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Watershed restoration as a mitigation outcome  Neil Stichert Juneau Fish and Wildlife Field Office Perspectives from a pra...
Presentation Goal and Objectives <ul><li>Goal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer perspectives on applications and challenges of h...
Principle:  Definitions are important <ul><li>Rehabilitation : Replacing or restructuring a degraded ecosystem or habitat ...
Principle:  Definitions are important
<ul><li>Inventory   (where are the problems?)  </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment  (what is the condition?)  </li></ul><ul><li>P...
: Principle:   Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory Therefore…there are re...
Principle:   Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory
Principle:   Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory <ul><li>Sample elements ...
Principle:   Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory <ul><li>Sample elements ...
Principle:   Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory <ul><li>When basic eleme...
Principle:  Assessment information is lacking in Southeast Alaska   (especially on non-federal lands)   Wetlands Fish Habi...
Principle:  Assessment information is lacking in Southeast Alaska   (but it’s getting better)   <ul><li>Anadromous Waters ...
Principle:   Compliance versus Opportunity is a case-by-case determination <ul><li>Principle applies to: </li></ul><ul><li...
BEFORE AFTER Principle:   Restoration projects generally take more time the regulatory climate allows 2000 2009
Principle:   Restoration projects cost a lot more than you think  (not including project management costs) Stream simulati...
<ul><li>The pattern in which each permit authority requires their jurisdictional and/or interest area to be represented in...
<ul><li>The pattern by which a permit authority drives the design through specification of  generic criteria which may or ...
<ul><li>Development and regulatory community need to build in inherent  lead time  for the identification, planning, desig...
<ul><li>Development community will have to invest in more expertise to ensure that specific designs accomplish the habitat...
<ul><li>Restoration as a mitigation outcome might be most successful on properties already or concurrently protected. </li...
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Watershed Restoration by Neil Stichert

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Watershed restoration as a mitigation outcome

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Transcript of "Watershed Restoration by Neil Stichert "

  1. 1. Watershed restoration as a mitigation outcome Neil Stichert Juneau Fish and Wildlife Field Office Perspectives from a practitioner
  2. 2. Presentation Goal and Objectives <ul><li>Goal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer perspectives on applications and challenges of habitat creation, restoration, and/or enhancement for mitigation. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Objectives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer some principles and common pitfalls of restoration planning. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Suggest pathways for moving forward. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Principle: Definitions are important <ul><li>Rehabilitation : Replacing or restructuring a degraded ecosystem or habitat type with another productive type </li></ul><ul><li>Partial Restoration (Enhancement): Restoring some ecosystem function and some of the original, dominant species. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Restoration : Restoring full ecological and physical function as well as the original species abundance and community composition. </li></ul><ul><li>Habitat Protection: The practice of acquiring real property or protecting habitat through legal instruments for the purpose of maintaining biodiversity. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Principle: Definitions are important
  5. 5. <ul><li>Inventory (where are the problems?) </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment (what is the condition?) </li></ul><ul><li>Prioritization (which should we remedy first?) </li></ul><ul><li>Planning (all successful projects have a plan) </li></ul><ul><li>Survey and Design (sites are specific, and design requires input) </li></ul><ul><li>Permitting (structured exchange of information) </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation (construction skill and detail are important) </li></ul><ul><li>Inspection (is it being built per the plan?) </li></ul><ul><li>Project evaluation (did we achieve the desired outcome?) </li></ul><ul><li>Maintenance / Adaptive Management (it’s hard to get it right </li></ul><ul><li>or conditions change) </li></ul>Principle: Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory
  6. 6. : Principle: Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory Therefore…there are relatively few ‘shovel ready’ projects ready to be implemented
  7. 7. Principle: Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory
  8. 8. Principle: Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory <ul><li>Sample elements of a parking lot plan and design: </li></ul><ul><li>Need </li></ul><ul><li>User type </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Slope </li></ul><ul><li>Conveyance of surface water </li></ul><ul><li>Land and construction cost </li></ul><ul><li>Surface material </li></ul><ul><li>Planting plan </li></ul>
  9. 9. Principle: Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory <ul><li>Sample elements of a stream relocation plan and design: </li></ul><ul><li>Need </li></ul><ul><li>‘ User’ type </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Slope </li></ul><ul><li>Conveyance of surface water </li></ul><ul><li>Land and construction cost </li></ul><ul><li>Surface material </li></ul><ul><li>Planting plan </li></ul>
  10. 10. Principle: Successful Development, Restoration, and Mitigation work follows the same trajectory <ul><li>When basic elements of a stream relocation plan and design are omitted, it often results in: </li></ul><ul><li>Simplification of habitat complexity </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced/different species occupancy </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced species density </li></ul><ul><li>Non-attainment of mitigation objective </li></ul>
  11. 11. Principle: Assessment information is lacking in Southeast Alaska (especially on non-federal lands) Wetlands Fish Habitat Land ownership Culvert locations and barriers
  12. 12. Principle: Assessment information is lacking in Southeast Alaska (but it’s getting better) <ul><li>Anadromous Waters Cataloging- recent updates in JNU, Haines, Sitka, Yakutat </li></ul><ul><li>Fish Passage Assessments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Existing- TNF, DNR, Corporation lands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ongoing- ADOT road system </li></ul></ul><ul><li>TNF Watershed Restoration Plans </li></ul><ul><li>CBJ Wetland Mgmt Plan Revision </li></ul><ul><li>Watershed Council products </li></ul><ul><li>SE GIS Library - data </li></ul><ul><li>Statewide Digital Mapping Initiative (SDMI) -imagery </li></ul>
  13. 13. Principle: Compliance versus Opportunity is a case-by-case determination <ul><li>Principle applies to: </li></ul><ul><li>Past mitigation sites </li></ul><ul><li>Culvert barriers </li></ul><ul><li>Unpermitted fills </li></ul><ul><li>Solid/Toxic waste sites </li></ul><ul><li>Other </li></ul>
  14. 14. BEFORE AFTER Principle: Restoration projects generally take more time the regulatory climate allows 2000 2009
  15. 15. Principle: Restoration projects cost a lot more than you think (not including project management costs) Stream simulation culvert replacement = $60,000-$100,000 (no utility conflicts or pavement) Wetland enhancement = $20,000-$60,000 acre (+ land and/or easement cost) Removal of infrastructure from acquired lands = $ 20,000-$30,000 (+ appraisal and contaminants abatement cost) Invasive Plant Control = Annual $ Cost x Years Viability of Seed Bank
  16. 16. <ul><li>The pattern in which each permit authority requires their jurisdictional and/or interest area to be represented in the design. </li></ul><ul><li>Solution is to define the habitat objectives in writing and work through an interdisciplinary design process to achieve those objectives. Establishment of a reference reach is key. </li></ul>Pitfall: Avoid the pattern of mitigation ‘ design by committee’ Tidally influenced stream application Perennial stream habitat enhancement techniques
  17. 17. <ul><li>The pattern by which a permit authority drives the design through specification of generic criteria which may or may not apply to the site . Common in fish passage permit discussions. </li></ul><ul><li>Solution is to define a Fish Passage Design Guideline and use it. USFS, ADOT, and NOAA all have published design guidelines. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t improvise. Departure from Guidelines should be documented when conditions preclude use of the Guideline. </li></ul>Pitfall: Avoid the pattern of mitigation ‘ design by criteria’
  18. 18. <ul><li>Development and regulatory community need to build in inherent lead time for the identification, planning, design, and implementation of habitat restoration projects, if they are to be a viable mitigation outcome. </li></ul><ul><li>Regulatory community needs to inventory and assess restoration opportunities across Southeast in order to provide practicable avenues for compliance with the Final Rule. </li></ul>Take Home:
  19. 19. <ul><li>Development community will have to invest in more expertise to ensure that specific designs accomplish the habitat restoration objectives of their mitigation. </li></ul><ul><li>All entities will benefit from moving away from a negotiation of acres/ratios/economic costs, and try to achieve functional restoration through a credible and replicable functional analysis of the habitats impacts and the habitats restored. </li></ul>Take Home:
  20. 20. <ul><li>Restoration as a mitigation outcome might be most successful on properties already or concurrently protected. </li></ul>Take Home: Channelized stream reach, Switzer Creek, Juneau Relic road fill
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