Moffett RAB Hangar One Subcommittee Report: Cork Room
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Moffett RAB Hangar One Subcommittee Report: Cork Room

on

  • 667 views

Presentation to the Moffett Field Restoration Advisory Board May 13, 2010: Hangar One Subcommittee Report

Presentation to the Moffett Field Restoration Advisory Board May 13, 2010: Hangar One Subcommittee Report

Statistics

Views

Total Views
667
Views on SlideShare
617
Embed Views
50

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

2 Embeds 50

http://www.nuqu.org 47
http://www.slideshare.net 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Moffett RAB Hangar One Subcommittee Report: Cork Room Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Materials for Hangar 1 • The exterior and interior corrugated surface of  the hangar consists of two types of materials.   The first material was installed to a height of 132  feet above ground. Above the first material, a  mansard siding was installed up to the flat roof  transition. Both sidings are Robertson Protected  Metal siding.  • Doors and Windows • Interior Framing • Concrete Floor
  • 2. Settling Basin
  • 3. Runoff Water
  • 4. Major Sources of Aroclor‐1268 Robertson’s Metal • Layer 1: A specially annealed steel sheet  ‐ Aroclor‐1268 at 19  mg/kg (probably from adhered tar adhesive) .  • Layer 2: An air‐blown petroleum asphalt layer which could not  be separated from fibrous mat – Aroclor‐1268 at 36,000 mg/kg  • Layer 3: Asphalt‐saturated asbestos/PCB felt ‐ Aroclor‐1268 at  36,000 mg/kg) • Layer 4: A weatherproofing compounded bitumen (asphalt‐ based) intended to keep moisture and oxygen away from the  underlying asphalt. After Layers 2, 3, and 4 were applied to the sheet of steel, they were fused together in a heated press.  In  destructive tests these layers could not be separated ‐ Aroclor‐ 1268 36,000 mg/kg.  • Layer 5: Aluminum paint of an unknown resin base Aroclor‐1268  at 6,600 mg/kg 
  • 5. Signs of Wear • De‐lamination ‐ After Layers 2, 3, and 4 were  applied to the sheet of steel, they were fused  together in a heated press. There is some sign  the these layers are separating from the  metal. • Rust on the Mansard – There has been an  observation of rust on the mansard, indicating  that the coating is failing in some spots.
  • 6. Other Sources of Aroclor‐1260 and  1268 • Roof Sealant Samples indicated that Aroclor‐ 1260 was reported at 5.7 mg/kg, and Aroclor‐ 1268 was reported at 4.4 mg/kg.  • Flat Roof: The roof is a five‐ply built‐up roof  membrane.  The analytical results from the  roof materials revealed low concentrations of  Aroclor‐1260 and Aroclor‐1268 (0.9 and 0.5  mg/kg, respectively). 
  • 7. Other Sources of Aroclor‐1260 and  1268 (con’t) • Window Putty: Test results in 2003 showed  max. concentrations of Aroclor‐1260 and  Aroclor‐1268 (77 and 409 mg/kg,  respectively).  • Indoor Air: In 2002, samples of indoor air for  total PCBs were up to 0.03‐0.04 micrograms  per meter cubed • Indoor dust: In 2003, total measured at up to  370 mg/kg
  • 8. Other Sources of Aroclor‐1260 and  1268 (con’t) • Interior Structural Steel: The structural steel  paint had Aroclor‐1260 and Aroclor‐1268 at  concentrations up to 120 and 94 mg/kg,  respectively. Total PCBs were reportedly  present at concentrations from 65 to 214  mg/kg.  Paint showed signs of deterioration. 
  • 9. Other Sources of Aroclor‐1260 and  1268 (con’t) • Because roof sealant and window putty had  PCBs in them, we cannot rule out that other  buildings at Moffett that may have been built  during the same era would have similar  contamination levels. 
  • 10. Other Issues • Will we incur extra  mobilization/demobilization costs?  The EC/CA  estimated these costs at $197K and $95, respectively.  If I  add a 10% management fee plus 25% contingency, this  comes to $266K and $128 K respectively ($394,000).  This  would potentially be saved if everything was done at once. • Does the scaffolding need to be cleaned  prior after demolition?  Right now, the Navy  contractor is treating this conservatively, taping the  scaffolding removing the tape after demolition and  washing the scaffolding.  
  • 11. Conclusions • Begin to survey other potential sources of PCBs (1260 and  1268), and plan to remediate if needed. • Can demolition be delayed until a partner is ready to reside  Hangar 1? My opinion is that it can be delayed, but not for  very long.  Considerations include: – Evidence that the Hangar is leaching PCBs, although not violating a human health or environmental standard at  this time  – Extra contractual costs for Navy – EPA view that Hangar 1 poses a threat that must be  mitigated • If it is going to be delayed, we must act quickly so as to  avoid unnecessary penalties.