HARTWELL DAM AND LAKE      50th ANNIVERSARY        CELEBRATION          April 27, 2012  ®                           BUILDI...
WELCOMEOn behalf of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, welcome to the50th Anniversary Celebration of Har...
HARTWELL DAM & LAKE                                50th YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION                                      ...
RICHARD C. LOCKWOODChief, Operations & Regulatory DivisionHeadquarters USACERichard C. Lockwood currently serves as the Ch...
Carol E. BurdetteA native of Pendleton, S.C., and lifetime Anderson County resident, Carol E. Burdettebecame Pendleton’s f...
Alan WillifordAlan Williford is the Manager of Planning and Engineering for Alabama Municipal ElectricAuthority (AMEA). In...
AUTHORIZATION…Then and NowHartwell Dam and Lake was the second U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Multipurpose Water Resources D...
EARLY HISTORY OF THE REGIONThe Hartwell region abounds in historical lore, much of it inherited from the Cherokee Indians ...
TRANSFORMATION…River to Dam and Lake           Clearing Ga. & S.C. Embankments,                      Constructing the Ga. ...
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers thanks the following individuals and organizations for their support to theHartwell Dam a...
Hartwell Dam 50th Anniversary Program
Hartwell Dam 50th Anniversary Program
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Hartwell Dam 50th Anniversary Program

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Here's the program presented at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers commemoration ceremony for the 50th Anniversary of the Hartwell Dam and Lake Project, April 27, 2012.

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Hartwell Dam 50th Anniversary Program

  1. 1. HARTWELL DAM AND LAKE 50th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION April 27, 2012 ® BUILDING STRONG ®
  2. 2. WELCOMEOn behalf of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, welcome to the50th Anniversary Celebration of Hartwell Dam and Lake Project! This day representsan historic milestone in Hartwell’s past and present. On this very day in 1962, theHartwell Powerplant generated and put on-line the first electricity from its newhydroelectric facility. Now, several generations later, we remember the people whomade it possible. Today we honor the many people who contributed to the Hartwellresource: the electricians, hydrologists, mechanics, powerplant operators, engineers,planners, park rangers, scientists, community advocates, Congressmen and women,and many kind-hearted volunteers who have donated their time and talents to theHartwell Project. Today, we remember stories and people of the past while wecelebrate 50 years of “Monument to Progress.” I’d like to thank everyone in attendance today for your support to theHartwell Project. Whether you’re a current or former employee, a community leader or member of an interest group,a customer, a stakeholder, a volunteer—your service and contributions have played a role in the development andsustainment of this valuable Hartwell resource. Thanks for all you do!- Col. Jeffrey M. Hall, Commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah DistrictHave you subscribed to our free e-newsletter?Stay up-to-date on water management, news and events on the Savannah River Basin by subscribing to oure-newsletter, Balancing the Basin. This free, quarterly publication brings updates and information directly to yourinbox. To subscribe, simply send a message with “Subscribe” in the subject line to CESAS-CCO@usace.army.milYou can also view the e-newsletter on our website anytime by visiting www.sas.usace.army.mil Look for the “DistrictPublications” box on the homepage and click the Balancing the Basin icon, or click the “NEWSROOM” tab at the topof the homepage.The Savannah District launched the e-newsletter in January 2011 to foster communication with stakeholders,community groups, congressional staffs, federal and state natural resources agencies, private citizens, and newsmedia on the Corps’ water management actions. It also covers environmental concerns, recreation opportunities, andrelated issues at the reservoirs. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District Find us on the web and social media: www.sas.usace.army.mil
  3. 3. HARTWELL DAM & LAKE 50th YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION APRIL 27, 2012 at 1:00Musical Entertainment………………...............U.S. Army Signal Corps Band, Garden City Brass Quintet, Fort Gordon, Ga. Staff Sergeant Ryan Fussell, Non-commissioned Officer in ChargeWelcome/ Introduction of Official Party ……………….…..........................................Carol Burdette, Mistress of CeremoniesPresentation of Colors…………………...............………………Color Guard, Installation Support Battalion, Fort Gordon, Ga.The National Anthem…..................……………………………………Holly Muttitt, Clerical Assistant, Hartwell Dam and LakePledge of Allegiance…………...........………….……...Zachary Harkness, Recreation Chief Ranger, Hartwell Dam and LakeInvocation…….……............………………...………...........……………….....Captain George H. Smith III, Battalion Chaplain, 1st Battalion, 214th Field Artillery, Elberton, Ga.Opening Remarks…………………...........………………...........………..……George Bramlette, Operations Project Manager, Hartwell Dam and LakeSouth Atlantic Division Remarks…..…………...………...........……..…………...Colonel Eric R. Conrad, Deputy Commander U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, South Atlantic DivisionDistrict Commander’s Remarks……………...........………………...………...........….….Colonel Jeffrey M. Hall, Commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah DistrictSpecial Recognition….……………...........………………...….…......Alan Williford, Colonel Jeffrey M. Hall, George Bramlette Keynote Speaker……………………..........……………….....……….Richard Lockwood, Chief of Operations and Regulatory, Headquarters U.S. Army Corps of EngineersRemarks……………………………………................…Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator, South Eastern Power AdministrationRemarks…………………............…...............Alan Williford, Vice President, Southeastern Federal Power Customers Group Remarks……………………………………………………….......………...Herb Burnham, President, Lake Hartwell AssociationRemarks …………………………………...................……………...Larry Torrance, Director, Lake Hartwell Marketing AllianceClosing Remarks………………………….....................……………………………………………………………...Carol BurdetteRetiring of Colors…………………………………...........……………….....…………………………..………………..Color GuardThe Army Song and Essayons ……………...............….………………………………………………Garden City Brass Quintet Reception at the Hartwell Powerplant follows. Guests can also go on a guided tour of the powerplant. The tour concludes at the top of the dam, where guests may ride the shuttle back to the parking area.
  4. 4. RICHARD C. LOCKWOODChief, Operations & Regulatory DivisionHeadquarters USACERichard C. Lockwood currently serves as the Chief of Operations and Regulatory for the U.S. Army Corps ofEngineers (USACE) Headquarters in Washington, D.C. In his role, Lockwood provides direction, guidance andassistance to all USACE Divisions and Districts on all matters in the Operations and Regulatory arenas.Lockwood’s previous assignments include Regional Business Director for the USACE Mississippi ValleyDivision, and Chief of the Operations and Readiness Division at the USACE Pittsburgh District. Before that,he served multiple positions with the Corps’ Philadelphia District, North Atlantic Division and Marine DesignCenter. Lockwood also deployed for recovery operations in response to hurricanes Katrina and Rita, served asMississippi River Division Operations Chief, and has been the USACE Champion for Asset Management andRivers Information Services.Lockwood also spent several years in private sector, primarily working in the oil and mineral exploration industry. His positions encompassed thedesign, construction, maintenance and repair of offshore support vessels in Singapore, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, Southeast Asia, SouthwestAsia, Alaska and South America.Lockwood holds a Bachelor of Science in marine engineering and maritime transportation, a master’s degree in engineering management, a NavalReserve Commission, U.S. Coast Guard Deck and Engine licenses, and an FCC License. He is a graduate of the National Leadership Instituteand the Corps’ Executive Leadership Development Program and is a member of multiple professional engineering organizations.COLONEL ERIC R.P. CONRAD,Deputy Commander,South Atlantic DivisionCol. Eric R.P. Conrad currently serves as the Deputy Commander for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers(USACE), South Atlantic Division in Atlanta, Ga. He has leadership and oversight of a wide variety of military,environmental, and water resource projects in eight southeastern states, from Virginia to Mississippi, alongwith the Caribbean, Central and South America. The South Atlantic Division includes five Districts: Charleston,S.C.; Jacksonville, Fla.; Mobile, Ala.; Savannah, Ga.; and Wilmington, N.C.Before joining the Corps of Engineers in 2010, Conrad held multiple assignments in the U.S. and abroad. Hismost recent assignment was the Deputy Commander of Operations Group for the Joint Readiness TrainingCenter at Fort Polk, La., and Special Troops Battalion Senior Trainer for the 502nd Regiment, 101st AirborneDivision (Air Assault) at Fort Campbell, Ky. He served in multiple leadership positions at Fort Benning, Ga.;Bamberg, Germany; and Fort Lewis, Wash. Conrad also served as an instructor with the Department ofMathematical Sciences at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y. He has also deployed in support ofOperation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation Desert Storm.Conrad holds a Bachelor of Science in physics from the U.S. Military Academy and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant with the U.S. ArmyCorps of Engineers upon graduation in 1986. Conrad also holds a master’s degree in applied math modeling from Reassalear Polytechnic Institutein Troy, N.Y. His military education includes the Engineer Officer Basic Course, Engineer Officer Advanced Course, the Combined Arms ServiceStaff School and the US Army Command and General Staff Course.Conrad will become Commander of the South Atlantic Division on May 4, 2012.JEFFREY M. HALLCommander,Savannah DistrictCol. Jeffrey M. Hall assumed command of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Savannah District onJune 4, 2010. As District Commander, Hall oversees the Savannah District’s $2.3 billion military constructionprogram at 11 Army and Air Force installations in Georgia and North Carolina; water resource activities ineastern Georgia and portions of South Carolina; and wetland protection in Georgia. The Savannah Districtalso performs work in military design and master planning; hazardous, toxic and radioactive waste clean-upat formerly used defense sites; real estate activities for the Department of Defense; emergency managementoperations for state and federal agencies; and supports Overseas Contingency Operations.Hall came to the Savannah District following an assignment as the Command Engineer for the Army and AirForce Exchange Services (AAFES), a global military retailer, where he led a $2.5 billion capital constructionprogram and oversaw the maintenance of 3,100 facilities in 35 countries, five U.S. territories, and all 50 states.Prior to his AAFES command, Hall served in numerous engineer command and staff positions in the United States and overseas, includingassignments with U.S. Pacific Command, USACE Buffalo District, Kosovo Force Headquarters, NATO, the 1st Calvary Division and V Corps. Hewas first commissioned as a Second Lieutenant with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1984.Hall holds a Bachelor of Science in geology from Trinity University in San Antonio, a Master of Science in general administration from CentralMichigan University, and a Master of Science in strategic studies from the U.S. Army War College.
  5. 5. Carol E. BurdetteA native of Pendleton, S.C., and lifetime Anderson County resident, Carol E. Burdettebecame Pendleton’s first female mayor in 1997 and served three terms until 2009.Over the past 25 years, Burdette has served on multiple committees, boards andcommissions in Pendleton, Anderson County, and throughout the upstate regions of SouthCarolina. Since 2002, Carol has been the Chief Professional Officer of United Way ofAnderson County.Burdette currently serves on the Board of Visitors at Anderson University; the Board ofDirectors and Executive Committee of Ten at the Top, a non-profit organization that fostersregional collaboration within the 10-county upstate South Carolina region; and the Boardof Directors of Sister Cities International, a nonprofit citizen diplomacy network that createspartnerships between U.S. and international cities.Burdette has previously served as Board Chair of the YMCA of Anderson; President of the Rotary Club of Anderson;Campaign and Board Chair for United Way of Anderson County; Board Chair of the Anderson Area Chamber ofCommerce; Rotary District Governor; President of Advance S.C.; President of the Municipal Association of SouthCarolina; and Chairman of the South Carolina Association of Non Profit Organizations.She attended Anderson County public schools and graduated from Southern Wesleyan University in 1982 with a Bachelorof Science in psycology. She was first elected to Pendleton Town Council in 1987.George BramletteGeorge Bramlette is the Operations Project Manager for the U.S. Army Corps of EngineersHartwell Dam and Lake Project. Bramlette is responsible for full-spectrum operations of theHartwell project, including the Congressionally-authorized functions of water supply and waterquality, flood risk management, navigation, hydropower, fish and wildlife management andrecreation. He oversees nearly 56,000 acres of water, 962 miles of shoreline, and one of thetop three most most-visited projects in the Corps.A native of Greenville, S.C., Bramlette has worked all facets of operations from both theproject and district level during his 32 years of federal service with the Corps of Engineers.Bramlette began his career in 1979 as a park ranger at the J. Strom Thurmond Projectin Clarks Hill, S.C., then transferred to the Hartwell Project in 1980. He re-located to theCorps’ Mobile District in 1982, where he worked at the Lake Seminole Project Office andat the Mobile District Headquarters as a Natural Resources Manager. Bramlette returned tothe Savannah District in 1994 as the Natural Resources Manager for the Hartwell Project, where he was responsible formanaging the largest shoreline use program in the Corps.Bramlette holds a Bachelor of Science from Clemson University, class of 1979, in recreation and parks administration withan emphasis in natural resources management.Kenneth E. LeggKenneth E. Legg (Ken) is the Administrator for Southeastern Power Administration(Southeastern). Before his appointment as Administrator in July 2008, he was Southeastern’sAssistant Administrator, Division of Power Resources. Before relocating to Elberton, Ga., in2003, he was Director of Engineering and Planning for Southwestern Power Administration(Southwestern) in Tulsa, Okla.Legg’s federal career spans 38 years in the power and energy field. He began his careerin 1974 as an engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Tulsa District. In 1978, hebecame an electrical engineer with Southwestern. In 1980, he was promoted to PublicUtilities Specialist, and then in 1988 named Assistant to the Administrator at Southwestern.Legg was born and raised in Bartlesville, Okla. He holds a Bachelor of Science in electricalengineering from Oklahoma State University. He is married to Kay Legg, who is a financial advisor and directs regionaltheatre performances with Savannah River Productions, Inc.
  6. 6. Alan WillifordAlan Williford is the Manager of Planning and Engineering for Alabama Municipal ElectricAuthority (AMEA). In his role, he is responsible for AMEA’s long-term power supplyneeds, load forecasting and production cost modeling.With more than 23 years of experience in the electric utility industry, Williford has workedclosely in the areas of relay and control, system protection, substation construction andcommissioning, supervisor control and data acquisition, and power supply. Before joiningAMEA in 1999, he worked for Oglethorpe Power Corporation, Georgia TransmissionCorporation, Mississippi Power and Light, and Gulf Power Company.Williford currently serves as Vice President of the Southeastern Federal PowerCustomers (SeFPC) Inc. and was previously secretary of the organization for twoconsecutive terms. SeFPC represents the hydropower interests of cooperatives and municipal systems in Alabama,Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia, which serve morethan six million customers.Williford holds a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of Alabama.Herb BurnhamHerb Burnham is the President of the Lake Hartwell Association (LHA), an organizationformed 21 years ago “for the sake of the lake.” LHA works to ensure continuedprotection and enhanced value of the Hartwell resource. LHA advocates on behalf ofits members in the areas of water policy, water quality, safety and state and federalregulations and keeps members current on critical issues and changes in regulationsthat could impact them. Burnham has served as president of LHA since 2009.Burnham is retired from Fluor Corporation in Greenville, S.C., where he managedboth domestic and international home office and project teams as a member of Fluor’sworldwide engineering and construction operations. He first accepted a managerialposition with Fluor in 1974 and retired as a senior manager after 27 years of service.Before his employment with Fluor, Burnham served in the U.S. Air Force as an electronics and nuclear weaponsinstructor. He also worked for Lockheed Martin in the early days of America’s Space Program. His most memorableassignments included supporting launch teams at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., and working in the AstronautOffices and Mission Control in Houston, Texas.Larry J. TorrenceLarry J. Torrence founded the Lake Hartwell Marketing Alliance (LHMA) in 2009 andcurrently serves as Chairman of that organization. LHMA promotes tourism, recreationand economic development of Lake Hartwell, representing three counties in Georgia andthree counties in South Carolina.A native of Hartwell, Ga., Torrence was a teenager when the dam was built. He hasclose ties to the lake and the various communities surrounding Hartwell.He has a professional career in Golf Course Community Development, with projects inCashiers, Pinehurst and Sanford, N.C.; Atlanta and Greensboro, Ga., Beaufort, S.C.,and Hamilton, Bermuda. Two of his golf developments were named “Best New Golf Clubof the Year” by Golf Digest.Torrence holds a Bachelor of Arts in marketing from the University of Georgia and performed graduate work atFairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey. Torrence is also active in Golden Retriever rescue activities.
  7. 7. AUTHORIZATION…Then and NowHartwell Dam and Lake was the second U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Multipurpose Water Resources DevelopmentProject in the Savannah River Basin. Authorized by Congress under the Flood Control Act of 1950, the Hartwell Projectwas built between 1955 to 1963 for the purposes of hydropower, flood control, and downstream navigation. Additionalauthorized purposes of the project now include water supply, water quality, recreation, and fish and wildlife management.Filling of the lake began in February 1961 and was completed in March 1962. The Powerplant first producedcommercially-available hydroelectric power on April 27, 1962 with Generator Unit One. The total cost of the HartwellProject was $89 million.Hartwell Lake lies within Georgia and South Carolina on the Savannah, Tugaloo and Seneca Rivers. The lake is createdby the Hartwell Dam, located on the Savannah River seven miles below the point at which the Tugaloo and Seneca Riversjoin to form the Savannah River. Extending 49 miles up the Tugaloo and 45 miles up the Seneca at normal pool elevation,Hartwell Lake comprises nearly 56,000 acres of water with a shoreline of 962 miles. The entire Hartwell Project contains76,450 acres of land and water. Interstate 85 bisects Hartwell Lake and makes the area easily accessible to visitors.When the dam was constructed, five penstocks were provided for the installation of four 66,000-kilowatt generating unitsand a future 80,000-kilowatt unit. The fifth unit was completed in 1985, bringing the total generating capacity to 344,000kilowatts. The rehabilitation of units 1 through 4 from 1997 to 2000 increased the total generating capacity to 422,000kilowatts. The electricity generated at the Hartwell Project is marketed by the Southeastern Power Administration (SEPA)to more than 491 preference customers in the states of Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, southern Illinois, Virginia,Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, and South Carolina.Today, the Hartwell Project generates on average more than 468 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year—enoughenergy to meet the annual needs of more than 46,000 households. Hartwell also remains one of the top three most-visitedCorps lakes in the nation, attracting 10 million visitors every year.
  8. 8. EARLY HISTORY OF THE REGIONThe Hartwell region abounds in historical lore, much of it inherited from the Cherokee Indians who once roamed hereand from the early settlers who pioneered the area. Many local streams, rivers and recreation areas bear colorfulIndian names. Some streams allegedly were named by Issaqueena, a young Indian maiden who rode to Fort Ninety-Six to warn settlers of an impending attack. On her journey, she marked her travel by naming the streams that sheencountered for the number of miles she had covered, accounting for the names of Six-Mile, Twelve-Mile, Twenty-Three Mile and Twenty-Six Mile creeks, which are part of the lake today. Before and during the Revolutionary War,the region was a hotbed of anti-British activity. Nancy Hart, for whom Hart County, Ga., Hartwell, Ga., and HartwellDam and Lake subsequently were named, was renowned for her heroic exploits on behalf of the patriot cause. Otherhistoric figures who lived in the immediate region of Hartwell Lake were Andrew Pickens and John C. Calhoun, botheminent statesmen from South Carolina. Also, William Bartram, foremost botanist in the late 1700’s, traveled theregion which is Hartwell Lake today, recording vegetation types and plant species and noting his observations on theIndians in his Travels.PROJECT FACTS AND FIGURES• Hartwell is the only U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Powerplant with generator housings outside the plant.• Fiscal Year 2011 revenue from hydropower program at Hartwell exceeded $11 million.• Hartwell Dam is 17,790 feet long (1,900 feet concrete structure flanked by earthen embankments).• The dam height is 204 feet above the river bed.• Hartwell Lake is approximately 180 feet deep at the dam.• The Hartwell Dam contains more than 880,000 cubic yards of concrete and three million pounds of reinforcing steel.• The 568-foot long spillway contains 12 gates each measuring 35.5 feet by 40 feet.• In addition to the main dam structure, the project included the construction of two diversion dams to divert theSeneca River around Clemson University, preventing 390 acres of campus inundation.• The project has prevented an estimated $70 million worth of flood damage since construction.• Hartwell Lake is consistently one of the top three most visited Corps of Engineers projects nationwide, averagingapproximately 10 million visitors annually.• The Corps operates 50 recreation areas on Hartwell Lake. In addition there are four state parks, five commercialmarinas, and numerous recreation areas operated by local municipalities.• The Corps manages the largest Shoreline Management Program in the nation at Hartwell Lake, administeringapproximately 12,000 permits for boat docks and other facilities on public lands.
  9. 9. TRANSFORMATION…River to Dam and Lake Clearing Ga. & S.C. Embankments, Constructing the Ga. & S.C. Embankments, November 22, 1955 December 6, 1956 The Savannah River flowing through the dam under The concrete and earthen dams being joined construction, June 10, 1959 together, August 12, 1960 Construction of the powerplant begins, August 12, 1960 Hartwell Lake at full pool, 1962 Hartwell Powerplant’s new fishing pier, 2010
  10. 10. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers thanks the following individuals and organizations for their support to theHartwell Dam and Lake 50th Anniversary Celebration: Anderson County Chamber of Commerce Anderson County Museum Anderson County Visitor’s Bureau The Bowers House, Franklin County, Ga. David Coughlin, Local Historian and Author Emmanuel College, Franklin Springs, Ga. Franklin County Chamber of Commerce Georgia State Patrol Hart County Arts Center Hart County Chamber of Commerce Hart County EMS Hart County Sherriff’s Department Lake Hartwell Association Lake Hartwell Marketing Alliance Madren Conference Center, Clemson University Oconee County Chamber of Commerce Oconee Exhibit Venue Pickens County Chamber of Commerce Pickens City Hall Southeastern Federal Power Customers Southeastern Power Administration Stephens County Chamber of Commerce Stephens County Exhibit Venue United Way of Anderson, S.C. ® BUILDING STRONG ®

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