Trace Lessons Learned H4Dip Stanford 2016

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agile, mission model, corporate innovation, customer development, h4d, h4dip, hacking for diplomacy, lean, lean launchpad, lean startup, stanford, steve blank, state department

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Trace Lessons Learned H4Dip Stanford 2016

  1. Team TRACE US State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (J/TIP) A platform that allows brands to pool resources together to identify and remediate problematic factories down their supply chains. By reducing the cost of entry, businesses will be more willing to identify and fix forced labor. Brooke McEver | Eric Ehizokhale | Jose Torres | Christina Schiciano Sponsors: Kyle Ballard | Anna Patrick. Mentor: Beth Van Schaack Tech Mentor: Kevin Ray 85 interviews Assist the private sector in better understanding their labor supply chains such that they can push policies of responsible business down the chain. Initial Challenge Final Contribution
  2. Eric Ehizokhale Computer Science Brooke McEver Design Graduate Jose Torres Law School Fellow Meet Our Team! Christina Schiciano Political Science
  3. An estimated 21 million people are victims of slavery and forced labor throughout the world Risk is especially high in the apparel and fashion industry.
  4. How is a jacket made? Tier 1
  5. Tier 1 Tier 2 How is a jacket made?
  6. Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 How is a jacket made?
  7. Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Tier 4 How is a jacket made?
  8. Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Tier 4 Deeper tiers have more forced labor How is a jacket made?
  9. Week 1 Week 10 Data Collection Timeline of our progress: Weeks 1-3
  10. What we thought Supply chain managers in brands just need more data about the forced labor in their supply chains.
  11. What we thought Whom we talked to Supply chain managers in brands just need more data about the forced labor in their supply chains. 25 interviews with NGOs, supply chain managers, factory floor supervisors
  12. What we thought Whom we talked to What we learned Supply chain managers in brands just need more data about the forced labor in their supply chains. ● People care… ● ...but more data is not enough ● Most brands don’t have resources or expertise to know how to track the problem. ● Brands are not monolithic entities 25 interviews with NGOs, supply chain managers, factory floor supervisors
  13. Beneficiaries Mission AchievementMission Budget/Costs Buy-In/Support Deployment Value PropositionKey Activities Key Resources Key Partners -J/TIP -Sustainable Apparel Coalition Leadership -SAC brands willing to pilot initial projects -Remediation NGOs/firms (Verite, Impactt) 1. Supply Chain Managers 1. Corporate Social Responsibility Managers 1. Project managers / buyers Savings that can be shown from a cost/benefit per Money pooled that SAC provides NGOs with Brands in SAC pooling resources for a specific task (cleaning up spinning mills in Bangladesh) that would be efficient for all of them Sustainable Apparel Coalition and its members J/TIP -$25-50k to build/maintain TRACE platform -Researcher to calculate benefits for each project -Contracts between brands/remediator/SAC for projects -Developing TRACE platform -Identifying NGOs willing to remediate (Verite/Impactt/others -Use Higg Index to identify problematic factories) Deployment metrics Work with the SAC Integrate our platform with the SAC’s Higg Index and use that to find a common issue to pilot the first remediation project Execute a project focused on remediation of an issue. Show end results and tackle another project. - Mid-sized firms find cost/effective ways to monitor supply chain.NGOs can find “clients” and get more funding. - Cost savings and improved supply chain monitoring - Prototype testing: 100K -Amount of money firms are willing to further invest in their supply chains. Mission requires businesses to spend money, but we argue in a different way that ends up being cheaper for them -Launch: 75K -Continuing operations: 90K
  14. Week 1 Week 10 Data Collection Timeline of our progress: Weeks 4-7 NGOs
  15. Led to our first product idea, where supply chain managers could search for a geographical location and product, then find NGOs working in that space . . . Supply Chain Manager NGO I need help with I can help with
  16. Led to our first product idea, where supply chain managers could search for a geographical location and product, then find NGOs working in that space . . . Supply Chain Manager NGO I need help with I can help with
  17. . . . except feedback was mostly negative . . . 7 Supply Chain Manager Interviews, Weeks 5-6 “I don’t have time in my day to do this.” “I don’t trust random NGOs.” “What if the NGO names and shames us?” “Is there a cheaper way?”
  18. “Naming and shaming closes off the private sector from using their resources for good.” Matt — The Mekong Club
  19. Know the Chain Ranking of ICT Companies (Information and Communications Technology)
  20. Operating alone doesn’t work because… 1) There is a lack of resources. 2) Sticking your neck out makes you vulnerable.
  21. Working together allows firms to pool resources and save money, since many firms use the same factories. In week 7, we found a key partner in the Sustainable Apparel Coalition.
  22. Week 1 Week 10 Data Collection Timeline of our progress: Weeks 7-10 NGOs Shared Remediation
  23. “Give a Nobel Peace Prize to the first Fortune 500 company that names their ex-slaves and shows how they remediated their situation.” Rosey, ImpacttLimited
  24. Collaboration on audits helps save companies money. Collaboration on remediation helps workers escape forced labor. Final Product — Platform to remediate shared factories
  25. https://marvelapp.com/10f7ia1
  26. Next Steps 1. 2. 3. Remediation Best Practices Integration w/Higg Index Extension to New Industries

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