New Media & Social Identity Theory

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New Media & Social Identity Theory

  1. 1. Vs.
  2. 2. INTRODUCING SOCIAL IDENTITY THEORY Re-defining our ‘social’ self!
  3. 3. WHAT WHY WHERE WHEN SOCIAL IDENTITY THEORY
  4. 4. What is SOCIALIDENTITY THEORY? • Social Identity Theory explains how prejudice can result from intergroup relations that involve identification with the in-group and negative attitudes towards the out-group • Mechanism – – Identity is derived primarily from group memberships – People strive to achieve or maintain a positive social identity. – This positive identity derives largely from favorable comparisons that can be made between the in-group and relevant out-groups
  5. 5. What is SOCIALIDENTITY THEORY? • History - Social Identity Theory was developed by Tajfel and Turner in 1979. – The theory was originally developed to understand the psychological basis of intergroup discrimination. • Tajfel attempted to identify minimal conditions that would lead members of one group to discriminate in favor of the in-group to which they belonged and against another out-group.
  6. 6. • In the event of an unsatisfactory identity people may seek to leave their group or find ways of achieving more positive distinctiveness for it. • Key Assumptions – – People must be subjectively identified with their in-group; – The situation should permit evaluative intergroup comparisons – The out-group must be sufficiently comparable (e.g. similar or proximal) and that pressures for distinctiveness should increase with comparability What is SOCIALIDENTITY THEORY?
  7. 7. • Key problems solved - Conflicting roles of ‘identity’ in research – Personal identity which refers to self-knowledge that derives from the individual’s unique attributes • I like Lady Gaga, I am a wacky person, I am prone to major episodes of dress-to-impress! – Individual-based perception of what defines the “us” associated with any internalized group membership. • I am a Singaporean, I am female, I am Christian • Defines the ‘social’ self based on group, in-group bias, status inequality, stereotyping, etc WhY is IT IMPORTANT?
  8. 8. • Media ownership & content are important elements of intergroup environment – American media propagates the dominant class’s hegemonic ideology in order to gain the consent of the subordinate classes to a system that perpetuates their subordination – Advertising depicts American Indians in stereotypical ways • Individuals’ group identification levels influence their relationship with media – Social creativity demonstrates that individuals prefer shows featuring in-group members, even when the content is controlled – Women read romance novel to support their gender identities, despite what might be construed as demeaning portrayals of women in books. WhERE IS IT APPLICABLE?
  9. 9. • Media content influences intergroup cognitions – Identification: Nationalistic appeals in advertising can protect the collective self-esteem of individuals who identify strongly with their nation – US coverage of Gulf War in ways that encouraged support for the war and discourage dissent – In ROCKY IV, Rocky loses to a Russian boxer and this resulted in high level of derogation of Russians as a group • Group process driven by identification influences media environment – Dominant groups use this strategy when their identity is threatened – As women power in society grows, violent pornography proliferates as a response to feminism WhERE IS IT APPLICABLE?
  10. 10. • Tajfel and Turner (1979) identify three variables whose contribution to the emergence of in-group favoritism is particularly important. – Self-identification with group constructs self-concept – Prevailing context fuels group comparison – Perceived relevance of the comparison group (shaped by the relative and absolute status of the in-group) • Individuals are likely to display favoritism when an in-group is central to their self-definition and a given comparison is meaningful or the outcome is contestable. WHENIS IT APPLICABLE?
  11. 11. AS FATE HAD IT! OR WAS IT NO INTERNET!
  12. 12. INTERMISSION
  13. 13. Breaking Boundaries of Social Identity: The Rise of Heroes and …
  14. 14. ….Brands!
  15. 15. VIA SIT: WORSHIPPING IMAGINATION Media Defined Groups Traits/Utopia based Social Identification No space/time constraints Fan fiction, symbols, language fuel group identity
  16. 16. My Brand GroupMy Recognition VIA SIT :UNDERSTANDINGONLINE BRAND RELATIONSHIPS
  17. 17. VIA SIT :UNDERSTANDINGONLINE BRAND RELATIONSHIPS PROSUMERS (ELITE) LOYALS PROSUMERS (COMMON) CONSUMERS SKILL INVOLVED IN SOCIAL IDENTITY BRAND’SRECOGNITIONINGROUP HIGH LOW LOWHIGH OUT GROUP INVASION
  18. 18. PROSUMERS (ELITE) DIVERGE – LESS RESIST – LESS LOYALS DIVERGE – LESS RESIST - MORE PROSUMERS (COMMON) DIVERGE – MORE RESIST - MORE CONSUMERS DIVERGE – LESS RESIST - LESS SKILL INVOLVED IN SOCIAL IDENTITY BRAND’SRECOGNITIONINGROUP HIGH LOW LOWHIGH VIA SIT :UNDERSTANDINGONLINE BRAND RELATIONSHIPS
  19. 19. VIA SIT :UNDERSTANDINGknowledge gaps Vs. SAME KNOWLEDGE - COPY RIGHTS DIFFERENT APPROACHES FOR SEEKING IT BASED ON SOCIAL IDENTITY – FREEDOM Vs. HEGEMONY SELF CONCEPT (In-group vs. Out-group) BASED KNOWLEDGE GAPS!
  20. 20. GROUP WAR AS STRUGGLE FOR POWER STILL EXIST REVOLUTIONARY WAR - 1775
  21. 21. JUST THAT … IT’S FOUGHT ONLINE NOW!! WIKIPEDIAN ACTIVITY - 2010
  22. 22. THEN IT WAS SIZE (DEMOGRAPHICS), SWORDS & PROXIMITY… GULLIVER TRAVELS - 1894
  23. 23. NOW IT’S ABOUT BELIEFS (HEROES/BRANDS), WORDS & ANONYMITY! STREET FIGHTER 4 - 2010

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