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Learning Analytics and Knowledge 2011, Banff<br />Learning Analytics and Exploratory Dialogue<br />Rebecca Ferguson 				@R...
Context of this research<br />www.open.ac.uk/sociallearn<br />Learning space tuned for enquiry and sensemaking:<br /><ul><...
Google gadgets
Mentoring
Open educational resource pathways
Analytics
Recommendation engine</li></li></ul><li>Hours of material…can LA help spot the critical, knowledge-building discourse?...<...
How many points in the webinar triggered learning/knowledge-building?<br />Data in this study taken from a 2 day OU confer...
Data source: OU online conference <br />Data in this study taken from a 2 day OU conference in Elluminate & Cloudworks: ht...
Disputational/Cumulative/Exploratory talk<br />Disputational talk<br />characterisedby disagreement and individualised dec...
Disputational/Cumulative/Exploratory talk<br />Exploratory talk<br /><ul><li>Partners engage critically but constructively...
Statements and suggestions are offered for joint consideration.
These may be challenged and counter-challenged, but challenges are justified and alternative hypotheses are offered.
Partners all actively participate and opinions are sought and considered before decisions are jointly made.
Compared with the other two types, in Exploratory talk knowledge is made more publicly accountable and reasoningis more vi...
Example from Mercer (classroom discussion)<br />George	I think she should be saying 'Did you steal my money from me?’<br /...
Indicators of exploratory talk?<br />
Low exploratory dialogue<br />(and text chat is often not well formed, making it hard to analyse with CompLing tools)<br />
Higher exploratory dialogue<br />
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Learning Analytics & Exploratory Dialogue

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1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge 2011, Banff

Rebecca Ferguson @R3beccaF
Simon Buckingham Shum @sbskmi

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Transcript of "Learning Analytics & Exploratory Dialogue"

  1. 1. Learning Analytics and Knowledge 2011, Banff<br />Learning Analytics and Exploratory Dialogue<br />Rebecca Ferguson @R3beccaF<br />Simon Buckingham Shum @sbskmi<br />SocialLearn ProjectThe Open University, UK<br />www.open.ac.uk/sociallearn<br />
  2. 2. Context of this research<br />www.open.ac.uk/sociallearn<br />Learning space tuned for enquiry and sensemaking:<br /><ul><li>Social networking
  3. 3. Google gadgets
  4. 4. Mentoring
  5. 5. Open educational resource pathways
  6. 6. Analytics
  7. 7. Recommendation engine</li></li></ul><li>Hours of material…can LA help spot the critical, knowledge-building discourse?...<br />
  8. 8. How many points in the webinar triggered learning/knowledge-building?<br />Data in this study taken from a 2 day OU conference in Elluminate & Cloudworks: http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2012<br />
  9. 9. Data source: OU online conference <br />Data in this study taken from a 2 day OU conference in Elluminate & Cloudworks: http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2012<br />
  10. 10. Disputational/Cumulative/Exploratory talk<br />Disputational talk<br />characterisedby disagreement and individualised decision making. Few attempts to pool resources, to offer constructive criticism or make suggestions. Disputational talk also has some characteristic discourse features - short exchanges consisting of assertions and challenges or counter assertions ('Yes, it is.' 'No it's not!').<br />Cumulative talk<br />in which speakers build positively but uncritically on what the others have said. Partners use talk to construct a 'common knowledge' by accumulation. Cumulative discourse is characterised by repetitions, confirmations and elaborations.<br />Mercer, N. (2004). Sociocultural discourse analysis: analysing classroom talk as a social mode of thinking. Journal of Applied Linguistics, 1(2), 137-168.<br />
  11. 11. Disputational/Cumulative/Exploratory talk<br />Exploratory talk<br /><ul><li>Partners engage critically but constructively with each other's ideas.
  12. 12. Statements and suggestions are offered for joint consideration.
  13. 13. These may be challenged and counter-challenged, but challenges are justified and alternative hypotheses are offered.
  14. 14. Partners all actively participate and opinions are sought and considered before decisions are jointly made.
  15. 15. Compared with the other two types, in Exploratory talk knowledge is made more publicly accountable and reasoningis more visible in the talk.</li></ul>Mercer, N. (2004). Sociocultural discourse analysis: analysing classroom talk as a social mode of thinking. Journal of Applied Linguistics, 1(2), 137-168.<br />
  16. 16. Example from Mercer (classroom discussion)<br />George I think she should be saying 'Did you steal my money from me?’<br />Tina Your go.<br />Sophie I think we should put 'I thought that my money's gone missing and I thought it was<br /> you'.<br />George 'I think it was you'. <br />Sophie Which one? <br />Tina Now what was it I was going to say, Um, um<br />GeorgeNo because she's thinking, so we need to do a thought. So we could write her saying<br />Sophie 'My money's gone missing so’<br />Tina I was going to say if we're doing the one where she's saying, this is saying not thinking<br />Sophie 'My money's gone do you know where it is?' <br />Tina No, on the saying one she could say<br />George You should be saying <br />Tina Like she could be thinking to say to Robert, she could be saying 'Do you know where's<br /> my money?’ ‘Do you know anything about my money going missing?’<br />GeorgeYeah, what, yeah that's good. When she's thinking i think she should be thinking 'Oh<br /> my money's gone missing and its definitely Robert.<br />Tina Yeah<br />SophieNo 'cos she's saying it to him isn't she? <br />Tina No she's thinking at the moment.<br /> <br />Explicit reasoning<br />Evaluation<br />Challenge<br />
  17. 17. Indicators of exploratory talk?<br />
  18. 18. Low exploratory dialogue<br />(and text chat is often not well formed, making it hard to analyse with CompLing tools)<br />
  19. 19. Higher exploratory dialogue<br />
  20. 20. Discriminating between participants (1 hr)<br />
  21. 21. Discriminating between sessions<br />Source data: webinar: http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/2994<br />
  22. 22. Discriminating between sessions<br />Key: Average Xploratory Words Minute Posts Each<br />Source data: webinar: http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/2994<br />
  23. 23. Summary<br /><ul><li>More nuanced than generic analytics
  24. 24. More nuanced than conference timetable
  25. 25. Importance of context
  26. 26. Different types of learning</li></li></ul><li>Future research needed in order to…<br /><ul><li>Check reliability of this form of analysis
  27. 27. Check validity of this form of analysis
  28. 28. Differentiate exploratory talk about content, tools, process, people
  29. 29. Investigate relationship between chat and audio/video
  30. 30. Automate process of analysis
  31. 31. Add more sophisticated text analysis</li></li></ul><li>More sophisticated discourse analysis on longer texts<br />OLnet Project: KMi seminar replay: http://olnet.org/node/512<br />
  32. 32. Future research needed in order to…<br /><ul><li>Check reliability of this form of analysis
  33. 33. Check validity of this form of analysis
  34. 34. Differentiate exploratory talk about content, tools, process, people
  35. 35. Investigate relationship between chat and audio/video
  36. 36. Automate process of analysis
  37. 37. Add more sophisticated text analysis</li></li></ul><li>Rebecca Ferguson<br />The Open University, UK<br />http://oro.open.ac.uk/view/person/rf2656.html<br />http://www.slideshare.net/R3beccaF<br />Simon Buckingham Shum<br />The Open University, UK<br />http://oro.open.ac.uk/view/person/sjb72.html<br />http://www.slideshare.net/sbs<br />
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