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Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project
*Prof. Sayli Wable
...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Keywords: - Water management, Strategies, Water demand, Water supply, ...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Leveraging DMIC and Secondary Growth Corridors
The Delhi-Mumbai Indust...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Available Water sources and its management
For the Delhi Mumbai Indust...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

o Non-Potable
• Supply from all possible sources (Godavari River and a...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Seasonal Storage

Seasonal storage will help to store water in rainy s...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Hypothesis
Research Hypothesis is applied to this study as
H0: There i...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Water Supply by Irrigation Department
80 %
80
60
40

20 %

Water Suppl...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Results and Discussion
Water Levels at Jayakwadi for last 5 years
100%...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Loss of water due to Evaporation

295 mm3

3
280 mm3 286 mm

300
250
2...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

As seen before, the daily demand by MIDC is 100mm3 but it gets water s...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

SWOT Analysis

Strength
-

Adequate rainfall, water level
increased co...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Suggestions for water resource management in DMIC
1. Fulfilling the De...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

fertilizers from 4 MIDCs cause hazardous pollution. The Aurangabad Mun...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

9. Awareness of water saving by Aurangabad Municipal Corporation
Lakhs...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Conclusion
As the current demand is 100mm3 by MIDC, but in actual they...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Special Thanks to
 Dr I.D. Alte, Professor, MGM IOM, Aurangabad.
 Mr...
Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project

Annexure
Analysis of Water Supply and Demand
Calculation:
Present gap ...
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Research Paper on Status-Stress of water management for Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Cooridor Project

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Research Paper on DMIC with special reference to Shendra-Bidkin Industrial Corridor

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Transcript of "Research Paper on Status-Stress of water management for Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Cooridor Project"

  1. 1. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project *Prof. Sayli Wable Assistant Professor, MGM Institute of Management, Aurangabad Email id:- sayali.wable@mgmiom.org Contact: - 8275239480 Abstract This paper addresses recent and future status of water resources that have substantial practical implications for Delhi Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) project particularly for Shendra-Bidkin Area. Procuring additional fresh water supplies is highly problematical. As a result attention has naturally turned to “demand management” in the hopes that increased efficiency of water use will produce sufficient savings to meet future water requirements. The major source for DMIC is the available water through Godavari River. So Moving beyond its traditional role of being using the ground water, the government, through the DMIC, seeks to create trunk infrastructure and offer an enabling water reservoir for this project, which will overcome the lacunas of the environmental factors like water level due to rain. This Document is a study regarding the storage capacity of Water of River, its last 5 year distribution to 3 factors  Irrigation  Drinking  Industry According to which what percentage of water is given to Maharashtra Industry Development Corporation. So, accordingly how much present and future demand and supply of Delhi Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) project is analyzed in this paper. As overall DMIC project has Water Demand of 950 MLD (Mega Litter per Day), whose further bifurcation is as follows Phase I – 260 MLD Phase II – 450 MLD Phase III – 240 MLD The Shendra- Bidkin area is regarded in Phase I. This demand of water will be fulfilled through available river, reservoir and wells. DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 1
  2. 2. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Keywords: - Water management, Strategies, Water demand, Water supply, Storage capacity, Sources of water, Industrial use, Domestic use, Evaporation Introduction What is DMIC Government of India has announced the establishing the Dedicated Freight Corridor between Delhi and Mumbai, covering an overall length of 1483km and passing thru the States of U.P, NCR of Delhi, Haryana, Rajasthan, Gujarat and Maharashtra, with end terminals at Dadri in the National Capital Region of Delhi and Jawaharlal Nehru Port near Mumbai. This Dedicated Freight Corridor offers highspeed connectivity for High Axle Load Wagons (25 Tone) of Double Stacked Container Trains supported by high power locomotives. The Delhi Mumbai leg of the Golden Quadrilateral National Highway also runs almost parallel to the Freight Corridor. Vision of DMIC To create strong economic base with globally competitive environment and state-of-the-art infrastructure to activate local commerce, enhance foreign investments and attain sustainable development. Project Goals Developmental planning for DMIC aims to achieve certain end results with implementation that would ensure realization of envisaged vision for the project and lead to economic development. Accordingly the project goals for DMIC are: Double employment potential in 7 years Triple industrial output in 9 years Quadruple exports from the region in 8-9 years DMIC states contribute 43% of India’s GDP, 50% of agricultural produce of principal crops in the country and 60% of total exports. Approximately 60% of total FDI into the country, between April 2000 and April 2012, has been in these states. Further, they constitute 40% of the country’s factories and workforce. DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 2
  3. 3. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Leveraging DMIC and Secondary Growth Corridors The Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) is a mega infrastructure project, which is expected to cover an overall length of 1,483 km between Delhi and Mumbai. About 17% of its project influence area is in Maharashtra, covering approximately 20% area & 26% population of the state. A band of 150 km on either side of the freight corridor has been identified as the influence region for industrial development. The major districts covered under the corridor will be Mumbai Suburban, Mumbai, Than, Nasik, Pune, Aurangabad, Ahmednagar, Dhule, Nandurbar and Raigad. Shendra-Bidkin DMIC Mega Industrial Park is to come up on 8400 hectares of land i.e. 20756 acres. Maharashtra gets Rs 18,500 crore boost to regain industrial glory. The Dighi port and Shendra (Aurangabad) will emerge as industrial townships complete with world-class infrastructure in Maharashtra. Shendra Industrial Park has the estimates to get completed till 2019. The development in Shendra (Aurangabad) will require Rs 2,790 crore for industrial Development. The Shendra Township will cover 8,340 hectares. Roads, drinking water, power, schools, hospitals, market centers, gardens, sewerage, and storm water drainage will be built. The water need is to be fulfilled of 8 million people. 8 million people Industrial Residential Commercial 50% 30% 20% Objectives 1. To study overall Present and Future gap in demand and supply of water 2. To study the water resource management required for Delhi Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) project with reference to Shendra-Bidkin Area 3. To study the strategy of water supply by MIDC 4. To study last 5 years demand and supply of water DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 3
  4. 4. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Available Water sources and its management For the Delhi Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) project, the available water resources are i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. Fresh ground water Saline ground water Surplus flood water during rain Recycled water from external sources Recycle water from within development Rain water harvesting From above mentioned available sources the water for the DMIC project from Bidkin to Karmad, the major source is Godavari dam and the ground water sources (wells and saline water). There are in all 32 wells with Aurangabad Municipal Corporation. From which more than half wells are dried and rest have inadequate water storage. Many of these wells are used for drinking and irrigation purpose. Principles considered for IWRM Planning Process Decision model analysis to develop a Dynamic Water Operating Module Develop models for evaluating Water Supply Options for Technical and Economic Feasibility. Model elements should include: • Demands from various sources o Potable DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 4
  5. 5. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project o Non-Potable • Supply from all possible sources (Godavari River and associated canals, Groundwater, Reuse, Desalinization, Rain water harvesting) o Allow source prioritization • Capital and Operating Costs for Selected Treatment Approach (AMC has allocated Rs. 34 Crore for Water treatment ) • Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Module • Scenario Manager / Operating model to provide the water through year with “optimized” impact on cost, society and environment. ASR Installation Common ASR Applications • Capture temporal sources for increased reliability / improved water quality • Eliminate evaporative losses in reservoirs • Avoid loss of riverside habitat associated with surface reservoirs • Increase water treatment works / conveyance system / operational efficiency DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 5
  6. 6. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Seasonal Storage Seasonal storage will help to store water in rainy season and recover when water scarcity is observed. The demand will be fulfilled on monthly and annual basis. The demand of water with Shendra-Bidkin DMIC is Monthly Demand = 750 mm3 Annual Demand = 9000 mm3 Research Methodology Data Collection This is an exploratory study which is based on Primary data and Secondary data. Primary Data Interview method was conducted with the following people 1. 2. 3. 4. Irrigation Department, Paithan MIDC, Aurangabad C.A.D.A., Aurangabad WALMI, Aurangabad Secondary Data The sources of Secondary Data are websites, newspaper, journal and books. DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 6
  7. 7. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Hypothesis Research Hypothesis is applied to this study as H0: There is significant difference between demand and supply of water Analysis of Demand and Supply of Water Water Demand Delhi Mumbai Industrial Corridor has demanded 25mm3 of water daily to MIDC. These are their estimates of water on daily basis which they have planned to complete till 2019. As on now, the process of land acquisition is in progress, after which they will start their actual construction. Future water Demand of DMIC (Shendra-Bidkin Area) = 25mm3 (After 2 years till 2019) Demand of Water in the year 2042 = 2% of total Storage of Jayakwadi (58.18 mm3 from 2909 mm3) Supply of Water Water Supply for Aurangabad District With reference to above level at River, the water supply is categorized in 3 parts as 1. Drinking water 2. Industrial use 3. Irrigation So, the water for irrigation is only given when the overall percentage of water supply is above 33%. As seen in the report, for the year 2011-12 irrigation water was no supplied due to water level 9.33%. Similar is the case for the 2013 as the available water level is 25%(as mentioned on the date 26 th September,2013). In such conditions the water is only supplied for the drinking and industrial use. The Irrigation department supplies the fixed quantity of water as mentioned below Population-36.95 lakhs as per 2011 census Current expenditure of AMC for lifting the water from Jayakwadi reservoir is Rs. 34 Cr. DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 7
  8. 8. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Water Supply by Irrigation Department 80 % 80 60 40 20 % Water Supply 20 0 MIDC Drinking Source: Irrigation Department, Paithan Aurangabad water supply and industrial use is fixed by the Irrigation which is 100mm3 water, so in this supply, MIDC distributes water to industries at Waluj and Other areas. Some of the Surface Water Resources available for Aurangabad District are          Sukhna River Notified Naregaon to Sukhna dam Sukhna Dam Small Irrigation dam Chitepimpalgaon Salim Ali Lake Small Percolation tank Aurangabad at Delhi gate. Harsul Dam Small Percolation tank Aurangabad at Harsul Jaikwadi Dam Large irrigation dam Aurangabad District Tembhapuri Dam Medium irrigation dam Limbejalgaon, Turkabad Tisgaon Lake Small Percolation tank Tisgaon Ranjangaon Lake Small Percolation tank Ranjangaon Kham River (Nonnotified) Non – notified Harsul to Bramhagavhan  Shivna River (Nonnotified) Non – notified Dahegaon & Lasur station DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 8
  9. 9. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Results and Discussion Water Levels at Jayakwadi for last 5 years 100% 80% 60% 40% Actual level 58.75 % 100 % 20% Water Deficient 62.8 % 24.35 % 9.33 % 26 % 0% 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Source: Irrigation Department, Paithan Maximum capacity of the river is 2,909 mm3 of water, as the graph shows in 2008 the water level was 100% which is only depended on rain water (fresh water). In which 30% of 2909mm3(872.7mm3) is a dead stock, which means it is not fresh water from rain at that year. In the year 2012, as the water level was 9.33% (i.e. 271.4mm3), it resulted in water scarcity, so there was not supply of water for such projects. At this situation, 22.89mm3 water was given to MIDC. Due to which the dead stock of the river was used which was approximately 150-200 mm3. But as per sources till 26th September, 2013 the water in the river was 25%, so this year, the dead stock will not be required for using for drinking and industrial purpose. According to the Irrigation Department, dated on 25th September, 2013, out of 2909mm3 water storage capacity, currently Jayakwadi is having 1323.492 mm 3 of storage, from which 585.386 mm3 is usable water. Evaporation As seen previously, the water level of Godavari is reduced due to Evaporation. The MIDC have suggested supplying water to DMIC project from Jayakwadi as there is reduced water in summer season, so maximum water can be supplied in rainy season. For fulfilling the demand supply gap, Nandurmadhmeshwar canal supplied 22.458 mm3 of water, out of which 6.383 mm3 actually reached. Due to which 2% increase in the current water level was observed. Last year 10 mm3 of water was supplied, out of which 6.11 mm3 was actually received. This situation enforced to use 143 mm3 of dead stock, which resulted decrease of 1.10 mm3 of water in dead stock. In July 2013, there was a hope of increasing water level due to heavy rainfall, but it went in vain. DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 9
  10. 10. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Loss of water due to Evaporation 295 mm3 3 280 mm3 286 mm 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 213 242 mm3 mm3 Evaporation 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 Source: Irrigation Department, Paithan The above graph shows how much water is evaporated from the total storage of water in last 5 years. When the water level was 9.33% of total storage capacity, the evaporation was 242mm 3. This resulted in water scarcity and Aurangabad district had to bear water cutoff for industries and the related projects. In such circumstances, State Government declared the available water for only drinking use for Aurangabad district. As estimated by Irrigation Department, the average evaporation every year is 300mm3. Strategy of Supplying Water by MIDC MIDC have build up a separate Water Treatment Plant for Industries and DMIC. As Jayakwadi is major water source, it supplies daily 50 to 52 mm3 water to MIDC, which first undergoes through Water Treatment Plant located at Bramhagavan, Bidkin. After filtering, the water is distributed in following manner. Daily Water Supply of MIDC 5 mm3 Waluj MIDC & Residential 5 mm3 Shendra 10 mm3 32 mm3 Chikalthana Jalna MIDC Source: MIDC, Aurangabad DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 10
  11. 11. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project As seen before, the daily demand by MIDC is 100mm3 but it gets water supply of 52mm3. Dependency and Demand of Water Factors Demand of Water Drinking Water Terminal Power Plant Irrigation Evaporation Usable water other than dead stock Gap between future Demand and Supply of usable water 140.75mm3 102.00mm3 288mm3 382.80mm3 421.82mm3 491.73mm3 Water coming from upper dam to Jayakwadi (considering 756.50mm3 35% loss) (These estimates are from 16th September, 2013 to 31st July, 2014) Water and sewerage generated and Demand Water & Sewerage Generation & demand (Mld) Year 2022 94 2032 211 2042 335 Sewage generated 69 156 252 Water demand met by recycled water Fresh Water Demand Source: - www.walmi.com 64 146 231 30 65 104 Total Water Demand Challenges in DMIC Region needs “out of box” solutions • Over exploited ground water in the region- deep GWT and saline ground water. • Salt disposal challenges • Average rainfall is not more than 400 / 500 mm • Impact of climate variability • Competitive water needs / demand in the region and changing priority. DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 11
  12. 12. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project SWOT Analysis Strength - Adequate rainfall, water level increased compared to last year Resources & part of Godavari river Opportunities - Development of water retaining structures & storage capacities Promotion of recycling of water AMC funding for water resource DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Weakness - Demand-supply mismatch - Changes in climatic conditions Threats -Adoptability of recycling water - Excess use of will lead to water logging and reduction in productivity of land Page 12
  13. 13. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Suggestions for water resource management in DMIC 1. Fulfilling the Demand This water requirement can not be fulfilled only by the Jayakwadi dam; it will require coordination with other districts. As the dams’ located nearby are totally filled as on date 27th September, 2013. The Irrigation Department and MIDC should take appropriate decisions based on future estimates. 2. Socio—Political Scenario Proper coordination cannot be established due to Political environment, the political leaders of other districts refuse to supply water for Marathwada. According to Irrigation Department, dated on 27th September, 2013, only 26% of water is stored as compared to other dams which are stored 100% due to rainfall. Some of them are as follows Dams Storage Percentage filled till 27/09/2013 Gangapur 5565 100% Kashyapi 1726 100% Gautamigodavari 1831 100% Palkhed 750 100% Waghad 2503 100% Punegaon 609 100% Darna 7149 100% Bhavli 1434 100% Valdevi 1133 100% Alandi 970 100% Bhojapur 358 100% Chankapur 2708 100% Haranbari 1166 100% Kelzar 572 100% As the data shows, the availability of water in other districts, but the Shendra-Bidkin have to face the water scarcity, that to fulfilling the demand of 25mm3 for overall development including the Industrial Parks. 3. Solid waste should be dumped properly. Total quantity of 13.42 MLD effluents is produced by MIDC industries resulting in water pollution. Proper measures should be taken by MIDC and DMIC to get control on these effluents. The major source of carcinogens, probable carcinogens and other toxins are bulk drugs and electroplating industries. Of the 107 MLD of domestic waste generated by Aurangabad Municipal Corporation, only 6.5 MLD of sewage is treated and the remainder is disposed without treatment into adjacent water bodies. Agricultural runoff, leach ate from MSW dump, illegal dump site etc. should be controlled. Pesticides and DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 13
  14. 14. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project fertilizers from 4 MIDCs cause hazardous pollution. The Aurangabad Municipal Corporation should have a scientific, secured solid waste dump. 4. Ground water contamination For the ground water quality in MIDC Waluj as per the study conducted by NEERI says there are 32 wells. Actions should be taken by MIDC, Industries, and Irrigation Department to preserve these wells. 5. Proper control on scarcity of water When water scarcity is analyzed from future estimates, adequate amount of water should be supplied with proper coordination to avoid the evaporation faced in other seasons. 6. Fulfilling the water Demand of DMIC The estimated per day demand of 25 mm3 of water should plan prior, so that even in water scarcity, there will be adequate supply of water by MIDC. Accordingly plan should be made to fulfill this daily demand. 7. Public awareness and training for water saving Creating public Awareness for reducing wastage of water & conducting effective training for water saving. 8. Output Expectation of DMIC When provided adequate amount of water, overall DMIC project in Maharashtra is expecting 46,409,571 INR MN Output in 2040. Waste of water from Nahar E Palshi Source: - Sakal Newspaper (dated on 3rd October, 2013) DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 14
  15. 15. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project 9. Awareness of water saving by Aurangabad Municipal Corporation Lakhs of liter of water is wasted of Nahar E Palshi due to avoidance of AMC. Lack of proper Water Management is leading to water scarcity which is suffered by Population and also by projects such as DMIC. Proper water harvesting is necessary for fresh water. Due to which people are encroaching and using the water for construction. If AMC tries to use this water properly, the issue of drinking water can be controlled to a large extent. DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 15
  16. 16. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Conclusion As the current demand is 100mm3 by MIDC, but in actual they get 52mm3 of water from Irrigation for industrial use. So, there is gap of 48mm3 of water. The estimates by DMIC of 25mm3 of water are required after 2 years, because currently the land acquisition of total 8400 hectares for Shendra-Bidkin area. Proper treatment on dead stock can overcome the water scarcity for DMIC. There is much that can be done to improve the productivity of water on technical grounds. The institutional, social and economic aspects of these improvements need to be carefully investigated to determine the feasibility of the DMIC project. But, given the fact that existing demand of water like drinking, irrigation and other water-using systems are not nearly as inefficient as they are commonly thought to be at the level of estimated efficiency, there will remain a need for further water development projects. This will require better conjunctive use of surface and subsurface water supplies, water conservation techniques, small and large dams. Here is one of the examples of Bramhagavan Water Treatment Project, which will help in condition of water scarcity to refine and use the dead stock for DMIC and people will not be affected for scarcity of drinking water (fresh water). In the new era of water management, we should be able to fulfill the water demand so such projects, so that they will indirectly yield in successful implementation. From this overall study, Shendra-Bidkin DMIC have to face water scarcity for its development, because the present and future gap between water demand and supply is high, which have to first prioritize drinking water and then industrial water. DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 16
  17. 17. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Special Thanks to  Dr I.D. Alte, Professor, MGM IOM, Aurangabad.  Mr. Vyawahare, Irrigation Engineer, Aurangabad  Mr. Abasaheb Deshmukh, MIDC, Aurangabad  Mr. Choudhary, MIDC, Aurangabad  Mr. Kakade, Senior Engineer, WALMI, Auranagabd Bibliography  Department of MIDC, Aurangabad.  Department of Irrigation, Paithan.  ISAS_Special Report No_14  Industrial Policy of Maharashtra 2013  http://aurangabad.nic.in  Maharashtra Jeevan Pradhikaran, Aurangabad  AMC Water Annual Report, 2013.  www.dmic.gov.in  www.walmi.gov.in  Newspaper (Sakal dated on 3rd October,2013) DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 17
  18. 18. Status-Stress of water management for DMIC project Annexure Analysis of Water Supply and Demand Calculation: Present gap between demand and supply of water Demand = 100mm3 Supply = 52mm3 100 - 52= 48mm3 The gap of 48mm3 water has occurred mainly due to less rainfall, inadequate storage capacity and improper water harvesting. The water scarcity can be solved by proper coordination. Water loss due to evaporation can be reduced by supplying from other dam to Jayakwadi during rainy season. Current Demand for DMIC = 25mm3 As the present supply of water for MIDC is 52mm3 from which DMIC alone needs 25mm3. So, the dam is having total of 2909mm3 of water from which 0.55% will be requirement of Shendra-Bidkin DMIC Project. Future Demand (2042) for DMIC = 58.18 mm3 This shows that for DMIC Project, MIDC have to increase its demand as per future requirement. The Overall requirement from dam will increase from) 0.55% to 2% of water. DMIC MGM IOM©Prof. Sayli Wable Page 18

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