management tips for online students: Set Aside Specific Hours for Schoolwork: Typical college students have classes during set times every day. As an online student, you aren’t restricted by such a rigid schedule. One way to stop yourself from procrastinating is to set aside specific hours for schoolwork every single day. You should consider this time that is somewhat inflexible–if you get done early, you can go out with your friends, but don’t schedule a night on the town for the time you typically schedule homework. Follow a Daily To-Do List: Scheduling time for your schoolwork is just a start when you’re trying to organize your time. It’s also a good idea to have a clear to-do list, or multiple to-do lists, depending on your class schedule. You can keep the list directly on a file on your computer or hand-write it and hang it on the wall to help keep you motivated. As you complete tasks, cross them off the list. The sense of accomplishment can be overwhelmingly relieving. Avoid Social Networking during “College” Hours: When you set a schedule for school, make sure that this is actually college time, not computer time. Ban yourself from social networking sites, such as Facebook when you’re supposed to be working. If you intend to spend a long time working online, you can reward yourself with little breaks every few hours, but otherwise stick to only using the computer for activities related to your classes. Study Small Amounts Every Week Rather than Cramming: This tip isn’t just for online students; it applies to all college students. As soon as you start learning about the material covered in the course, begin to study efficiently for the mid-term and final. Many courses also have other tests and pop quizzes, so by doing a small amount of studying every day, you’re preparing yourself for whatever your professor throws your way. Even just 15 minutes every night before you go to sleep can help you retain material. Come finals week, you’ll have a very good base of knowledge before you ever crack open a book to prepare for the exam Ask for Help as Soon as You Need It: Just like typical college professors, online college professors are more than happy to help students who feel confused or are struggling with their schoolwork. Most professors, however, won’t go out of their way to ask you if you need help. Don’t be afraid to speak up–and do so as soon as you start feeling unsure about a concept or lesson. If you wait until the end of the semester, you won’t be prepared for tests and the confusion will only snowball until it’s unmanageable. On the other hand, if you get help right away, you’ll spend less time on homework, papers, and studying throughout the entire semester. Set Your Own Deadlines: Whenever you are assigned a homework assignment or paper for your online class, schedule a deadline. When setting a deadline, don’t schedule it for the day the assignment is really due to your professor; instead, give yourself a few days of leeway in case you run into problems or otherwise need extra time to work. Try to stagger your personal due dates throughout the semester so you aren’t overwhelmed with work at any one time. Invest in a Laptop: Lastly, when you’re taking an online class, one of the best ways to manage your time is to invest in a laptop. You don’t need a laptop to take courses online, but having one means that you can make good use of time that would typically be lost, such as time during your morning commute on the train or waiting at the doctor’s office (just make sure that your connection is secure). Fit in your classes during times that would otherwise be wasted, and you’ll have much more free time during the rest of your day
  • This online training tutorial covered the following: Define time management Identify how time management can affect your academic, personal, and professional goals Identify ways to better manage your time Keep a semester calendar and list For additional information on Time Management for Students, contact the Center for Distance Learning at [email_address]

Transcript

  • 1. Center for Distance Learning Tallahassee Community College Time Management: A Brief Overview for Online Students
  • 2. Learning outline
    • After viewing this presentation, you will be able to
    • Define time management
    • Identify the benefits of properly managing your time
    • Identify how time management can affect your academic, personal, and professional goals
    • Identify ways to better manage your time
    • Keep a semester calendar and list
  • 3. What is Time Management?
    • Time management is the managing of your time so that time is used to your advantage, and it gives you a chance to spend your most valuable resource in the way you choose.
  • 4. Benefits of Time Management
    • You won't miss important "life" deadlines.
    • You won't miss important academic deadlines.
    • You have more time to sleep well, eat right, and exercise regularly.
    • You'll have less stress.
    • You'll have more time to just relax and enjoy your time in school.
    • Good time management skills will help you in your post-college life.
    • What other benefits can you think of? As we continue this presentation, begin thinking about how would properly managing your time help you to better achieve your academic and personal goals. What are some methods that you could employ to better manage your time?
  • 5. Ask Yourself Have you thought or said any of the following? “ I always end up cramming for exams.” “ I never have enough time to do my work.” “ I only study when there’s the pressure of a test.” “ My work always takes longer than I expect it to.” “ I’ve tried to make schedules for myself, but I don’t stick to them.” “ I’ve tried to make schedules for myself, but unexpected things come up.” “ When I’m doing work in one subject, I get distracted by thoughts of what I have to do for my other classes.” If you have ever thought or said one or more of the above, then you may have to consider better managing your time.
  • 6. Planners, Calendars, and Lists
    • Time management begins with the use of a calendar or planner with daily lists and taking the time to write down everything that you must due, so that it gets done.
    • semester calendar:
      • Keep track of exams, due dates, and meetings
      • Record your classes appointments meetings and errands- update it on a regular basis
    • daily list: make one each day
      • Keep it short
      • Prioritize your goals
  • 7. Monitoring your time
    • Tips when making your schedules:
    • Be specific. Rather than writing, “do Calculus problems,” indicate which problems.
    • Be reasonable. Schedule what you think you will do.
    • Take advantage of ALL your time, including little chunks of time such as riding on the bus.
    • Be flexible; use a pencil when making your schedule.
    • Plan to review your lecture notes everyday.
    • Do not forget to schedule breaks.
    • Make use of time before and after class.
    • Schedule difficult tasks for your most alert periods.
  • 8. To Plan Your Time
    • • Schedule fixed blocks of time first
    • • Include time for errands
    • • Schedule time for fun
    • • Set realistic goals
    • • Study two hours for every hour in class (this varies for some people who may need more in certain classes than others)
    • • Avoid scheduling marathon study sessions
    • • Study in short sessions or stop and rest a few minutes every hour
    • • Set clear starting and stopping times
    • • Plan for the unplanned. Have room for flexibility.
    • • Study during the daytime and in the nighttime.
    • • Schedule each study period as close to that class meeting as possible.
  • 9. Tips for Online Students
    • Set aside specific hours for schoolwork
    • Follow a daily to-do list
    • Avoid social networking during “college” hours
    • Study small amounts every week rather than cramming
    • Ask for help as soon as you need it
    • Set your own deadlines
    • Invest in a laptop
  • 10. Additional Tips Time Management Tips for Students
  • 11. Conclusion
    • This online training tutorial covered the following:
    • The definition of time management
    • The benefits of properly managing your time
    • How time management can affect your academic, personal, and professional goals
    • Ways to better manage your time
    • How to keep a semester calendar and list
    For additional information on Time Management for Students, contact the Center for Distance Learning at [email_address] Tallahassee Community College
  • 12. References
    • 2011. Doherty, Brooks. Time management tips for students. [Video File]. Retrieved December 19, 2011 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICjDACIGkLc&feature=BFa&li st=SP5FA7E268C30241EE&lf=list_related
    • 2011. Seven important time management tips for online students. Date accessed December 8, 2011 from http://bestonlineuniversities.com/7-important-time- management-tips-for-online-students/
    • Lucier, Kelci. Benefits of time management. Date accessed December 19, 2011 from http://collegelife.about.com/od/TimeManagement/a/Benefits-Of-Time- Management.htm