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E Books
 

E Books

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550 final presentation

550 final presentation

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    E Books E Books Presentation Transcript

    • eBooks
      How do you solve a problem like eBooks?
      Shanna Caines
      550
      Dec. 10, 2009
      scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • Some History
      The idea of ebooks have been around for a long time
      In 1895, Albert Robida, predicted the end of books
      Gramophone or “speaking tube” would become small enough to carry around
      Shanna Caines; 550; Dec. 10, 2009; scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • A speaker records a book that a distant listener may later acquire and “read” at home, at leisure
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • A pocket-sized “reading device,” portable anywhere.
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • The automated book kiosk for “downloading” content.
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • “Reading” on a train-which dramatically resembles today’s plugged-in youth.
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • More History
      In 1968, Alan Kay proposed the DynaBook
      The DynaBook was never produced, but it is the forerunner to the eReaders we have today
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • Dynabook
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • More History
      In the 1970s the Gutenberg Project made thousands of books available for free as digital documents
      The 1990s brought the SoftBook Reader and Rocket eBook
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • More History
      softbook
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • More History
      Rocket eBook
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • More History
      In 2000, Stephen King released his novella Riding the Bullet exclusively as an ebook
      Over 100,000 people downloaded it
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • But where are eBooks now?
      Despite early success, eBooks have not been as successful as was previously hoped
      Why not?
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • What is an eBook?
      There is no standard definition to what an ebook is
      Possible definitions: “a digital object designed to be read on a handheld reading device or to be listened to from a speech-generating tool”
      “all linear texts of some length that can be shown on a computer screen”
      “electronic versions of documents already in print form
      eReader
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • How do you use it?
      There is no standard technology for reading ebooks
      eReaders
      Computers
      iPods
      Mobile phones
      Various other mobile devices
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • Who owns it?
      Publishers are afraid of losing money on ebooks
      Publishers are so fiercely protective of their digital rights, there is little to no interoperability between ebook systems
      Digital Rights Management is still unclear regarding eBooks
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • Why don’t people like it?
      Difficult to read
      E-paper and e-ink has made things easier, but it does not compare to a printed book
      Cost prohibitive
      will become more popular as the technology becomes cheaper and prices go down
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • Why don’t libraries like it?
      Cheaper?
      On the surface, ebooks seem cheaper, but if patrons do not use them, what’s the point
      Difficult to implement
      The business model is geared towards individual sales, not libraries
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • Is there hope?
      ejournals are indispensible in academic libraries
      computer, technology, and how-to ebooks are popular in libraries
      Depending on how their implemented, some libraries have had great success with ebooks
      The industry is still evolving, the future may hold much better options then are currently available
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu
    • References
      Armstrong, Chris, Louise Edwards, and Ray Lonsdale. “Virtually there? E-books in UK academic libraries” Program: electric library and information systems 36.4 (2002): 216-227. Web. 19 November 2009.
      Bennett, Linda and Monica Landoni. “E-books in academic libraries.” The Electronic Library 23.1 (2005): 9-16. Web. 19 November 2009.
      Cox, John. “E-Books: Challenges and Opportunities.” D-Lib Magazine 10.10 (2004): n. pag. Web. 19 November 2009.
      Dillon, Dennis. “E-books: the University of Texas experience, part 1” Library Hi Tech 19.2 (2001): 113-124. Web. 19 November 2009.
      Fowler, Geoffrey A. “E-Readers: They’re Hot Now, But the Story Isn’t Over.” The Wall Street Journal 2 December 2009: Web. 4 December 2009
      Gibbons, Susan. “Ebooks: Some Concerns and Surprises.” Libraries and the Academy 1.1 (2001): 71-75. Web. 19 November 2009.
      Harrison, Beverly. “E-Books and the Future of Reading.” IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications 20.3 (2000): 32-39. Web. 19 November 2000
      Hillesund, Terje. “Will E-books Change the World?” First Monday 6.10 (2001): n. pag. Web. 19 November 2009.
      Long, Sarah Ann. “The case for e-books: an introduction” New Library World 104.1184/1185 (2003): 29-32. Web. 19 November 2009.
      Stevenson, Iain. “Harry Potter, Riding the Bullet and the Future of Books: Key Issues in the Anglophone Book Business.” Pub Res Q 24 (2008): 277-284. Web. 9 December 2009.
      Shanna Caines, 550, Dec. 10, 2009, scaines@eden.rutgers.edu