Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Porter s infolitassignment
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Porter s infolitassignment

380
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
380
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Porter 1 Information Literacy Lesson Plan Savannah Porter FRIT 7136 Dr. Stephanie Jones Fall 2009
  • 2. Porter 2 Title of Unit: Drama, Drama, Drama! Grade: 4 Content Area: Language Arts/Reading Time Frame: 3 – 4 weeks OVERVIEW OF UNIT This unit focuses on teaching 4th grade students how to choose a book in which to design and base a dramatic production while working with members of an assigned group. The classroom teacher will be discussing parts and elements involved in a dramatic production. In addition to this, she will be spending time each day doing a class read-aloud of Where the Red Fern Grows. The teacher will be using the book and movie versions of this text to portray an example of a dramatic production based on a well-known book. The overall goal of this unit will include students working in groups to design and implement a successful dramatic production based on a book of the group’s choice. The groups will each choose an appropriate text, develop a script based on the text chosen, assign characters, and perform a theatrical production. The role that I will take (as the potential media specialist) is to help each group chose an appropriate text, based on the group’s overall interest (and reading ability). In addition to this, I will also help students learn to work effectively in groups as well as assisting each group to generate information based on the chosen text (or book). STAGE 1 – DESIRED RESULTS Established Goals: Information Literacy Standards for Lesson/Unit: The student who is an independent learner is information literate and appreciates literature and other creative expressions of information. Indicators Indicator 1. Is a competent and self-motivated reader Indicator 2. Derives meaning from information presented creatively in a variety of formats Indicator 3. Develops creative products in a variety of formats The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and participates effectively in groups to pursue and generate information. Indicator 1. Shares knowledge and information with others Indicator 2. Respects others’ ideas and backgrounds and acknowledges their contributions Indicator 3. Collaborates with others, both in person and through technologies, to identify information problems and to seek their solutions
  • 3. Porter 3 Indicator 4. Collaborates with others, both in person and through technologies, to design, develop, and evaluate information products and solutions 4th Grade Georgia Performance Standards for Unit: ELA4LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to- student, and group verbal interactions. a. Initiates new topics in addition to responding to adult-initiated topics. b. Asks relevant questions. c. Responds to questions with appropriate information. d. Uses language cues to indicate different levels of certainty or hypothesizing (e.g., “What if. . .”; “Very likely. . .”; “I’m unsure whether. . .”). e. Confirms understanding by paraphrasing the adult’s directions or suggestions. f. Displays appropriate turn-taking behaviors. g. Actively solicits another person’s comments or opinions. h. Offers own opinion forcefully without domineering. i. Responds appropriately to comments and questions. j. Volunteers contributions and responds when directly solicited by teacher or discussion leader. k. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed. l. Clarifies, illustrates, or expands on a response when asked to do so; asks classmates for similar expansions. ELA4LSV2 The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas. When delivering or responding to presentations, the student: a. Shapes information to achieve a particular purpose and to appeal to the interests and background knowledge of audience members. b. Uses notes, multimedia, or other memory aids to structure the presentation. c. Engages the audience with appropriate verbal cues and eye contact. d. Projects a sense of individuality and personality in selecting and organizing content and in delivery. e. Shapes content and organization according to criteria ELA4R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. For literary texts, the student identifies the characteristics of various genres and produces evidence of reading that: a. Relates theme in works of fiction to personal experience. b. Identifies and analyzes the elements of plot, character, and setting in stories read, written, viewed, or performed. c. Identifies the speaker of a poem or story. d. Identifies sensory details and figurative language. e. Identifies and shows the relevance of foreshadowing clues.
  • 4. Porter 4 f. Makes judgments and inferences about setting, characters, and events and supports them with elaborating and convincing evidence from the text. g. Identifies similarities and differences between the characters or events and theme in a literary work and the actual experiences in an author’s life. h. Identifies themes and lessons in folktales, tall tales, and fables. i. Identifies rhyme and rhythm, repetition, similes, and sensory images in poems. For informational texts, the student reads and comprehends in order to develop understanding and expertise and produces evidence of reading that: a. Locates facts that answer the reader’s questions. b. Identifies and uses knowledge of common textual features (e.g., paragraphs, topic sentences, concluding sentences, glossary). c. Identifies and uses knowledge of common graphic features (e.g., charts, maps, diagrams, illustrations). d. Identifies and uses knowledge of common organizational structures (e.g., chronological order, cause and effect). e. Distinguishes cause from effect in context. f. Summarizes main ideas and supporting details. g. Makes perceptive and well-developed connections. h. Distinguishes fact from opinion or fiction. UNIT/LESSON UNDERSTANDINGS AND ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Understandings: Students will understand that… • Reading involves comprehension of the text in order to present it to others. • It is important to work effectively in group settings. • It is important to verbally express ideas, thoughts, and concerns to teachers or peers. • Literature comes in various genres. • Explain how to determine parts of a story. Essential Questions: • What is drama? • How can you turn text into a performance? • How do you determine the setting of a story? The plot? The characters? The climax? • What are the best books in which to base dramatic production? • Based on your groups’ interests, what would be the best genre of text for your group? • How do you work as a group to assign characters from a text to individuals? Knowledge: Students will know… • How to “become the character” to help better present information to an audience. • How to effectively work in group settings. Skills: Students will be able to… • Successfully present the meaning of a selected text to an audience. • Cooperatively work in a group • Identify the plot, characters, setting, and other story elements of literature.
  • 5. Porter 5 • Speak/perform clearly, with a purpose, in front of an audience. Lesson Materials and Equipment • LCD projector with computer connection • Computer installed with OPAC • Various books • Computer lab with 18 computers installed with OPAC • Access to media center Lesson Procedures and Activities I will work with the class three times per week, for approximately three weeks, or until all groups have successfully planned and produced a theatrical performance based on the group’s book of choice. Since there are several things going on with the class during this unit, I will be doing various lessons and activities with them. Also, because this is an ongoing project, there will be times that I am assisting the groups individually by discussing their ideas and decisions. With this said, some of the lessons will be more structured and planned than others. Planned Lessons/Activities: • To pull the students into the unit and concepts, the media specialist will play a “Charades-type” game. During this lesson, the media specialist pulls 4 to 5 students and has one student draw a well-known, short children’s book from a bag. The title of the story is kept a secret while the students work quickly to read their story, and then plan a short skit of the title that they chose. After some time has passed, the students come back together as each group presents their skit. The other groups not presenting at the time are to attempt to guess what story is being acted out. (Story books used: Three Little Pigs, Little Red Riding Hood, The Little Red Hen, Jack and the Beanstalk) After the story, the media specialist discusses the strategies that each group used to work together to present the information with the students. The media specialist will then discuss additional strategies to use while working in groups. • Similar charades game: this time, students will be given non-fiction books, books with numerous characters, or books with twisted plots to attempt to develop a dramatic production. Students and media specialist will develop a list of challenges that they faced while attempting to act out a story with no apparent beginning, middle, or end. The media specialist will then discuss the importance of choosing a book with a storyline, i.e. a grade appropriate fiction book. • Finding the right book for your group: The media specialist will help each group brainstorm a list of interests. (Many interests in this class in particular overlap, and the groups have been formed in regards to individuals’ interests.) The media specialist will then use the LCD projector to display the school’s cataloguing program. She will teach students to search for books by their interests using the “keyword” function.
  • 6. Porter 6 She will also express to them that they need to check the “fiction” box in order to get only fiction books in the results. She will present several examples, and then will give the students a pencil and a slip of paper with eight broad keywords listed on it. (Attached at the end of this packet.) The students will then go to the computer lab. They will be asked to search for five of the eight keywords and will be instructed to write down a title of a book that is listed in the search results. This will be used as an assessment. • After completing the keyword search assessment, students will work with their groups to search their own interests. As a group, they will search book titles and make a final selection. They will do this after narrowing their choices down to three books, locating the books in the media center, and reviewing the books. Once the final selection is made, the media specialist will approve the book to make sure that it is on grade level for that particular group as well as suitable for the project. Once these lessons have been implemented by the media specialist, she will continue to meet with the groups to encourage thinking, question group members’ ideas, as well as assist groups individually. Lesson Assessments • Developing a list of challenges found while using non-fiction books, books with difficult plots, books with numerous characters – each student will be called upon to list a challenge during this discussion (they will use sticky notes to record their idea, then they will present the idea and stick it to the poster paper) • “Keyword Search Assessment” -- This handout will evaluate the student’s ability to properly use the cataloging system • Final group presentations – see rubric attached at the end of this packet; Students will work as a group to perform an “adaptation” of a selected text for the enjoyment of a selected audience. Groups will select a scene from their novel, or create a paraphrased version of the entire piece. As a group, students must decide how best to present their selection in a dramatic form to successfully portray the information from the text to an audience. • Self-Assessment – see attached at the end of this packet • Self/Group Evaluation – see attached at the end of this packet Reflection This lesson and topic was very fun to implement. I learned a lot from these fourth graders! I am a pre-k teacher, and am now truly amazed at the knowledge that these children have! Since I am a pre-k teacher, I was a little apprehensive about working with fourth grade students. Much to my surprise, they were well behaved, they listened, and they all knew how to write! (Something I’m not used
  • 7. Porter 7 to in the pre-k world!) Overall, I felt that my lessons went great. The kids were all engaged – I was lucky, every student in the class loved to read. I was worried that I would have some students who did not want to or care to read or participate, but I was lucky that that wasn’t at all the case! It seemed that the students really looked forward to each day’s group work time and to my visits. I am pretty certain that it was only this way because the students were all engaged and interested in the material and the project that was being presented. I quickly saw that as long as you make sure the students are engaged and you are finding ways to make the learning process fun, you will more than likely have their full attention. The teacher that I collaborated with was excellent as well. She has taught fourth grade for 14 years and uses this topic as a big part of her curriculum each year. She was very helpful to me in planning, and offered lots of advice and ideas that I could work with. The one thing that I did not like about this collaboration was her busy schedule. We only met twice during the planning process of the lesson, but she promised me that we would “make it work” once we started with the kids. When the time came, she was right, and we did “make it work,” but it was a little stressful for me, and I would have rather talked about things more thoroughly with her. In addition to this, I also felt “out of the loop” in regards to what she was doing in her own classroom on the days that I was not there. I would have liked to have known more about what she was covering as far as the content standards go. I know that they students were getting additional group time to read and develop their scripts and time to practice their productions, but I didn’t get much feedback as to how that was working out. Every time that I was scheduled to “teach,” we went down to the media center (or to the computer lab) to spread out, use the tables, and have access to the books on hand, rather than checking them out. There are not many things that I would like to change about this lesson. I felt very good about the material that I presented, as well as the teaching methods that I used. Again, the one thing that I would like to change is the lack of communication between myself and the classroom teacher in regards to the additional lessons and activities that she was working on within her classroom. Assessment Results • Challenges List: all students recorded their thoughts on sticky notes. Each student successfully completed this assessment. This showed me that each student understood the importance of choosing a fiction book with limited characters and an easy-to-follow plot. • Keyword Search Assessment: all but three students successfully completed the keyword assessment by using OPAC. The three students who did not have success were given an additional, individual lesson on the using keywords and using OPAC. These students were then given a
  • 8. Porter 8 second “keyword assessment” in which they successfully completed. • The final group presentations were assessed by the classroom teacher and myself. We both scored the groups, and then compared our results. Only one group did not get the maximum amount of points. However, this was only because of a lack of effort on the whole group’s part. • The additional evaluations and group/peer reviews all resulted with positive feedback. According to the group evaluations, each group was very happy in working with the members of their groups and had no major problems.
  • 9. Porter 9 Keyword Search Assessment Pick any five of the keywords listed and search for a fiction book that is related to the keyword. Circle the keywords that you choose, and write the title of each the book that you find beside the keyword. You will need to go and look at the books before you write the title down to make sure that is does in fact match the keyword listed. • fish • a visit to the circus • farm life • school • a friendship • a vacation • being sick • wild west
  • 10. Porter 10 Final Presentation Rubric LEVEL ONE LEVEL TWO LEVEL THREE LEVEL FOUR ORAL COMMUNICATION: Use a variety of appropriate visual aids to support or enhance oral presentations, with limited effectiveness. Use a variety of appropriate visual aids to support or enhance oral presentations, with some effectiveness. Use a variety of appropriate visual aids to support or enhance oral presentations, with considerable effectiveness. Use a variety of appropriate visual aids to support or enhance oral presentations, with a high degree of effectiveness. APPLICATION Enact or create, rehearse, and present drama works based on novels, with limited effectiveness. (Effectiveness of group as a whole throughout process) Enact or create, rehearse, and present drama based on novels, with some effectiveness. Enact or create, rehearse, and present drama based on novels, with considerable effectiveness. Enact or create, rehearse, and present drama based on novels, with a high degree of effectiveness. COMMUNICATION/THINKING Describe and reflect, orally and in writing, on their response to their own and others’ work in drama with limited effectiveness (Self-evaluation) Describe and reflect, orally and in writing, on their response to their own and others’ work in drama with some effectiveness. Describe and reflect, orally and in writing, on their response to their own and others’ work in drama with considerable effectiveness. Describe and reflect, orally and in writing, on their response to their own and others’ work in drama with a high degree of effectiveness. KNOWLEDGE Demonstrate awareness of audience when writing in role, and use the appropriate language, tone of voice, gestures, and body movements when speaking as a character in a drama, with limited effectiveness. (Use of voice, gestures, body movements, etc. as character) Demonstrate awareness of audience when writing in role, and use the appropriate language, tone of voice, gestures, and body movements when speaking as a character in a drama, with some effectiveness. Demonstrate awareness of audience when writing in role, and use the appropriate language, tone of voice, gestures, and body movements when speaking as a character in a drama, with considerable effectiveness. Demonstrate awareness of audience when writing in role, and use the appropriate language, tone of voice, gestures, and body movements when speaking as a character in a drama, with a high degree of effectiveness. READING Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them, with limited effectiveness. (Connectedness to original text) Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them, with some effectiveness. Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them, with considerable effectiveness. Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them, with a high degree of effectiveness. WRITING Write longer and more complex texts using a variety of forms with limited effectiveness. (Script writing) Write longer and more complex texts using a variety of forms with some effectiveness. Write longer and more complex texts using a variety of forms with considerable effectiveness. Write longer and more complex texts using a variety of forms with a high degree of effectiveness.
  • 11. Porter 11 SELF-ASSESSMENT NAME: _______________________ In the space below, write your personal observations about the following: 1. What I learned about myself while doing this assignment: 2. What I learned about others in my group: 3. What I learned about creating and performing a drama presentation like this (strengths, weaknesses): 4. What I’d do differently next time: 5. What I was most proud of: 6. What I was most embarrassed by:
  • 12. Porter 12 SELF/GROUP EVALUATION Rate yourself and your group members CONFIDENTIALLY here, giving each person level that you feel they deserve. No one will see your scoring but me. SCALE: 1 – Never worked or helped with the group. 2 – Did some work, but not very much work with the group. Did not help much. 3 – Sometimes worked with the group and helped. 4 – Almost always worked with the group and helped. 5 – Always worked with the group and was always helping. List group members’ names, and rate them: NAME RATE ___________________ ______ ___________________ ______ ___________________ ______ ___________________ ______ ___________________ ______ Now, rate yourself: ______