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SXSW Workshop on Designing for Behavior Change (2014)
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SXSW Workshop on Designing for Behavior Change (2014)

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Slides from my 2.5 hour SXSW workshop on how to design products to support behavior change among users. The toolkit that accompanies it is up on actiondesign.hellowallet.com.

Slides from my 2.5 hour SXSW workshop on how to design products to support behavior change among users. The toolkit that accompanies it is up on actiondesign.hellowallet.com.

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  • Goal: Build Credibility
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  • Interactive – so, let’s say you have an app. What might cue the person? ..
  • …So how do you improve each area, or help users overcome obstacles if there are any? …Get in peoples’ line of sight.Become part of the environment. Become part of routines. Hook into stuff people already attend to.Avoid crowded places (like email).
  • Get in peoples’ line of sight.Become part of the environment. Become part of routines. Hook into stuff people already attend to.Avoid crowded places (like email).
  • Don’t be ugly.Tailor to their prior experiences.Build on related, positive experiences.Remember, users learn: the action has to actually be pleasant.
  • Don’t be ugly.Tailor to their prior experiences.Build on related, positive experiences.Remember, users learn: the action has to actually be pleasant.
  • Make the value prop clear
  • Does the user know what to do?Can the user do it?Does the user believe it?Show them how. Make them confident.Or, cheat.
  • Why do I use this example? Its because from a behavioral perspective, we often jump too quickly from “I have a problem” to “I have a solution”. We immediately think about the action that’s obvious for users to take, but it might be ineffective in practice. So this section gives a structured approach you can take a WAIT and force yourself and your team to check your assumptions. This builds on approaches that are already used in the field – I’ll point out the aspects that are particularly unique and useful from a behavioral perspective. So, we’re looking for three things: what affect the product has on the world, who’s doing the action, and what it is they do. Or, the Outcome, Actor, and Action.
  • Dessonance.wordpress.com
  • Dessonance.wordpress.com
  • Dessonance.wordpress.com
  • Break the action up into small, manageable stepsBuild up the users’ confidence Give clear feedbackMake it clear what to do physically, specificallyLook for ways to cheat, and look for habit loops.Question: What sequence of actions will help users exercise?
  • Motivate – why should they act?Trigger – actually ASK them to act. Identify and neutralize competing motivations & triggers Question: What’s in the users’ environment, for each step? Write out the story: why act, why now, and why not do something else?
  • Educate? Only if necessary. Usually wastedHook into prior positive associations & experiencesDevelop a self-narrative that the user will succeed Question: How do you prepare the user to act, for each step of the progression?

SXSW Workshop on Designing for Behavior Change (2014) SXSW Workshop on Designing for Behavior Change (2014) Presentation Transcript

  • Design for Behavior Change SXSW Workshop 9 March 2014 Stephen Wendel @sawendel #D4BC
  • Why are we here?
  • Why are we here?
  • Introductions Understand how users decide what to do next Discover the right action to target Design around that action Refine over time – become Less Wrong {3 exercises; Pit stops as needed; Q&A any time you like} Topics 1 2 3 4 5
  • It’s tim to manage your (lack of) money!
  • Not so scary after all… Best in Class User Experience Behavioral Science Driven Software Backed by Consumer Finance Expertise Community Partnerships B2B SaaS Company 1 2 3 4 5
  • My job… 1 2 3 4 5
  • Translate the research… oreilly.com/go/behavior-change Benefits & Behavior Change 1 2 3 4 5
  • And apply it to our products 1 2 3 4 5
  • And you? Daily work? Impact? Donuts? 1 2 3 4 5
  • Everything important 1 2 3 4 5
  • Summary – Part 1 Providing Value Isn’t Enough. Find the particular behavioral obstacles users face, and solve them. Delivering more value to users (i.e. a stronger motivation to act) usually isn’t the answer. 1 2 3 4 5
  • Summary – Part 2 Be Less Wrong. Human behavior is too complex to fully fathom. Any intervention we try will be partially wrong, and will sometimes make things worse. With testing & iteration we can become Less Wrong. 1 2 3 4 5
  • There ain’t no magic wand. But there is a method (Look familiar?) Summary – Part 3 1 2 3 4 5
  • Next Up – The decision-making process Introductions Understand how users decide what to do next Discover the right action to target Design around that action Refine over time – become Less Wrong 1 2 3 4 5
  • Steve, you’ve got some work to do Motivation (i.e., value) isn’t enough. 1 2 3 4 5
  • To What’s required for people to take action? From To Every person & every action is unique. But the mind goes through a similar process. 1 2 3 4 5
  • 5 Steps to Action 1 2 3 4 5
  • Got an app to help people exercise? 1 2 3 4 5
  • Step 1: Detect A Cue 1 2 3 4 5
  • Step 1: Detect A Cue 1 2 3 4 5
  • Step 2: Evoke a Positive Reaction 1 2 3 4 5
  • Step 2: Evoke a Positive Reaction 1 2 3 4 5
  • Step 3: Pass the Conscious Evaluation 1 2 3 4 5
  • Step 4: Make Sure They’re Able to Act 1 2 3 4 5
  • Step 5: Make it Urgent 1 2 3 4 5
  • Step 5: Make it Urgent 1 2 3 4 5
  • 3 strategies to pass the funnel 1 2 3 4 5
  • Exercise! 1 2 3 4 5 {Page 9: Using the CREATE Action Funnel} {Pick a volunteer & do the exercise as a group}
  • Next Up – Pick the right action Introductions Understand how users decide what to do next Discover the right action to target Design around that action Refine over time – become Less Wrong 1 2 3 4 5
  • What’s the best way to lose weight? 1 2 3 4 5
  • What’s the best way to lose weight? 1 2 3 4 5
  • Discover the Outcome, Actor & Action 1 2 3 4 5
  • Define the target outcome Impact. What will be different about the world, when your product is completely successful? 1 2 3 4 5
  • Make it tangible Why do you really care? Why would your users really care? 1 2 3 4 5
  • Make sure you can measure it “Users will gain experience with exercise” vs “Americans will have an average BMI of 25” 1 2 3 4 5
  • Generate ideas for actions Make stuff up! 5-10 different actions to cause the outcome. 1 2 3 4 5
  • Do your (user) research Where are they starting from? What’s normal for them? 1 2 3 4 5
  • Evaluate the actions Build a Matrix. For each Action: Impact, Ease, Cost, Fit 1 2 3 4 5
  • Elicit additional constraints Channel? Timeframe? “Tone” of App? Constraints make us free 1 2 3 4 5
  • Exercise! {Page 11: Group exercise} {Pick a behavioral problem} {Discover the right action to target} 1 2 3 4 5
  • Next Up – Designing around that action 1 2 3 4 Introductions Understand how users decide what to do next Discover the right action to target Design around that action Refine over time – become Less Wrong 1 2 3 4 5
  • What do you need to write a book? 1 2 3 4 5
  • Design the Action, Environment & User 1 2 3 4 5
  • Our goal: develop a story How will users progress from starting out to success? Customer experience map by Mel Edwards, desonance.wordpress.com 1 2 3 4 5
  • Structure the Action: Break down hard problems Take the garden path. Make each step is pleasant. Straightforward. “Easy”. Tailor it to their prior experiences. Skip ahead where possible. 1 2 3 4 5
  • Construct the environment to support action Grab the user’s attention. Make sure the motivation is clear. Provide urgency. Remove distractions. 1 2 3 4 5
  • Prepare the user Help users see and tell the story of their successes. Build on related, positive experiences. Educate users about how to do take action. 1 2 3 4 5
  • Techniques 1 2 3 4 Obstacle: Try This: Cue Tell the Employees What the Action Is Make It Clear Where to Act Clear the Page of Distractions Reaction Make Site Beautiful and Professional Deploy Social Proof Display Strong Authority on the Subject Be Authentic and Personal Evaluation Prime Employee-Relevant Associations Leverage Loss Aversion Use Peer Comparisons Run a Competition Avoid Cognitive Overhead Avoid Choice Overload Avoid Direct Payments Ability Elicit Implementation Intentions Default Everything Lessen Burden of Action and Information Deploy (Positive) Peer Comparisons Timing Frame text to avoid temporal myopia Remind of prior commitment to act Make it scarce
  • In other words, it’s where to use these: 1 2 3 4 5
  • Another exercise graphic! {Page 13: Pick a volunteer} {Design the behavioral plan} 1 2 3 4 5
  • Next Up – Refining over time Introductions Understand how users decide what to do next Discover the right action to target Design around that action Refine over time – become Less Wrong 1 2 3 4 5
  • A minor question… When is the best day of week & time of day to contact folks? 10:30am Monday 10:30am Tuesday 8:00pm Tuesday 1 2 3 4 5
  • With a massive effect 3.7% clicked 7.1% clicked 1.6% clicked When is the best day of week & time of day to contact folks? 10:30am Monday 10:30am Tuesday 8:00pm Tuesday 1 2 3 4 5
  • You’ll often get it wrong. Confidence is an illusion. 1 2 3 4 5
  • Refine via impact, new ideas & re-measurement 1 2 3 4 5
  • Assess where you are now Controlled Experiments: The Gold Standard Statistical Models w. Controls: Harder Work, For a Silver Medal 1 2 3 4 5
  • Build a data bridge if needed 1 2 3 4 5
  • Generate ideas for what’s going wrong 1 2 3 4 5
  • Change it, Measure it How much Rigor you need depends on: • How big of an impact you’re looking for. • How much else is going on at the same time. • Whether the action is unique to the app. So, develop multiple “testing” platforms. 1 2 3 4 5
  • Next Up – Recap Introductions Understand how users decide what to do next Discover the right action to target Design around that action Refine over time – become Less Wrong 1 2 3 4 5
  • It doesn’t matter how awesome your product is…
  • Remember this!
  • Remember this!
  • Remember this!
  • Remember this!
  • Comments? Personal Stories? @sawendel www.about.me/sawendel
  • Thank You!
  • OPTIONAL MATERIAL
  • Many types of decision making
  • Many different strategies to change them
  • So what’s a habit? Adapted from ABC Model (eg Miltenberger 2011) and Duhigg 2012