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Presentation skills - Zen presentation
 

Presentation skills - Zen presentation

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This is a presentaion on how a successful presentation in Power Point should be created. The key essence is KISS (keep it short and simple) - Zen presentaiton.

This is a presentaion on how a successful presentation in Power Point should be created. The key essence is KISS (keep it short and simple) - Zen presentaiton.

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  • material was good send me this copy to my mail tasneem.firdose999@gmail,com
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  • On slide 37,40 and 49 the photo is covering the text. Slide 46 and 47 are the same. (I am not trying to put you down. I am just trying to show you the mistakes so you can fix them.) :) This presentation will help a lot thanks. :(
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    Presentation skills - Zen presentation Presentation skills - Zen presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Presentation Skills
    • Presentation Skills Outline P lanning P reparation P ractice P erformance Q uestions
    • Planning
      • Who are you talking to?
      • Why are you talking to them?
      • How long have you got?
      • What story are you going to tell?
    • Preparation
      • Outline and sketch slides
      • Prepare slides
      • Proof read
      • Prepare notes -
      • brief keywords and phrases, except maybe first couple of paragraphs
    • Preparation - Outline
      • 1 - 2 minutes per slide
      • Generic 15 min Conference Presentation
      • Title Slide (1) Title, author, affiliation, acknowledgements
      • Rationale (1-2) Why this is interesting
      • Methods (1-2) What you did
      • Results (2-4) What did you find and what does it mean
      • Summary (1) One thing you want them to remember
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Relevant images communicate, and maintain interest
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Minimise text & numbers
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Minimise text & numbers Light text on dark background
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Minimise text & numbers Light text on dark background Avoid distracting backgrounds
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Minimise text & numbers Light text on dark background Avoid distracting backgrounds Use large font Arial, Times New Roman or Verdana fonts. 24 pt is minimum , 32 pt, or even 36 pt is better
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Minimise text & numbers Light text on dark background Avoid distracting backgrounds Use large sans serif fonts Mix upper and lower case ALL CAPITALS IS HARDER TO READ, ALTHOUGH IT MIGHT BE OK FOR THE ODD TITLE
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Minimise text & numbers Light text on dark background Avoid distracting backgrounds Use large sans serif fonts Mix upper and lower case Use colour to highlight text Use high contrast colours for important lines, symbols or text , and lower contrast colours for less important lines, symbols or text. But use a small number of colours
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Minimise text & numbers Light text on dark background Avoid distracting backgrounds Use large sans serif fonts Mixture upper and lower case Use colour to highlight text Keep figures simple
    • Show means, sd, effect size statistics, but not test statistics
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Minimise text & numbers Light text on dark background Avoid distracting backgrounds Use large sans serif fonts Mixture upper and lower case Use colour to highlight text Keep figures simple Thick lines and large symbols
    •  
    • Preparation - Slides Use Images & Graphics Minimise text & numbers Light text on dark background Avoid distracting backgrounds Use large sans serif fonts Mixture upper and lower case Use colour to highlight text Keep figures simple Thick lines and large symbols Progressive disclosure
      • Big
      • Simple
      • Clear
      Design Concepts
      • Should be able to read everything from the back row
      • At least 28 pt, preferably 36
      Big
      • No more than 6 lines
      • No more than 7 words per line
      Simple
      • Arial or Helvetica
      • Blue background with yellow text (black/white as well)
      • Avoid overuse of red, shadows, animation and transitions
      • Beware of busy backgrounds
      Clear
      • Clip art should add to the content
      • Use a different background only to emphasize one slide
      Clear
      • Visual Aids should be on the speaker’s left.
    • Practice
      • Practice, practice, practice
      • Get feedback, and use it.
      • Be ruthless – delete unnecessary information
    • Performance
      • Don’t Apologise
      • Speak loudly & clearly
      • Use short simple sentences
      • Avoid jargon & abbrev.
      • Vary pitch, tone, volume, speed and pauses
    • Performance
      • Avoid distracting mannerisms
      • Relax, be enthusiastic
      • Make eye contact
      • Keep an eye on the time remaining
    • Performance
      • Explain figures, and point to important aspects
      • Give a clear and concise summary, then stop.
      • Don’t go overtime. Ever .
    • Questions
      • Anticipate likely questions and prepare extra slides with the answers
      • Maybe even plant a stooge
    • Questions Paraphrase questions 1. so that other people hear the question
    • Questions Paraphrase questions 1. so that other people hear the question 2. to check you understand the questions
    • Questions Paraphrase questions 1. so that other people hear the question 2. to check you understand the questions 3. to stall while you think about an answer
    • Questions If you don’t know the answer, say so. Offer to find out. Ask the audience.
    • Summary Like most things, the best way to learn is to do Here are some samples:
    • Human Faces
      • Both famous men in these slides are looking in the general direction of the quote. You notice the face first, but your eye naturally moves to the text.
      Samples Slides
      • The slide on the right makes better use of eye gaze. The image is more natural as well since it is not cut but naturally bleeds off the right side.
      Samples Slides
      • The slide on the left is acceptable, but notice how much more natural the slide on the right feels when the face of O-Sensei is orientated inward toward the bulk of the slide and in the general direction of the text.
      Samples Slides
      • This is an image of Judit Kawaguchi (who writes for the Japan Times, among other things) interviewing The Dalai Lama on the Shinkansen in Japan. The quote which appears in the slide is something he said during that actual interview on the train. The first slide shows the context, then the second slide fades in which results in Judit Kawaguchi fading out and being replaced by the text; the right third of the slide (The Dalai Lama) never appears to change.
      Samples Slides
    • Not Only Human Faces
      • The context in this case was the oil spill last year in a presentation on general environmental issues.
      Samples Slides
      • The context in this case was the oil spill last year in a presentation on general environmental issues.
      Samples Slides
      • The bird gets your attention and its orientation, shape, and impression of movement upward lead your eye toward the text. The image of the bird almost acts as a big arrow saying "look here."
      Samples Slides
    • Visual Makeover
      • BEFORE: Above (left) is the original slide. The problem with the slide on the left is that the clip-art used does not reinforce the statistic, nor does it even fit the theme of women in the Japanese labor market. The background is a tired, overused PowerPoint template. The text is difficult to read. Overall: "it's ugly."
      Samples Slides
      • AFTER: All the slides were redesigned to match the theme above. The slide on the left is good. But the one on the right can also be used effectively. Notice that either slide (especially the slide without any text) would be virtually meaningless without the presenter's narration.
      Samples Slides
      • Using a pie chart is also a good way to represent this simple statistic. Here (left) the large text at the top can be easily seen. The text reads more like a headline — a declarative sentence — rather than just a title or category. The slide on the right is another possible way to support the message.
      Samples Slides
      • Using a pie chart is also a good way to represent this simple statistic. Here (left) the large text at the top can be easily seen. The text reads more like a headline — a declarative sentence — rather than just a title or category. The slide on the right is another possible way to support the message.
      Samples Slides
    • Backgrounds, salience, and compatibility
      • Above Left: Background image from this PowerPoint template has too much salience itself and competes with the chart in the foreground. Right: Here the contrast is better between the background and the foreground, but the sand and beach ball are not compatible with the message. The background image (also a PowerPoint template) may be appropriate if the chart was comparing sunburn cases or days spent at resort holidays, etc. Still, you could find a better image elsewhere rather than using a tired template.
      Samples Slides
      • Above Left: Besides the color being inappropriate for this chart, the template has a fixed place for the slide title that is nearly a third down the page which interferes with the legibility of the text. We could reduce the size of the chart and place our title in it's designated place, but that would mean the top third of the slide is taken up by ornamentation. Right: The photo is appropriate perhaps for a presentation on organic farming but is not compatible with mobile phones. There are also some contrast and legibility issues as some of the text is difficult to see.
      Samples Slides
      • Above: A background photo of a cell phone user in Japan or South Korea may work. This photo does not make for great contrast, however. Contrast can be helped by placing a dark transparent box behind the chart, and still further by adding a Gaussian blur to the background image.
      Samples Slides
      • Above: Keep slides simple when displaying charts, graphs, or tables. Either of these may work. A white background can make for good contrast with dark text and other elements (nothing has more contrast than black and white) and works well when your room is relatively bright. In a dark room, however, a white background may be overpowering.
      Samples Slides
    •