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4th Annual SBDC Veterans Conference, Tucson 10 18 13
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4th Annual SBDC Veterans Conference, Tucson 10 18 13

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Slide deck for the 4th Annual SBDC Veteran's Conference held on Friday, October 18th, 2013 at the Tucson Police Department's Westside Service Center. Over 100 Veterans attended!

Slide deck for the 4th Annual SBDC Veteran's Conference held on Friday, October 18th, 2013 at the Tucson Police Department's Westside Service Center. Over 100 Veterans attended!

Published in: Business, News & Politics

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  • Wow, is everyone excited!!! And there is much more to come…….we will be taking a half hour break so that you can network and especially so you can visit our Expo Hall. Over 20 different veteran resources are there for you to visit with.A lot of the value today is the networking and sharing that will take place. I also wanted to remind you to fill out your Question cards as the day progresses. Also you have an evaluation form in your folders that we will be collecting as you leave. This is an important part of how we use feedback to evaluate our trainings and events, so please be sure and complete that, again you may wish to do that as the day progresses. Wow, is everyone excited!!! And there is much more to come…….we will be taking a half hour break so that you can network and especially so you can visit our Expo Hall. Over 20 different veteran resources are there for you to visit with.A lot of the value today is the networking and sharing that will take place. I also wanted to remind you to fill out your Question cards as the day progresses. Also you have an evaluation form in your folders that we will be collecting as you leave. This is an important part of how we use feedback to evaluate our trainings and events, so please be sure and complete that, again you may wish to do that as the day progresses. Wow, is everyone excited!!! And there is much more to come…….we will be taking a half hour break so that you can network and especially so you can visit our Expo Hall. Over 20 different veteran resources are there for you to visit with.A lot of the value today is the networking and sharing that will take place. I also wanted to remind you to fill out your Question cards as the day progresses. Also you have an evaluation form in your folders that we will be collecting as you leave. This is an important part of how we use feedback to evaluate our trainings and events, so please be sure and complete that, again you may wish to do that as the day progresses. Wow, is everyone excited!!! And there is much more to come…….we will be taking a half hour break so that you can network and especially so you can visit our Expo Hall. Over 20 different veteran resources are there for you to visit with.A lot of the value today is the networking and sharing that will take place. I also wanted to remind you to fill out your Question cards as the day progresses. Also you have an evaluation form in your folders that we will be collecting as you leave. This is an important part of how we use feedback to evaluate our trainings and events, so please be sure and complete that, again you may wish to do that as the day progresses. Wow, is everyone excited!!! And there is much more to come…….we will be taking a half hour break so that you can network and especially so you can visit our Expo Hall. Over 20 different veteran resources are there for you to visit with.A lot of the value today is the networking and sharing that will take place. I also wanted to remind you to fill out your Question cards as the day progresses. Also you have an evaluation form in your folders that we will be collecting as you leave. This is an important part of how we use feedback to evaluate our trainings and events, so please be sure and complete that, again you may wish to do that as the day progresses. Wow, is everyone excited!!! And there is much more to come…….we will be taking a half hour break so that you can network and especially so you can visit our Expo Hall. Over 20 different veteran resources are there for you to visit with.A lot of the value today is the networking and sharing that will take place. I also wanted to remind you to fill out your Question cards as the day progresses. Also you have an evaluation form in your folders that we will be collecting as you leave. This is an important part of how we use feedback to evaluate our trainings and events, so please be sure and complete that, again you may wish to do that as the day progresses.
  • This is the big question. It has been shown that companies with business plans have a higher chance for success than those who do not. Whether it be a start up, first stage company or growing larger companies.
  • At the end I’ll provide some resources to review well written business plans and access to templates of which there is no shortage. Would recommend that you write the plan with the assistance of experts and/or a class.
  • Determine your use, it will help further define the many components of the plan. Bankers send folks to the SBDC if the client comes in only with financials and no business plan. This can be an abbreviated version, but they have to tell their story to their underwriter about you and they need you to provide this information. For investors, they need to know that you have covered every aspect we talk about today.
  • You will use your pitch throughout your company’s existence. You may be selling to a large company who wants to know more about you. You may be looking for access to capital, a lender or investor will want this information. Even in hiring an employee, they want to know about the company they may be joining.
  • This tells you, why this idea will work!
  • Who would buy your idea? This will help you prepare to do the right marketing study as you think about who your idea customer would be.
  • Knowing how your idea is both different and better than the competition gives you a big leg up! Not knowing or recognizing this is a risk.
  • Aware is informed! Also, you want to know what barriers to entry there may be. This will tell you. The whole putting the plan together that we’re covering today will show you how integral all the parts of the puzzle are. You may have worked on different parts at different times, but at the end of the day, it all needs to come together in a comprehensive, precise piece that covers all the important bases.
  • Connecting your idea to a message that goes to the right customers pulls together your demographic research and marketing strategies, is an important connection. While 3 distinct functions, you can see how they all come together. The right message to the right population through the right marketing approaches.
  • I love these examples, they’re attention getting, get to the point and tell a specific message. They know their market and what their market wants!
  • Now it’s selling your idea! Once you know who your ideal customers are, where they live and how they buy, you can put together an effective sales approach. For example, almost everyone needs to have a website. People think that it is because prospective customers will find them and buy from them through the website. That’s not it only, it’s a great form of credibility. Story about my book and the illustrator and a company that had a website that was confusing and didn’t tell a clear story. This can seal a deal!
  • You will have determined through your research the idea forms of advertising. There are some great resources, one which is free and quite beneficial is the Downtown Main Library, Deborah Brown. The whole 3rd floor is dedicated to business and you can gather some great marketing information. There are companies who can help you with assembling meaningful marketing lists such as Jan Knight of Bancroft Information Services.
  • Making your idea work! This area will provide the basis for your financial projections of how much operating dollars you will need.
  • It takes a TEAM to realize your idea! This area is so critical…….in talking with some investors recently, they said that they felt that management was #1. Of course a viable idea and the means to provide a healthy return on their investment was top of the list, but they said that without a great management team, they would wonder at the ability to bring the idea to both reality and success. Even with lenders who will tell you that numbers are number 1, management is certainly number 2. I can tell you as a banker, my motto was always, it’s people not numbers that pay me back!
  • How to fund your idea. The numbers are the last part of a business plan and that is because all the elements, the start up costs, the operating costs, the ability to repay debt, how much to spend on marketing, etc. all stem from the work you do before. When you get to this part, believe it or not, you're almost done! You’ll be pulling together all the information you have gathered and putting a numerical value to them. For advertising, the advertising budget, for staff, a personnel budget, for equipment, a budget, etc. Then from marketing and sales, what revenues look like and net margins. It all comes together here. It tells the story of how viable a company expects to be and the assumptions are critical to show how “real” the numbers are. Entrepreneurs are always accused of wearing “rose colored” glasses and they often need to be tempered with reality. This is again where you mentors, partners come into play to be the realists in the group.
  • I’d like to introduce David Florez who is representing US Bank, our Presenting Sponsor! Thank you David for helping make today possible.
  • And now it is time for lunch! And will you enjoy this….Food is prepared for us by Delectablies Restaurant Catering. Donna DiFior was one of our 2013 Statewide AZSBDC Success Award Winners. There is food in both rooms. And in the auditorium, if you will file out both sides and then you’ll come towards the center to pick up your lunch and get drinks. We will have tables of food and drink also in the Expo room so we can get everyone served during this 25 minutes.Another reminder about question cards, and evaluations. Susann will be at the back of the room collecting your questions.
  • Make sure to announce that we’ll be collecting the question cards, so please pass them to the outside aisle (some people may be leaving early…)
  • In your folders you have “The Team Makes the Difference” and this says it all. You have strong expertise to support you in starting and/or growing your business with our team.
  • Thank you everyone for attending today, and a reminder to hand in your evaluations. In closing, we have an inspirational video to send you on your way.
  • Thank you everyone for attending today, and a reminder to hand in your evaluations. In closing, we have an inspirational video to send you on your way.
  • Transcript

    • 1. WELCOME! #SBDC4thVets
    • 2. AGENDA 8:30-9:00 Registration & Networking 9:00 Welcome! Ellen Kirton, SBDC Director 9:10 Presentation by University of Arizona ROTC Color Guard 9:20 National Anthem by Martha McSally, Colonel, United States Air Force, Retired 11:05 “Pitch AND Plan”: Tim Bruchman, MAC/WBC 11:35 “Access to Capital”: Karen Burns, MAC/SBDC 12:00 David Florez, US Bank. Presenting Sponsor 12:00 – 12:30 Lunch Break 12:30 Keynote Speaker: Paul Smiley: 9:27 Tony Penn, President & CEO, United Way President , Sonoran Technology & Professional of Tucson, Introduction of Mayor Rothschild Services, LLC 9:30 Opening Remarks by Mayor Jonathan 1:15 Michael Tucker: “Your Personal Branding” Rothschild, City of Tucson 1:45 “Supporting Small Business” – Office of 9:45 “Transferrable Skills”: Joy Hopper, Congressman Ron Barber DMAFB 2:00 Success Panel: Sean Collins, Mark 10:15 “Doing Business with the Government” Beres, Ray Montoya Steve Hart, SBA, Sr. Area Manager 2:45 Wrap up and Closing Remarks by Ellen 10:35-11:05 Kirton, SBDC Director Morning Break Visit EXPO Resources located in the Expo Hall!
    • 3. Ellen Kirton Director, MAC Small Business Development Center WELCOME!
    • 4. AGENDA 8:30-9:00 Registration & Networking 9:00 Welcome! Ellen Kirton, SBDC Director 9:10 Presentation by University of Arizona ROTC Color Guard 9:20 National Anthem by Martha McSally, Colonel, United States Air Force, Retired 11:05 “Pitch AND Plan”: Tim Bruchman, MAC/WBC 11:35 “Access to Capital”: Karen Burns, MAC/SBDC 12:00 David Florez, US Bank. Presenting Sponsor 12:00 – 12:30 Lunch Break 12:30 Keynote Speaker: Paul Smiley: 9:27 Tony Penn, President & CEO, United Way President , Sonoran Technology & Professional of Tucson, Introduction of Mayor Rothschild Services, LLC 9:30 Opening Remarks by Mayor Jonathan 1:15 Michael Tucker: “Your Personal Branding” Rothschild, City of Tucson 1:45 “Supporting Small Business” – Office of 9:45 “Transferrable Skills”: Joy Hopper, Congressman Ron Barber DMAFB 2:00 Success Panel: Sean Collins, Mark 10:15 “Doing Business with the Government” Beres, Ray Montoya Steve Hart, SBA, Sr. Area Manager 2:45 Wrap up and Closing Remarks by Ellen 10:35-11:05 Kirton, SBDC Director Morning Break Visit EXPO Resources located in the Expo Hall!
    • 5. Marine Corps League Color Guard
    • 6. Martha McSally, Colonel United States Air Force, Retired. Singing the National Anthem
    • 7. “LIVE UNITED” Tony Penn, President & CEO, United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona
    • 8. The Honorable Jonathan Rothschild Mayor of the City of Tucson
    • 9. Joy Hopper, Community Readiness Consultant, DavisMonthan Air Force Base
    • 10. Steve Hart, Small Business Administration, Sr. Area Manager
    • 11. FEDERAL CONTRACTING REGISTRATION A GUIDE TO REGISTERING FOR FEDERAL CONTRACTING Where to get help and assistance…
    • 12. Where to get help and assistance… SBDC for steps 1-3 Small Business Development Center PTAC for step 4 Procurement Technical Assistance Centers Follow these steps… Step 1 Eligibility for Federal Contracting Is your business legally formed and licensed? Do you meet SBA “small business” definition? Does your company meet SBA size standards? Step 2 Register for Federal Contracting Obtain DUNS number Determine NAICS codes Determine SIC codes Optional, obtain evaluations Register with SAM Step 3 Additional Certifications (Optional) HUBZone Certification 8(a) Business Development Small Business Certification Women-Owned Small Business Federal Contract Program Veteran-Owned Businesses Disadvantaged Businesses Native Americans Alaskan Owned Corporations Native Hawaiian Owned Corporations Step 4 Procurement Technical Assistance Finding Solicitations and Procurement Opportunities How to Prepare a Government Bid or Proposal Response Assistance in Pursuing Government Certifications Obtaining Payment and Cash Flow Government Procurement Training Marketing to the Government Subcontracting and Teaming
    • 13. STEP 1 – ELIGIBILITY FOR FEDERAL CONTRACTING Use the following section to determine if your business is eligible to register for federal contracting. Is your business legally formed and licensed? (more info click here) Business may be a sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, or any other legal form. Articles of Organization filed with the Arizona Corporation Commission Obtain a Federal Tax ID Number (see the IRS website at TIN/EIN) Obtain all necessary state and local licenses and permits Establish a business banking account Do you meet the SBA “small business” definition? (more info click here) Is organized for profit Has a place of business in the US Operates primarily within the U.S. or makes a significant contribution to the U.S. economy Is independently owned and operated Is not dominant in its field on a national basis
    • 14. STEP 1 – ELIGIBILITY FOR FEDERAL CONTRACTING (continued) Does your company meet SBA size standards? (more info click here) All federal agencies must use SBA size standards for contracts identified as small business You need to select NAICS codes that best describe your business. Go to the NAICS section of the Bureau of the Census website. Identify the NAICS code(s) that best describe(s) your business activities. Also see Identifying Industry Codes for more helpful resources. Determine if the business meets size standards for the selected NAICS codes. Using the Table of Small Business Size Standards. Match your NAICS code(s) with the appropriate size standard(s). If you answered yes to all the questions listed above, then your company is eligible to register for federal contracting.
    • 15. STEP 2 – REGISTER FOR FEDERAL CONTRACTING If your company is eligible, use the following steps to register for federal contracting. 1. Obtain a DUNS Number (more info click here) You will need to obtain a Dun & Bradstreet DUNS number. This is a unique nine-digit identification number for each physical location of your business. The assignment of a D-U-N-S Number is FREE for all businesses required to register with the federal government for contracts or grants. Click here to obtain a free DUNS number. 2. Find the NAICS Codes for Your Company (more info click here) This step should already have been completed above. The code classifies the economic sector, industry and country of your business. For Federal contracting purposes, you will need to identify in SAM all the NAICS codes (industries) applicable to your business. Click here to identify your NAICS codes.
    • 16. STEP 2 – REGISTER FOR FEDERAL CONTRACTING (continued) 3. Find the SIC Codes for Your Company (more info click here) A SIC code is the Standard Industrial Classification number listed in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual which is published by the Office of Management and Budget. SIC codes are used by the Federal Government to identify and classify specific categories of business activity that represent the primary line of business of a firm. SBA size standards are based on SIC codes. Click here to identify your SIC codes. 4. Optional, Obtain Past Performance Evaluations Businesses interested in getting on the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) Schedule for contracts should obtain an Open Ratings, Inc. Past Performance Evaluation. Open Ratings, a Dun & Bradstreet Company, conducts an independent audit of customer references and calculates a rating based upon a statistical analysis of various performance data and survey responses. While some GSA Schedule solicitations contain the form to request an Open Ratings Past Performance Evaluation, vendors may also submit an online request directly to Open Ratings. Click here to obtain your PPE.
    • 17. STEP 2 – REGISTER FOR FEDERAL CONTRACTING (continued) 5. Register your Business with the System of Award Management (SAM) (more info click here) You need to register your business with the federal government's System of Award Management (SAM), the primary database of vendors doing business with the federal government. Federal Acquisitions Regulations (FAR) require all prospective vendors to be registered in SAM prior to the award of a contract, basic agreement, basic ordering agreement, or blanket purchase agreement. Below are some of the items that you will need in order to complete registration processes. Your NAICS codes, Your Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Your Federal Tax Identification Number (TIN or EIN) Your Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes Optionally, your Product Service codes, Optionally, your Federal Supply Classification codes Click here to register with SAM.
    • 18. STEP 3 – ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATIONS (OPTIONAL) The following are additional certifications and registrations for federal and state contracting. Small Business Certifications & Audiences (more info click here) As the owner of a small business, you may qualify for specific SBA programs based on a variety of factors. Review the information below and determine which programs could apply to you or your geographic place of business. HUBZone Certification Native Americans 8(a) Business Development Small Business Certification Women-Owned Small Business Federal Contract Program Veteran-Owned Businesses Disadvantaged Businesses Alaskan Owned Corporations Native Hawaiian Owned Corporations Register Your Business With State Agencies (more info click here)
    • 19. STEP 4 – PROCUREMENT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE Once your company is registered and certified (optional) PTAC can assist you in the following ways. AZPTAC Procurement Specialists work with small business owners to help them realize the opportunities that exist in the realm of government contracting and procurement. Whether you are looking for information on how to get certified, how to find and identify contracting (and sub-contracting) opportunities or how to bid and contract for work, AZPTAC is here to help. Finding Solicitations and Procurement Opportunities How to Prepare a Government Bid or Proposal Response Assistance in Pursuing Government Certifications Obtaining Payment and Cash Flow Government Procurement Training Marketing to the Government Subcontracting and Teaming
    • 20. What is PTAC? • PTAC is a Procurement Technical Assistance Center • Expands the Amount of Businesses Capable of Participating in Government Marketplace • Works collaboratively with SBDC counselors
    • 21. WELCOME! #SBDC4thVets
    • 22. Kino Veterans' Workforce Center Southern Arizona VA Health Care System Active Living Home Care Tucson’s Small Business Resources
    • 23. Tim Bruchman, Business Trainer and Counselor, Women’s Business Center of Southern Arizona
    • 24. Development of a Business Plan “Pulling It All Together” Presented by Tim Bruchman Women's’ Business Center of Southern Arizona 24
    • 25. Start with the End in Mind! Building a business plan takes commitment, perseverance and belief in what you are trying to accomplish. Remember that the plan ultimately is yours! Make it your own. All your preparation will end up eventually pulled together on one page called an “Executive Summary”. This should not be a “binder” that you put on your back shelf to gather dust, it should be a living breathing document. 25
    • 26. Great Resources!
    • 27. Why do you need a business plan? • For yourself – There is a great deal of time and effort involved in a well prepared business plan. And one of the important goals is that it become an important operating document for the company, which is then regularly reviewed and updated. • For others – You need a business plan to get it funded!! And a strong business plan can help you attract the right hires as well as partners/investors. 27
    • 28. How do you build a business plan? Today we will be learning how to first be sure to have a “Pitch” that will get the essence of your message out. To potential partners, investors, lenders, etc. Then you next add details that become an operating plan for success and can also help you look for access to capital/funding. Most importantly, once completed, put into practice all that hard work! 28
    • 29. Where do you use a business plan? For yourself – this is a blueprint for either starting your business, growing your business or improving your business. Also, once completed, it becomes an important comparison to actual tool For others – A lender will require many elements of a business plan to consider advancing you a loan An investor who can help fund your start-up or growth Your management team. This can be a great roadmap they can not only follow but participate in it’s success 29
    • 30. “PITCH-THEN-PLAN” “A technique that quickly translates business ideas into business plans…” 30
    • 31. Why Pitch-Then-Plan? • A good business plan is a detailed version of a “pitch” • As opposed to a pitch being a distilled version of a business plan • If you get the pitch right, you’ll get the plan right ALSO… 31
    • 32. Why The Pitch First? • Your pitch initially is more important than your business plan, as it will determine whether your idea has merit early on by those reviewing it • And/or it can generate further interest. Few sophisticated investors will read an entire business plan as the first step • A pitch is easier to fix than a business plan because it contains less text. 32
    • 33. No “team of one” This false belief in a “team-of-one” could be the cause for the massive failure rate of small businesses in the first five years. If you want to maximize the chances of success in starting a business, there is probably only one significant factor to leverage: the person who is most capable of enlisting the support of others, the teambuilder, is the most likely to succeed 33
    • 34. The Business Plan “Pitch” Your “pitch” should contain no more than 10 PowerPoint slides (10/20/30 rule*) •1) The Idea •3) The Customer •5) The Message •7) The Inner Workings •9) The Money Forecast 2) The Business Model 4) The Competition 6) The Sales Approach 8) The Management Team 10) The Next Steps 34
    • 35. #1 The Idea • Talk about the opportunity you have discovered and the big idea you have for the business • All good ideas share at least one of three goals: – They make life for the customer easier (efficiency) – They make life for the customer better (effectiveness) – They allow the customer to do new things (innovation) 35
    • 36. #2 The Business Model The purpose of the business & how it makes money! While the “idea” described the opportunity you discovered, the business model answers the question “So what?” and “How?”
    • 37. The Business Model (Continued…) • A business model describes the purpose of the business and how it makes money. • Talks about the timeless reason why your business should exist beyond just making money • Complete this sentence, “The purpose of our business is to…” • Talk about how you make money and how you deliver your idea to the customer
    • 38. Business Model Examples • Apple iTunes: The purpose of Apple iTune is to let people enjoy music everywhere, anytime. We sell popular music downloads over the internet for $.99 per song. We pay music label $.82 per download leaving us with a margin of $.17 per song (HOW!). • Microsoft: The purpose of Microsoft is to put a computer on every desk and in every pocket. We sell computer operating systems and application programs by charging a software license fee on each copy (HOW!) 38
    • 39. #3 The Customer • Ask yourself, “Who has my money in their pockets?” • Talk about the groups of customers (“target markets”) that will be attracted to your idea. • Ask: – Who do we serve? – What do we know about them? 39
    • 40. The Customer (target markets) • Specific Example: The customer for Chipotle’s is between the ages of 25 and 54 and has a desire for a healthy menu without sacrificing speed. They desire: 1) Focus on freshness with products made to order 2) Focus on innovative flavors 3) Focus on consumer choice extended to complete control of product content 4) Focus on health, including whole-grain, and organic, as well as trans-fat and MSG free ingredients 40
    • 41. The Customer: General Examples • Our customers are busy executives and sales persons who frequently travel more than 20 weeks a year. They are road warriors who seek products that express their positions of status and achievement. • Our customers are high-school students who need additional teaching help outside the traditional classroom. They seek products that increase their self-confidence relative to the performance of their peers. 41
    • 42. #4 The Competition • Start out by identifying (by name) your three to four most significant “direct” competitors and the story that they are trying to tell in a few words or phrases. • Then describe precisely how you are uniquely different. • Describe yourself differently than your competitors, if you do, then you’re saying you’re different and are “differentiating” yourself! 42
    • 43. The Competition (Continued) • Talk about the three to four main (direct) competitors trying to win your customers. • Never dismiss the competition. • Everyone wants to hear why you’re good, not why the competition is bad. • Talk about the story each competitor tells and then talk about how your story is either different or more important. 43
    • 44. The Competition Example: Minute Clinic has three competitors: • The emergency room is always available and can treat any number of illnesses, but is expensive and slow (direct) • Local primary care physicians treat a large number of illnesses but are available limited hours (direct) • Off-the-shelf diagnostic tests are inexpensive but can diagnose only one condition per test. We are fast and conveniently located in a pharmacy and can treat 12 of the most common ailments (indirect) 44
    • 45. Importance of Competition: Many entrepreneurs believe that investors want to hear that the venture has no competition. Unfortunately, sophisticated investors reach one or both of the following conclusions if entrepreneurs make such claims: 1) There’s no competition because… there is no market. If there were a market, there would be others trying to win it! or…. 2) The founders are so naive they can’t even use Google to figure out ten other companies are doing the same thing! 45
    • 46. #5 The Message Once you have identified the various competitors out there trying to win your customers and the stories they are telling, it’s time to talk about the message you will deliver to the customer 46
    • 47. A Great “Message”… is A Great Story: The bottom line is this: Don’t try to change someone’s worldview, instead, identify a population (TARGET MARKET!) with a certain worldview and frame your message in terms of that worldview. Most often you’re charged with competing with someone who has already succeeded with a message that’s taken hold. The best alternative strategy is to find a different community, with a different worldview that wants to hear a different message (“BLUE OCEAN”). If you can build your entire organization around delivering a particular story, you’ve dramatically increased the chances that this story will actually get told (and be SOLD!). 47
    • 48. Examples of Messages That Work LifeLock: “My name is Todd Davis. This is my social security number 457-55-5462. Yes, that really is my social security number. No I'm not crazy. I'm just sure our system works. Just like we have with mine, LifeLock helps protect your personal information. And it's GUARANTEED.“ Subway: “Meet Jared. He used to weigh 425 pounds, but today he weighs only 180 thanks to what he calls the “Subway diet.” Eating only two Subway Sandwiches a day combined with an exercise program worked for Jared. We’re not saying it will work for you. But it worked for Jared. Subway—Eat Fresh.” The Nature Conservatory helps protect precious landscapes by buying them.” Instead of buying faceless, statistical acres it talks about “landscapes.” Five landscapes per year sounds more realistic than 2 million acres and it’s more concrete.
    • 49. #6 The Sales Approach “Strategy” Talk about why and who you are going to reach with your message. Convince your audience that you have an effective go-tomarket approach that won’t break the bank. Your task here is to simply decide what leverage points and contact spheres exist for talking with your customers and to identify what types of media you can master and are best suited for your message and for your customer. 49
    • 50. The Sales Approach – Promotional “Tactics”  Public Relations  Media Relations  Press Kits  Newsletters  Press Releases  Special Events  Speaking Engagements  Sponsorships  Community Relations and Philanthropy 50
    • 51. The Sales Approach - Advertising  Websites  Social Media  Email Advertising  Direct Mail  Trade Shows  Yellow Pages  Newspaper  Magazines  Radio  Television and Cable  Outdoor Advertising  Specialty Advertising 51
    • 52. #7 Inner Workings For this section, you talk about the work you do and how you make things. It’s a discussion about the internal operations of your business •People •Places •Things •Time 52
    • 53. Inner Workings 1) People: How many, skill sets, full or part time, salaried/hourly, pay ranges, roles & responsibilities 2) Places: Facility, distribution 3) Things: Machinery, equipment, furniture. Cost and use 4) Time: How to complete an order? Hours of operation. Time to get product/service to clients 53
    • 54. Inner Workings Examples Tele-Health Services will require a 24x7x365 operations center based in Columbus to serve Southern Indiana cities. In order to deal with the demand of securing 2,000 new customer accounts each year, we will require 5 Service Technicians for installation (8AM5PM), 6 Maintenance & Training Staff to support the central facility (in 3 shifts), 1 Administrative Support Staff, and an IT Staff person. All remote monitoring equipment will be leased on a month basis from Teleproducts USA for $17.50 per month. Tortillas Supremas will be located in a leased building in Indianapolis, Indiana. Two tortilla making machines and two vehicles for delivery will be leased. Two full time employees will work the tortilla making machine. Two employees, working 20 hours per week at $9.00 per hour, will deliver the finished product. 54
    • 55. #8 The Management Critical Issue! 55
    • 56. The Management Team For this section, talk about the key players who will manage the business. For each management team member, you should briefly mention their credentials (why they are qualified to run this business) and mention their roles and responsibilities. Make sure that your team completes the “management trinity”: 1) Who will oversee the work—management expertise? 2) Who will oversee sales—marketing expertise? 3) Who will take care of the money—financial expertise? 56
    • 57. The Management Team (Continued) Talk about the key players who will manage your business. Does not have to be employees! These could include: Board of directors ? Advisory boards Consultants Major investors ? Also, talk about any professionals like lawyers, accountants, bankers, or insurance agents that will assist you in running the business. 57
    • 58. #9 The Money Talk about how much money you need to get started or if in business, how much you need to get to the next stage. List the major categories of costs and estimate their amount Talk about the money you expect to take in during the first or current year. Show how you came up with that number (units times prices) Assumptions are critical! Talk about the money you expect to spend out during this year Think about people, product costs, space, equipment, etc.
    • 59. The Money Examples Premier Uniforms requires $150,000 in initial start-up funds roughly broken down into $20K for working capital, $100K in inventory, and $30K in equipment and leasehold improvements. We anticipate acquiring 120 accounts in the first year (10 per month) with an average annual contract amount of $15,000 per account resulting in $180,000 in annual sales. Our expenses are primarily payroll (50%), rent and facilities (30%), and administrative expenses (20%) which should total approximately $120,000. We are projecting a first year profit of $60,000. 59
    • 60. Projections Strategy Use a bottom-up model. Here’s an example: • Each salesperson can make ten phone sales a day that get through to a prospect • There are 240 working days per year • Five percent of the sales calls will convert within six months • Each successful sale will bring in $240 worth of business • We can bring on board five sales people • Ten calls/day X 240 days/year X 5% success rate X $240/sale X 5 salespeople = • $144,000 in sales in the first year 60
    • 61. Lenders/Investors Needs • Lenders want to see: – Seasoned cash flow – Good credit scores – Collateral • Investors want to see: – Return on their investment – Viable product/service – Quality Management Team who can get it done 61
    • 62. #10 The Next Steps – The Plan Translate all this into actions… or they forever stay ideas and only dreams…
    • 63. Essential Elements of a Good Business Plan What are the key elements of a business plan? From market analysis to your company financials, this guide walks you through the essential components of your plan, including how to develop a funding request. • Business Plan Executive Summary Your executive summary is a snapshot of your business plan as a whole and touches on your company profile and goals. This section offers tips on what to include and how to keep it brief and succinct. • Market Analysis Read about the specific industry, market and competitive analysis information you should conduct and include in your plan. • Company Description What do you do? What differentiates your business? Which markets do you serve? Get tips on how to present this information. • Organization & Management All businesses are structured differently. Find out how best to describe your organization and its management structure, regardless of its size. • Marketing & Sales Management How do you plan to market your business? What is your sales strategy? Read more about how to present this information in your plan. • Service or Product Line What do you sell? How does it benefit your customers? What is the product lifecycle? Do you plan R&D activities? Get tips on how to tell the "story" of your product or service. • Funding Request If you are seeking funding for your business, find out what information you need to include in your plan to ensure success. • Financial Projections If you need funding, providing financial projections to back up your request is critical. Find out what information you need to include in your financial projections for your small business. • Appendix An appendix is optional, but a useful place to include information such as resumes, permits, leases, and so on. Find out what else you should include in your appendix.
    • 64. Resources There are some great resources for assembling your Business Plan if you haven’t already started, want to revise or finish what you have started or need to have ready for submission for access to capital, etc. www.sba.gov - You will have access to an outline and then can also click on each of the elements of the plan. Microbusiness Advancement Center/WBC Has a 10 week/session course on writing a professional, complete business plan, as well as one on one, no cost professional business counseling. – MAC Small Business Development Center – one on one, no cost professional counseling to work with you not only on the plan itself, but how to implement it effectively and successfully.
    • 65. Resources (Continued) In addition, you can go online to the Pima County Library (www.library.pima.gov) and see sample business plans. All you need is your library card. You go to the Home Page and type in Business Plans. There are a good variety. It is like opening a book online. Remember, at the end of the day, by building a business plan, the most helpful thing that will occur first, is that YOU will be convinced that you have a plan that can work before you show it to anyone else. Also, be sure to have a team! This was reiterated a number of times, because there are many areas where an expert can definitely help in ALL sections of the business plan.
    • 66. Contact Information Microbusiness Advancement Center Women's Business Center of Southern Arizona Tim Bruchman tbruchman@mac-sa.org 520-620-1241 x 101 68
    • 67. Thank You for Your Service Veterans!
    • 68. Karen Burns, Business Analyst, Loan Specialist, Small Business Development Center
    • 69. Presenting Sponsor David Florez, Branch Manager  Business Financing & Credit  The solutions you need to help your business prosper  Supporting Veterans in our community Visit our Expo Table to Learn More!
    • 70. #SBDC4thVets
    • 71. Kino Veterans' Workforce Center Southern Arizona VA Health Care System Active Living Home Care Tucson’s Small Business Resources
    • 72. KEYNOTE SPEAKER Paul Smiley, President , Sonoran Technology & Professional Services, LLC (Lt. Colonel United States Air Force, Retired.)
    • 73. Michael Tucker, CEO, Social Mobile Buzz. International Speaker & Trainer, Social Mobile Marketer, & Social Entrepreneur. www.socialmobilebuzz.com
    • 74. Personal Brand Building for Veterans By: Michael Tucker CEO, Social Mobile Buzz
    • 75. Overview • • • • • What is Branding What is a personal brand 4 Step Personal Branding Process Using social media in personal branding How to become the expert employers are looking for
    • 76. What is a brand • Brand "Name, term, design, symbol, or any other feature (promise, reason to buy & emotion) that identifies one seller's good or service as distinct from those of others. • The question is… “what can I count on from your product and how does it make me feel?” • What’s your story?
    • 77. What experience do of these Brands create for you?
    • 78. What Experience does the Brand “Veteran” Create for others?
    • 79. What is a Personal Brand?
    • 80. Personal branding is… • Who we are and how we communicate that “beingness” to others http://youtu.be/qvY0BdJ8KV4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APwfZYO1 di4
    • 81. Personal Branding is Multidimensional… • It's your reputation, the size and strength of your network, and what unique value you can contribute to a company or your clients. – – – – – – – The attitude and values you hold How much you can be trusted to keep your word How you treat others How you dress How you speak Who you spend time with Where you work, travel, vacation
    • 82. The Personal Branding Process
    • 83. 4 steps in the Personal Branding Process (Me 2.0) • Discover spend time learning about yourself, your values, personal mission, and unique attributes. – Start by asking yourself "what do I want to be known for, and then select a niche so that you can position yourself in the marketplace. • Create: Blog, website, business card, resume, video resume, reference document, cover letter, portfolio, social network profiles, or a combination. Your brand must be consistent across all platforms
    • 84. 4 steps in the Personal Branding Process (cont’d) • Communicate: Communicate your brand by attending professional networking events, writing articles for magazines and media sites, commenting on blogs, connecting with people on social networks, and reaching out to the press. • Maintain: As you grow, mature, and accelerate in your career, update your brand." Monitor your brand online to ensure all conversations about you are positive and factual. Establish a Google Alert for your name.
    • 85. Group Activity
    • 86. Group Activity (Part 1) 1. Choose a partner 2. Partner A simply talk to partner B about any topic related to yourself 3. Switch 4. How well do you feel you know your partner
    • 87. Group Activity (Part 2) • Make a list of the following 1. 2. 3. 4. What you’re most proud of What inspires you 1 Goal for this year Support you need to accomplish it
    • 88. If you do not clearly define your personal brand others will do it for you…
    • 89. Everyone is an expert at something. However, You must acknowledge your expertise and let others know through your actions…
    • 90. Using Social Media in the Personal Branding Process
    • 91. Facebook • Use images in post that support your brand • Create and share content that display’s your expertise • Participate in groups related to your area of expertise • Attend and share information from events related to your area of expertise
    • 92. LinkedIn • Make sure your profile is fully completed and clearly labels your expertise • Post videos and work samples (where appropriate) • Contribute to groups and answer industry related questions • Offer and request recommendations • Add plug-ins to display the depth of expertise
    • 93. Identifying Your Brand
    • 94. Getting Recommendations
    • 95. Video • Create a personal YouTube Channel • Create videos that provide insight into your area of expertise (e.x. 10 Frequently asked questions about your industry or interviews with successful leaders in your field) • Subscribe to YouTube channels of other industry experts • Create a playlist of about topics of expertise • Comment on the channels of industry leaders and others that create exceptional content
    • 96. Twitter • Follow industry leaders and enthusiast • Reply and Retweet content related to your industry • Provide useful information for your Twitter followers • Ask questions of your Twitter follower
    • 97. Twitter Account Customization
    • 98. Twitter Account Customization
    • 99. Blog • Be a though leader. Write blog articles and videos about topics of interest related to your industry • Customize blog with high resolution graphics that communicate your personal brand • Ensure blog has links to all social media sites and contact information • Read, comment, and tweet about other blogs related to your industry.
    • 100. Blog Customization
    • 101. Contributing to the Blogs of Others
    • 102. Final Thought • Be authentic with your brand but don’t get carried away. • At the end of the day we are simply human being seeking to find meaning and make a contribution. • Never let “your brand” stand in the way finding meaning or making a contribution
    • 103. Summary • • • • • What is Branding What is a personal brand 4 Step Personal Branding Process Using social media in personal branding Don’t over do it
    • 104. Questions Michael Tucker Phone: 1-520-309-5295 info@SocialMobileBuzz.com SocialMobileBuzz.com
    • 105. Office of Congressman Ron Barber: “Supporting Small Businesses in Southern Arizona”
    • 106. Sean Collins, Mark Beres, Ray Montoya
    • 107. Ellen Kirton Director, MAC Small Business Development Center Why the SBDC & CLOSING REMARKS
    • 108. What does the SBDC do? Supports Small Business Veterans are a Focus!
    • 109. Your Business Resource • Expert counseling • No cost • Your own business advisor
    • 110. The Team Makes a Difference • 60 years combined banking experience • 80 years combined business experience • Experts in many fields: – Access to capital – Profitability – Business planning and execution – Specialty areas such as assisting veterans!
    • 111. Our Counselors • Ellen Kirton, Director • Karen Burns, Business Analyst • Rick Loveland, Business Analyst Bottom line: “We’re here for you!”
    • 112. We Help Drive Economic Impact! • • • • • • 2012 2013 2012 2013 2012 2013 $6M to 30 companies in loans & equity On target to meet or exceed $6M Helped create over 100 jobs On target to do the same Helped 30 companies get started On target to meet or exceed
    • 113. How We’re Funded • SBA Grant • For 25 years, we have received an SBA Annual Grant • This event is funded through a special veterans grant • Matched funding through our Host MAC Includes funds from the City of Tucson, banks, foundations and organizations that support small business economic development
    • 114. We Love Success! • We each see 70+ companies a year • We each handle on average 30 businesses at a time, working with them towards success • Results really represent the successes of our clients! We’re proud to be a part of that….. Let me share just one……………………
    • 115. Acronyms! • MAC – Microbusiness Advancement Center • WBC – Women’s Business Center • SBDC – Small Business Development Center All under one roof to help you!
    • 116. Contact Us! 330 N Commerce Park Loop #160 520-620-1241 www.mac-sa.org
    • 117. WELCOME!
    • 118. WELCOME!