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UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments
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UCSF Life Sciences Week 2 Therapeutics: Customer Segments

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  1. Customer  Segments:   “Who  cares?  What  do  they  care   about?  How  much  do  they  care?”   Value Propositions Lean  Launchpad:  Therapeu=cs   Lean Launchpad: Digital Health   UCSF Entrepreneurship Center UCSF  Entrepreneurship  Center   October 1, 2013 October  8,  2013     Karl  Handelsman   Abhas Gupta, MD Codon  Capital     Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd Weekly  Office  Hours:  4:30-­‐5:30  before  class  
  2. Customer  Segments   Value Propositions Lean Launchpad: Digital Health This   UCSF Entrepreneurship Center Next   October 1, 2013 Week   Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd Week  
  3. Value Propositions Lean Launchpad: Digital Health Customer  Segments   UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 CONTEXT   Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  4. Overview   Move  to  External  Innova=on     Pharma/Large  Biotech/Generic/Specialty   Move  from  Ver=cal  Integra=on  to  Distributed  Opera=ons   CROs  fLean Launchpad: Digital Health  Clinical   or  toxicology,  Outsourced  chemistry,  CMC,   Customer  segments  in  a  given  company   UCSF Entrepreneurship Center  Therapeu=c  Head,  BOctober 1, 2013 usiness  Development,  Internal  Experts   Need  to  iden=fy  the  ten  companies  with  highest  interest   Value Propositions Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  5. How does your customer define pains and gains? Focus  on  internal  roles  at  company  (therapeu=c  head  vs  business)   What  are  the  pains/gains  you  offer   Internal  view  of  how  they  fit  today  and  future  in  your  market   Internal  view  of  what  they  have  covered   External  view  of  “high  impact”  areas  where  they  have  needs   External  view  of  “hot”  areas   Digital Health Lean Launchpad: Value Propositions     UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 REINFORCE:  Companies  have  divergent   and  conflic=ng  views,  and  they  change   Abhas Gupta, MD over  =me   Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  6. Risk  Is  Our  Business   Value Propositions Lean Launchpad: Digital Health UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  7. Today   •  Value  Proposi=on   Value Propositions Lean Launchpad: Digital Health •  BMC  evolu=on     Entrepreneurship Center UCSF October 1, 2013 Abhas Gupta, MD •  What  is  a  Customer  Segment   Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  8. You  are  searching   •  •  •  •  •  •  Draw  them  out   Don’t  worry  about  money   Find  out  what  they  care  about   Find  out  why  its  important   Share  something  interes=ng   Ask  them  what  you  are  missing   Value Propositions Lean Launchpad: Digital Health UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  9. Mistakes  to  avoid   •  Want  to  reach  across  the  job  func=ons  of  your   customer   Value Propositions –  Pharma  example:  Business  Development,   Lean Launchpad: Digital Health Technology  Scouts,  Therapeu=c  Area  Heads   UCSF Entrepreneurship Center •  Your  approach  is  October 1,pre-­‐compe==ve”     likely  “ 2013 Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  10. Value Propositions Lean Launchpad: Digital Health UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd ©  2012  Steve  Blank  
  11. Revenue  streams   •  Lots  of  different  business  models  that  offer   flexibility  to  match  your  opportunity   Value Propositions •  Non-­‐dilu=ve  money:  who  controls  it,  what  do   they  want?   Launchpad: Digital Health Lean •  No  5  year  hockey  Entrepreneurship Centerfind  significant   UCSF s=ck  plan,  must   October revenue  in  several  years  1, 2013 –  Example:  the  MVP  for  a  therapeu=c  must  drive  a   license  value  greater  than  the  cost,  ul=mately  you   may  pass  on  the  AbhasaGupta, MD to  invest  as  sole   deal   nd  con=nue   owner,  but  you  should  have  the  op=on   Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  12. The Value Proposition Canvas Designed for: On: Designed by: Day Iteration: Month Year No. Do they… Which savings would make your customer happy? Create savings that make your customer happy? Do something customers are looking for? (e.g. in terms of time, money and effort, …) (e.g. good design, guarantees, specific or more features, …) (e.g. in terms of time, money and effort, …) Produce outcomes your customer expects or that go beyond their expectations? Fulfill something customers are dreaming about? What outcomes does your customer expect and what would go beyond his/her expectations? (e.g. better quality level, more of something, less of something, …) Copy or outperform current solutions that delight your customer? (e.g. regarding specific features, performance, quality, …) Make your customer’s job or life easier? (e.g. flatter learning curve, usability, accessibility, more services, lower cost of ownership, …) Create positive social consequences that your customer desires? (e.g. help big achievements, produce big reliefs, …) (e.g. quality level, more of something, less of something, …) Produce positive outcomes matching your customers success and failure criteria? How do current solutions delight your customer? (e.g. specific features, performance, quality, …) (e.g. better performance, lower cost, …) Rank each gain according to its relevance to your customer. Is it substantial or is it insignificant? For each gain indicate how often it occurs. What would make your customer’s job or life easier? Help make adoption easier? (e.g. flatter learning curve, more services, lower cost of ownership, …) (e.g. lower cost, less investments, lower risk, better quality, performance, design, …) What positive social consequences does your customer desire? Rank each gain your products and services create according to its relevance to your customer. Is it substantial or insignificant? For each gain indicate how often it occurs. (e.g. makes them look good, increase in power, status, …) What are customers looking for? (e.g. makes them look good, produces an increase in power, status, …) (e.g. good design, guarantees, specific or more features, …) Gain Creators Gains Describe how your products and services create customer gains. How do they create benefits your customer expects, desires or would be surprised by, including functional utility, social gains, positive emotions, and cost savings? Describe the benefits your customer expects, desires or would be surprised by. This includes functional utility, social gains, positive emotions, and cost savings. What do customers dream about? (e.g. big achievements, big reliefs, …) Value Propositions Products & Services List all the products and services your value proposition is built around. Which products and services do you offer that help your customer get either a functional, social, or emotional job done, or help him/her satisfy basic needs? Which ancillary products and services help your customer perform the roles of: Buyer (e.g. products and services that help customers compare offers, decide, buy, take delivery of a product or service, …) How does your customer measure success and failure? (e.g. performance, cost, …) What would increase the likelihood of adopting a solution? (e.g. lower cost, less investments, lower risk, better quality, performance, design, …) Lean Launchpad: Digital Health Co-creator (e.g. products and services that help customers co-design solutions, otherwise contribute value to the solution, …) Transferrer (e.g. products and services that help customers dispose of a product, transfer it to others, or resell, …) Products and services may either by tangible (e.g. manufactured goods, face-toface customer service), digital/virtual (e.g. downloads, online recommendations), intangible (e.g. copyrights, quality assurance), or financial (e.g. investment funds, financing services). Pain Relievers Rank all products and services according to their importance to your customer. Are they crucial or trivial to your customer? Pains UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 Describe how your products and services alleviate customer pains. How do they eliminate or reduce negative emotions, undesired costs and situations, and risks your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done? Do they… Produce savings? (e.g. in terms of time, money, or efforts, …) Describe negative emotions, undesired costs and situations, and risks that your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done. Eliminate risks your customers fear? (e.g. financial, social, technical risks, or what could go awfully wrong, …) What does your customer find too costly? (e.g. takes a lot of time, costs too much money, requires substantial efforts, …) What makes your customer feel bad? (e.g. frustrations, annoyances, things that give them a headache, …) How are current solutions underperforming for your customer? (e.g. lack of features, performance, malfunctioning, …) What are the main difficulties and challenges your customer encounters? (e.g. understanding how things work, difficulties getting things done, resistance, …) Customer Job(s) Describe what a specific customer segment is trying to get done. It could be the tasks they are trying to perform and complete, the problems they are trying to solve, or the needs they are trying to satisfy. What functional jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. perform or complete a specific task, solve a specific problem, …) What social jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. trying to look good, gain power or status, …) What emotional jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. esthetics, feel good, security, …) What basic needs are you helping your customer satisfy? (e.g. communication, sex, …) Besides trying to get a core job done, your customer performs ancillary jobs in different roles. Describe the jobs your customer is trying to get done as: Buyer (e.g. trying to look good, gain power or status, …) Co-creator (e.g. esthetics, feel good, security, …) Transferrer (e.g. products and services that help customers dispose of a product, transfer it to others, or resell, …) Rank each job according to its significance to your customer. Is it crucial or is it trivial? For each job indicate how often it occurs. Outline in which specific context a job is done, because that may impose constraints or limitations. (e.g. while driving, outside, …) What negative social consequences does your customer encounter or fear? Make your customers feel better? Help your customers better sleep at night? (e.g. kills frustrations, annoyances, things that give them a headache, …) (e.g. by helping with big issues, diminishing concerns, or eliminating worries, …) Fix underperforming solutions? Limit or eradicate common mistakes customers make? (e.g. new features, better performance, better quality, …) (e.g. usage mistakes, …) What risks does your customer fear? Put an end to difficulties and challenges your customers encounter? Get rid of barriers that are keeping your customer from adopting solutions? (e.g. make things easier, helping them get done, eliminate resistance, …) (e.g. lower or no upfront investment costs, flatter learning curve, less resistance to change, …) (e.g. big issues, concerns, worries, …) (e.g. loss of face, power, trust, or status, …) Wipe out negative social consequences your customers encounter or fear? (e.g. loss of face, power, trust, or status, …) (e.g. financial, social, technical risks, or what could go awfully wrong, …) What’s keeping your customer awake at night? What common mistakes does your customer make? (e.g. usage mistakes, …) Rank each pain your products and services kill according to their intensity for your customer. Is it very intense or very light? What barriers are keeping your customer from adopting solutions? For each pain indicate how often it occurs. Risks your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done? Value Proposition Create one for each Customer Segment in your Business Model www.businessmodelgeneration.com Rank each pain according to the intensity it represents for your customer. Is it very intense or is it very light.? For each pain indicate how often it occurs. (e.g. upfront investment costs, learning curve, resistance to change, …) Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures Customer Segment @abhasguptamd Use in Conjunction with the Business Model Canvas Copyright of Business Model Foundry GmbH
  13. Customer  Must  Match  MVP   •  What  do  they  have  now,  what  creates  a  “must   have”   Value Propositions •  What  is  your  MVP  and  which  customers   Lean Launchpad: Digital Health should  be  most  interested/less  interested?   UCSF Entrepreneurship Center –  Therapeu=c  emphasis,  pipeline,  strategy  differ  by   October 1, 2013 company   •  Your  interviews  can  be  used  to  understand   Abhas Gupta, MD how  customers  view  each  others  needs   Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd  
  14. The Value Proposition Canvas Designed for: On: Designed by: Day Iteration: Month Year No. Do they… Which savings would make your customer happy? Create savings that make your customer happy? Do something customers are looking for? (e.g. in terms of time, money and effort, …) (e.g. good design, guarantees, specific or more features, …) (e.g. in terms of time, money and effort, …) Produce outcomes your customer expects or that go beyond their expectations? Fulfill something customers are dreaming about? (e.g. help big achievements, produce big reliefs, …) What outcomes does your customer expect and what would go beyond his/her expectations? (e.g. better quality level, more of something, less of something, …) Copy or outperform current solutions that delight your customer? (e.g. regarding specific features, performance, quality, …) Make your customer’s job or life easier? (e.g. flatter learning curve, usability, accessibility, more services, lower cost of ownership, …) Create positive social consequences that your customer desires? (e.g. quality level, more of something, less of something, …) Produce positive outcomes matching your customers success and failure criteria? How do current solutions delight your customer? (e.g. better performance, lower cost, …) (e.g. specific features, performance, quality, …) Help make adoption easier? Rank each gain according to its relevance to your customer. Is it substantial or is it insignificant? For each gain indicate how often it occurs. What would make your customer’s job or life easier? (e.g. flatter learning curve, more services, lower cost of ownership, …) (e.g. lower cost, less investments, lower risk, better quality, performance, design, …) What positive social consequences does your customer desire? Rank each gain your products and services create according to its relevance to your customer. Is it substantial or insignificant? For each gain indicate how often it occurs. (e.g. makes them look good, increase in power, status, …) What are customers looking for? Value Propositions (e.g. makes them look good, produces an increase in power, status, …) (e.g. good design, guarantees, specific or more features, …) Gain Creators Describe how your products and services create customer gains. How do they create benefits your customer expects, desires or would be surprised by, including functional utility, social gains, positive emotions, and cost savings? Products & Services List all the products and services your value proposition is built around. Which products and services do you offer that help your customer get either a functional, social, or emotional job done, or help him/her satisfy basic needs? Gains Describe the benefits your customer expects, desires or would be surprised by. This includes functional utility, social gains, positive emotions, and cost savings. What do customers dream about? (e.g. big achievements, big reliefs, …) How does your customer measure success and failure? (e.g. performance, cost, …) What would increase the likelihood of adopting a solution? (e.g. lower cost, less investments, lower risk, better quality, performance, design, …) Lean Launchpad: Digital Health Which ancillary products and services help your customer perform the roles of: Buyer (e.g. products and services that help customers compare offers, decide, buy, take delivery of a product or service, …) Co-creator (e.g. products and services that help customers co-design solutions, otherwise contribute value to the solution, …) Customer Job(s) Describe what a specific customer segment is trying to get done. It could be the tasks they are trying to perform and complete, the problems they are trying to solve, or the needs they are trying to satisfy. What functional jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. perform or complete a specific task, solve a specific problem, …) What social jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. trying to look good, gain power or status, …) What emotional jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. esthetics, feel good, security, …) What basic needs are you helping your customer satisfy? Transferrer (e.g. communication, sex, …) (e.g. products and services that help customers dispose of a product, transfer it to others, or resell, …) UCSF Entrepreneurship Center Pain Relievers Pains October 1, 2013 Products and services may either by tangible (e.g. manufactured goods, face-toface customer service), digital/virtual (e.g. downloads, online recommendations), intangible (e.g. copyrights, quality assurance), or financial (e.g. investment funds, financing services). Rank all products and services according to their importance to your customer. Are they crucial or trivial to your customer? Describe how your products and services alleviate customer pains. How do they eliminate or reduce negative emotions, undesired costs and situations, and risks your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done? Describe negative emotions, undesired costs and situations, and risks that your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done. Do they… Besides trying to get a core job done, your customer performs ancillary jobs in different roles. Describe the jobs your customer is trying to get done as: What does your customer find too costly? (e.g. takes a lot of time, costs too much money, requires substantial efforts, …) What makes your customer feel bad? (e.g. frustrations, annoyances, things that give them a headache, …) How are current solutions underperforming for your customer? (e.g. lack of features, performance, malfunctioning, …) What are the main difficulties and challenges your customer encounters? Produce savings? Eliminate risks your customers fear? (e.g. in terms of time, money, or efforts, …) (e.g. financial, social, technical risks, or what could go awfully wrong, …) Make your customers feel better? Co-creator (e.g. esthetics, feel good, security, …) Transferrer (e.g. products and services that help customers dispose of a product, transfer it to others, or resell, …) Rank each job according to its significance to your customer. Is it crucial or is it trivial? For each job indicate how often it occurs. Outline in which specific context a job is done, because that may impose constraints or limitations. (e.g. while driving, outside, …) What negative social consequences does your customer encounter or fear? Help your customers better sleep at night? (e.g. kills frustrations, annoyances, things that give them a headache, …) (e.g. understanding how things work, difficulties getting things done, resistance, …) Buyer (e.g. trying to look good, gain power or status, …) (e.g. by helping with big issues, diminishing concerns, or eliminating worries, …) (e.g. loss of face, power, trust, or status, …) Fix underperforming solutions? Limit or eradicate common mistakes customers make? (e.g. new features, better performance, better quality, …) (e.g. usage mistakes, …) What risks does your customer fear? Put an end to difficulties and challenges your customers encounter? Get rid of barriers that are keeping your customer from adopting solutions? (e.g. make things easier, helping them get done, eliminate resistance, …) (e.g. lower or no upfront investment costs, flatter learning curve, less resistance to change, …) (e.g. big issues, concerns, worries, …) Wipe out negative social consequences your customers encounter or fear? (e.g. loss of face, power, trust, or status, …) (e.g. financial, social, technical risks, or what could go awfully wrong, …) What’s keeping your customer awake at night? What common mistakes does your customer make? (e.g. usage mistakes, …) Rank each pain your products and services kill according to their intensity for your customer. Is it very intense or very light? Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures For each pain indicate how often it occurs. Risks your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done? Value Proposition Create one for each Customer Segment in your Business Model Rank each pain according to the intensity it represents for your customer. Is it very intense or is it very light.? For each pain indicate how often it occurs. What barriers are keeping your customer from adopting solutions? (e.g. upfront investment costs, learning curve, resistance to change, …) Customer Segment @abhasguptamd www.businessmodelgeneration.com Use in Conjunction with the Business Model Canvas Copyright of Business Model Foundry GmbH
  15. The Value Proposition Canvas Designed for: On: Designed by: Day Iteration: Month Year No. Do they… Which savings would make your customer happy? Create savings that make your customer happy? Do something customers are looking for? (e.g. in terms of time, money and effort, …) (e.g. good design, guarantees, specific or more features, …) (e.g. in terms of time, money and effort, …) Produce outcomes your customer expects or that go beyond their expectations? Fulfill something customers are dreaming about? What outcomes does your customer expect and what would go beyond his/her expectations? (e.g. better quality level, more of something, less of something, …) Copy or outperform current solutions that delight your customer? (e.g. regarding specific features, performance, quality, …) Make your customer’s job or life easier? (e.g. flatter learning curve, usability, accessibility, more services, lower cost of ownership, …) Create positive social consequences that your customer desires? (e.g. help big achievements, produce big reliefs, …) (e.g. quality level, more of something, less of something, …) Produce positive outcomes matching your customers success and failure criteria? How do current solutions delight your customer? (e.g. specific features, performance, quality, …) (e.g. better performance, lower cost, …) Rank each gain according to its relevance to your customer. Is it substantial or is it insignificant? For each gain indicate how often it occurs. What would make your customer’s job or life easier? Help make adoption easier? (e.g. flatter learning curve, more services, lower cost of ownership, …) (e.g. lower cost, less investments, lower risk, better quality, performance, design, …) What positive social consequences does your customer desire? Rank each gain your products and services create according to its relevance to your customer. Is it substantial or insignificant? For each gain indicate how often it occurs. (e.g. makes them look good, increase in power, status, …) What are customers looking for? (e.g. makes them look good, produces an increase in power, status, …) (e.g. good design, guarantees, specific or more features, …) Gain Creators Gains Describe how your products and services create customer gains. How do they create benefits your customer expects, desires or would be surprised by, including functional utility, social gains, positive emotions, and cost savings? Describe the benefits your customer expects, desires or would be surprised by. This includes functional utility, social gains, positive emotions, and cost savings. What do customers dream about? (e.g. big achievements, big reliefs, …) Value Propositions Products & Services List all the products and services your value proposition is built around. Which products and services do you offer that help your customer get either a functional, social, or emotional job done, or help him/her satisfy basic needs? Which ancillary products and services help your customer perform the roles of: Buyer (e.g. products and services that help customers compare offers, decide, buy, take delivery of a product or service, …) How does your customer measure success and failure? (e.g. performance, cost, …) What would increase the likelihood of adopting a solution? (e.g. lower cost, less investments, lower risk, better quality, performance, design, …) Lean Launchpad: Digital Health Co-creator (e.g. products and services that help customers co-design solutions, otherwise contribute value to the solution, …) Transferrer (e.g. products and services that help customers dispose of a product, transfer it to others, or resell, …) Products and services may either by tangible (e.g. manufactured goods, face-toface customer service), digital/virtual (e.g. downloads, online recommendations), intangible (e.g. copyrights, quality assurance), or financial (e.g. investment funds, financing services). Pain Relievers Rank all products and services according to their importance to your customer. Are they crucial or trivial to your customer? Pains UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 Describe how your products and services alleviate customer pains. How do they eliminate or reduce negative emotions, undesired costs and situations, and risks your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done? Do they… Produce savings? (e.g. in terms of time, money, or efforts, …) Describe negative emotions, undesired costs and situations, and risks that your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done. Eliminate risks your customers fear? (e.g. financial, social, technical risks, or what could go awfully wrong, …) What does your customer find too costly? (e.g. takes a lot of time, costs too much money, requires substantial efforts, …) What makes your customer feel bad? (e.g. frustrations, annoyances, things that give them a headache, …) How are current solutions underperforming for your customer? (e.g. lack of features, performance, malfunctioning, …) What are the main difficulties and challenges your customer encounters? (e.g. understanding how things work, difficulties getting things done, resistance, …) Customer Job(s) Describe what a specific customer segment is trying to get done. It could be the tasks they are trying to perform and complete, the problems they are trying to solve, or the needs they are trying to satisfy. What functional jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. perform or complete a specific task, solve a specific problem, …) What social jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. trying to look good, gain power or status, …) What emotional jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. esthetics, feel good, security, …) What basic needs are you helping your customer satisfy? (e.g. communication, sex, …) Besides trying to get a core job done, your customer performs ancillary jobs in different roles. Describe the jobs your customer is trying to get done as: Buyer (e.g. trying to look good, gain power or status, …) Co-creator (e.g. esthetics, feel good, security, …) Transferrer (e.g. products and services that help customers dispose of a product, transfer it to others, or resell, …) Rank each job according to its significance to your customer. Is it crucial or is it trivial? For each job indicate how often it occurs. Outline in which specific context a job is done, because that may impose constraints or limitations. (e.g. while driving, outside, …) What negative social consequences does your customer encounter or fear? Make your customers feel better? Help your customers better sleep at night? (e.g. kills frustrations, annoyances, things that give them a headache, …) (e.g. by helping with big issues, diminishing concerns, or eliminating worries, …) Fix underperforming solutions? Limit or eradicate common mistakes customers make? (e.g. new features, better performance, better quality, …) (e.g. usage mistakes, …) What risks does your customer fear? Put an end to difficulties and challenges your customers encounter? Get rid of barriers that are keeping your customer from adopting solutions? (e.g. make things easier, helping them get done, eliminate resistance, …) (e.g. lower or no upfront investment costs, flatter learning curve, less resistance to change, …) (e.g. big issues, concerns, worries, …) (e.g. loss of face, power, trust, or status, …) Wipe out negative social consequences your customers encounter or fear? (e.g. loss of face, power, trust, or status, …) (e.g. financial, social, technical risks, or what could go awfully wrong, …) What’s keeping your customer awake at night? What common mistakes does your customer make? (e.g. usage mistakes, …) Rank each pain your products and services kill according to their intensity for your customer. Is it very intense or very light? What barriers are keeping your customer from adopting solutions? For each pain indicate how often it occurs. Risks your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done? Value Proposition Create one for each Customer Segment in your Business Model www.businessmodelgeneration.com Rank each pain according to the intensity it represents for your customer. Is it very intense or is it very light.? For each pain indicate how often it occurs. (e.g. upfront investment costs, learning curve, resistance to change, …) Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures Customer Segment @abhasguptamd Use in Conjunction with the Business Model Canvas Copyright of Business Model Foundry GmbH
  16. Last  Weeks  Big  Idea   Strength  of   Value  Proposi3on   Launchpad: DigitalcHealth key  data   is   riteria  of   required  to  displace   UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 compe=ng  and  internal   programs  at  every  stage   Value Propositions Lean Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  17. This  Weeks  Big  Idea   You  must  find  a  CUSTOMER   SEGMENT  to  generate   Launchpad: Digital Health every  stage   revenue  at     Value Propositions Lean UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd
  18. Therapeu=c  CUSTOMER  SEGMENT  to   generate  revenue  at  every  stage   18  months  to  create  data  a  customer  segment  values:   Value Propositions Lean Launchpad: Digital Health UCSF Entrepreneurship Center Historically  the  best  outcomes  f2013therapeu=c   October 1, or   entrepreneurs  involved  early  collabora=ons!   You  must  always  have  deal  op=ons,  you  can   Abhas Gupta, MD choose  another  path.   Davidow Ventures Mohr @abhasguptamd
  19. Value Propositions Lean Launchpad: Digital Health UCSF Entrepreneurship Center October 1, 2013 My  Contact:  Put  LLP  in  Subject  Line  for  extra  points     KARL@CODONCAPITAL.COM   Abhas Gupta, MD Mohr Davidow Ventures @abhasguptamd

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