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WIN Interviews
By Louise Garver
and Christine Edick
20660 Stevens Creek Blvd., Suite 210
Cupertino, CA 95014
The New Must-...
ii
Copyright © 2014 by Louise Garver and Christine Edick
All rights reserved. No part of this book shall be reproduced, st...
iii
Praise For This Book!
“Louise and Christine have provided a clear, succinct blueprint for
moving from ‘I need a new jo...
iv
“I’d like to commend Louise on her new book as it provides crystal
clear direction for job seekers to follow in order t...
v
Win Interviews! The New Must-Have Game Plan
Career Focus, Personal Branding, Resume, Professional Bios,
and Online Profi...
vi
Become the CEO of you. Think of yourself as a company of one—
YOU, INC. If you’re actively job hunting while unemployed...
vii
If you are unemployed, you should
be spending at least thirty-five hours
a week on your search. If currently
employed,...
viii	 Contentsviii	 Contents
	Introduction	 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1
		Compa...
WIN Interviews	 ix
		The Fundamentals of a Winning Resume . . . . 37
		Cover Letters for Different Audiences . . . . . 59
...
WIN Interviews	 1
Companies Are Changing
Their Hiring Process
There has been a slight improvement in the
interview and hir...
2	 Introduction
provided for the job opportunity carefully as it
will contain clues to key skills and behaviors.
If this i...
WIN Interviews	 3
New Job Market: Are You
Prepared?
As a job seeker, you may have experienced
many changes in the job mark...
4	 Introduction
“How are you more qualified to do this job
than the other applicants?”
3.	 Follow industry trends. Up to n...
Chapter 1: Focus and Set Goals	 5
C h a p t e r
Career Audit
Are you ready for change? When was the last time
you took a s...
6	 WIN Interviews
causing one or more of the statements above to be true.
How do you get back on track?
1.	 Start with a c...
Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search	 7
C h a p t e r
Career Action Plan
What’s standing in your way? Out of about 6,580
pr...
8	 WIN Interviews
These questions generally get a person thinking about what’s most
important and what they can put aside ...
Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search	 9
Create a Job Search Marketing Plan
We have all heard the phrase “start
with the end...
10	 WIN Interviews
Once you have completed this chart, you can begin to evaluate where
you stand in relation to the positi...
Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search	 11
Identify where your target industry hangs out.
Having the opportunity to connect w...
12	 WIN Interviews
promise of value, attributes, competitive advantage blended with
your successful history.
2.	 E-Career ...
Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search	 13
all point to a rate of more than 60 percent of jobs being found through
networking...
14	 WIN Interviews
of conversations. Don’t forget social media, checking company/people
profiles on LinkedIn and Facebook....
Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search	 15
is looking for job seekers who think out of the box and discover what
opportunitie...
16	 WIN Interviews
4.	 It goes without saying that checking the company out on Google
is helpful as well. You can find if ...
Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers	 17
C h a p t e r
So what is your
brand? At its core,
your bra...
18	 WIN Interviews
seekers need to clearly communicate their professional brand—the
impressive things they have done and t...
Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers	 19
Leadership Style:
1.	 How do you motivate others?
2.	 How ...
20	 WIN Interviews
candidates?” Consider the answer to that question as something
that should be included in your personal...
Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers	 21
3.	 Use accomplishment-focused, metrics-driven examples to...
22	 WIN Interviews
eliminated candidates after they found negative information about
them from online sites like Facebook....
Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers	 23
Google Alerts
You should also set up Google Alerts for you...
24	 WIN Interviews
Use quotation marks to make your search more specific. You will get a
preview of the search results in ...
Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers	 25
Access Google’s Me on the Web here:
https://www.google.com...
26	 WIN Interviews
A new screen will pop up where you can choose what you want to be
alerted for. Typically, Google will a...
Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers	 27
You can also subscribe to online services to monitor and m...
28	 WIN Interviews
Although your Google search results may have returned thousands (or
hundreds of thousands) of results, ...
Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers	 29
Another key setting is Past Post Visibility.
When you clic...
30	 WIN Interviews
Another important step is to see how the public views your profile. You
can check this with Facebook’s ...
Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers	 31
of that photo. If, however, the unwanted content resides o...
32	 WIN Interviews
Finally, select the reason you want it removed and hit the “Request”
button. Make sure you choose the r...
Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers	 33
“People search” sites make money by selling your personal ...
34	 WIN Interviews
Reputation Management is Not a One-Time Thing
Social recruiting isn’t going away. A 2011 Jobvite Social...
Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors	 35
C h a p t e r
What Hiring Managers
and Recruiters Loo...
36	 WIN Interviews
one hundred employees (29%) to more than five thousand employees
(4%) in the following categories: busi...
Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors	 37
How long does your organization keep resumes on file?...
38	 WIN Interviews
points for the quick skim resumes receive. Boldface type emphasizes
titles and key strengths. There sho...
Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors	 39
Functional – This style of resume showcases accomplis...
40	 WIN Interviews
Combination/Multinational – This style combines some of the features
of a chronological and functional ...
Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors	 41
JOHN JONES  Page 2
SENIOR V.P., PRODUCT MANAGEMENT (...
42	 WIN Interviews
JOHN JONES  Page 3
RESUME ADDENDUM
Industry Leadership / Board Memberships:
Chair, Board of Directors:...
Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors	 43
your expertise and industry. Languages, degrees, or c...
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  1. 1. WIN Interviews By Louise Garver and Christine Edick 20660 Stevens Creek Blvd., Suite 210 Cupertino, CA 95014 The New Must-Have Game Plan
  2. 2. ii Copyright © 2014 by Louise Garver and Christine Edick All rights reserved. No part of this book shall be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without written permission from the publisher. Published by Happy About® , a THiNKaha® imprint 20660 Stevens Creek Blvd., Suite 210, Cupertino, CA 95014 http://happyabout.com 1st Edition: March 2014 eBook ISBN: 978-1-60005-251-4 (1-60005-251-7) Place of Publication: Silicon Valley, California, USA Trademarks All terms mentioned in this book that are known to be trademarks or service marks have been appropriately capitalized. Neither THiNKaha® , (the parent company of Happy About® ) nor any of its imprints, can attest to the accuracy of this information. Use of a term in this book should not be regarded as affecting the validity of any trademark or service mark. Warning and Disclaimer Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and as accurate as possible. The information provided is on an “as is” basis. The author(s), publisher, and its agents assume no responsibility for errors or omissions nor assume liability or responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damages arising from the use of information contained herein.
  3. 3. iii Praise For This Book! “Louise and Christine have provided a clear, succinct blueprint for moving from ‘I need a new job’ to ‘I’ve got an interview. ’And there is no doubt that they know their stuff. In fact, Louise and Christine are two of my go-to coaches for my executive resume clients – I turn to them for their expertise in helping job seekers navigate today’s complex world of career management. Their book is on the money, to the point, and extremely valuable.” Louise Kursmark, MRW, CPRW, JCTC, CEIP, CCM; Executive Resume Writer / Career Consultant / Author / Speaker; Your Best Impression “Take the angst out of landing the interview with easy, understandable, step-by-step instructions!” Susan Britton Whitcomb, author of 8 careers books, including Resume Magic, and founder of TheAcademies.com for career coach training. “As an Executive Recruiter, I deal with many candidates who lack a GAME PLAN when they start a search. Louise and Christine delineate in the clearest of terms the action steps necessary to execute a winning strategy. Of special interest to me is the section on Personal Branding. I wish all my candidates had this in their professional job search tool boxes. The advice offered is timely and very practical.” Michael Robinson, Ph.D., Master Club Manager, Robinson Club Consultants “If Christine Edick and Louise Garver wrote it, then I know it’s sage advice! I’ve known both of these career experts for 15+ years, and have nothing but admiration for their knowledge and their contributions to the careers industry. This book is another exceptional offering ... valuable lessons in the intricacies of job search and how to position yourself as THE winning candidate. A must-read for every job seeker and a valuable resource for every career professional.” Wendy Enelow, CCM, MRW, JCTC, CPRW - Co-Founder & Executive Director - Career Thought Leaders Consortium
  4. 4. iv “I’d like to commend Louise on her new book as it provides crystal clear direction for job seekers to follow in order to achieve success in today’s job market. I know that the content is spot on as I work with job candidates on a daily basis in my search firm. Many candidates struggle with creating, articulating, and correlating their career successes to the opportunity they are competing for. Your advice provides a great blueprint for success. Congratulations and best of luck!” Ken Diamond, President, Digital Action Executive Search Founder, & CEO of WinTheView.com
  5. 5. v Win Interviews! The New Must-Have Game Plan Career Focus, Personal Branding, Resume, Professional Bios, and Online Profiles The world of work has changed. Suddenly, the game plan looks and feels completely different, and no one gave you the new rules. Job search truly is a different game than it was even a few years ago. You may have the dilemma of what to do or how to accelerate your search. What needs to be done first? What should I avoid? Who can I turn to for help? What is the best investment of my time and money? Having a clearly defined professional brand is no longer optional. Employers want to know what differentiates you from your job-seeking competitors, not how you’re the same. They want to see hard skills linked to your softer ones, indicating who you are, what you’re like to work with, and how your strengths will translate to dollars for them. Your resume needs to be a targeted, brand-reinforcing, career marketing communication. Supplementing your resume with a professional bio, a compilation paper, and digital documents is key to success in job search today. A strong online presence is also essential when in job search mode. You may not feel comfortable putting yourself out there, but without an online identity, you don’t exist and may be completely invisible to recruiters and other hiring managers who source and assess candidates by what they find about them online. You need to transform your portfolio of career documents into a LinkedIn profile that’s a magnet for recruiters and hiring decision makers. But LinkedIn is just one critical component in building an online presence and leveraging social media. Having a solid, continuously nurtured network is like having health insurance for your career. Your real-life and social networks need to be ever primed for you to tap into for new opportunities, introductions, and hot leads and to help you penetrate the “hidden job market.” Approach your job search from the POV of “What problems can I solve for you?” Every employer’s first question to job candidates is: “What can you do to make life better/ easier/more profitable for me?” Market yourself as a solution. Debra O’Reilly If you aren’t Internet savvy or don’t know how to use online resources, consider taking a class or borrowing books from your library. Your library is an extremely valuable resource. Jill Grindle
  6. 6. vi Become the CEO of you. Think of yourself as a company of one— YOU, INC. If you’re actively job hunting while unemployed, finding a job is your new nine-to-five job. You have to devote full days to launching and managing your job search campaign—if you want to land the job you deserve. Overall, you need to change your thinking and the way you approach career management in the digital world, whether or not a career transition is in your immediate future. * * * * * Employees at any level may experience job loss, and when that happens, they can feel powerless. This type of devastating experience can also affect a job seeker’s sense of authority and identity, especially when he/she has no control over the circumstances. The outlook can look less than dim knowing that there are fewer positions at the top. A reality check to gain perspective is important for a job seeker to move forward and look for the future potential opportunities. An important element of any job search campaign is to utilize your best project management skills. Strategic thinking, preparation, planning and organizational skills, along with a little common sense, will help you be successful. Implement your plan with determination as rejection can be right around the corner. An individual in the midst of a job search encounters unreturned phone calls, limited response to direct mail, or repeated rejection. There can be many reasons for this, so don’t take it personally—it is part of the process. Like any project, managing the interim objectives and measuring success in small stages is key to maintaining a healthy attitude. Career change comes with pros and cons. On the plus side, there is greater satisfaction to be gained if you are making the change for the right reasons. Typically, people who are happy in their jobs are healthier; and along with that, the positive demeanor has a ripple effect on their personal life too. One of the most effective career collaterals in job search/interviewing is the strategic use of the 30-, 60-, 90-day business plan as part of the follow-up “thank- you” letter-writing process. Sent in the body of an email within 24 hours of an in- person job interview, this two- to three-page document reiterates a candidate’s value proposition, recaps key ‘points of pain’ shared in the interview, and presents ideas as to approaches to be taken, preliminary strategies, suggested solutions, and a working game plan for the first 30, 60, and 90 days in position if hired. Jan Melnik
  7. 7. vii If you are unemployed, you should be spending at least thirty-five hours a week on your search. If currently employed, spending ten to fifteen hours a week is essential to get momentum. Spending less time on job search could slow down the process and extend the time you spend looking for another job. Strengthen your success factors with a strong foundation, a career action plan, and organized job search tasks. If you are unemployed, make looking for work a full-time job. It is also important to maintain your recreational, social, and fitness plans in order to avoid burn-out. Jill Grindle
  8. 8. viii Contentsviii Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Companies Are Changing Their Hiring Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 New Job Market: Are You Prepared? . . . . . . . . 3 Chapter 1 Focus and Set Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Career Audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Chapter 2 Preparing for Job Search . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Career Action Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Identify Career Focus and Job Target . . . . . . 8 Create a Job Search Marketing Plan . . . . . . . 9 Making a Career Move . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Chapter 3 Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Create Your Professional Brand . . . . . . . . . . 17 Personal Brand YOU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Online Reputation Management . . . . . . . . . . 21 Chapter 4 Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors . . . . . . . . . 35 What Hiring Managers and Recruiters Look for in Resumes and Cover Letters . . . . 37 C o n t e n t s
  9. 9. WIN Interviews ix The Fundamentals of a Winning Resume . . . . 37 Cover Letters for Different Audiences . . . . . 59 E-Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Chapter 5 Converting Your Documents into Plain Text For Online Uses (Plain Text, Rtf, Pdf) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 How and When to Use Your ASCII/Text Resume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Applicant Tracking Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Chapter 6 Other Marketing Documents: Leadership Addenda, Bios, Visibility LinkedIn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Online Resume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 LinkedIn Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 LinkedIn Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Chapter 7 Your Professional References . . . . . . 106 Reference Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Potential Reference Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Reference Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Online References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 List of Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
  10. 10. WIN Interviews 1 Companies Are Changing Their Hiring Process There has been a slight improvement in the interview and hiring processes of companies over the last decade. There are still the “old believers” whoaskaquestionlike“Tellmeaboutyourself”and think the answer can extract pertinent and useful information for the interviewer. Then along come the “new age” interviewers who want to primarily ask behavioral questions. These examples are at opposite ends of the spectrum, and businesses are realizing that they need to rethink their hiring process to get the right candidates. Here are four ways companies are changing their hiring processes: 1. Quit asking irrelevant “curveball” questions. It has become clear that these types of interview questions do not generate the information necessary to classify the candidate as the right fit for the job. NOTE to job seeker: What this means to you is that companies will be focusing more on interview questions that relate to the position and the skills needed to accomplish the job. Of course, it doesn’t hurt to keep your response to a curveball question in your back pocket just in case. 2. Be clear about what you want. Companies are encouraged to start the process by identifying the key skills and behaviors that a candidate must have to succeed in this position and fit with the company. By knowing these up front, it helps the interviewer to compare apples to apples. NOTE to job seeker: Read the job description that is I n t r o d u c t i o n Companies are sharpening their interviewing and hiring processes; identify how that might affect you. Louise Garver
  11. 11. 2 Introduction provided for the job opportunity carefully as it will contain clues to key skills and behaviors. If this is a position that you found out about through other channels such as networking or an internal employee, ask questions about the company’s expectations of the person they are looking for to fill the position. 3. Proof. The companies need proof that you are who and what you say you are. There cannot be an ounce of doubt for the interviewer. They are looking for the closest fit, and anything that can be disputed could get you disqualified. NOTE to job seeker: You will be tested during the interview to prove that you can do what you represent. They may give you a specific problem to solve. Can you make quick decisions? A sample situation may be thrown your way (and timed) to simulate a situation under pressure. 4. Panel/multiple interviews. More companies believe “two heads are better than one.” By involving more people in the interview and hiring process, they get several perspectives that bring multiple levels of information and details that would not have been possible if the entire process was handled by one person. NOTE to job seeker: You may be seeing more panel interviews that include many levels from several departments that would be affected by the hire. There also may be more interviews in the entire process. Some companies have a policy of a minimum of eight interviews with everyone from the top executives down to the assistant for the new job candidate. They come together after all interviews are conducted to compare notes. So be alerted that companies are sharpening their interviewing and hiring processes, and identify how that might affect you.
  12. 12. WIN Interviews 3 New Job Market: Are You Prepared? As a job seeker, you may have experienced many changes in the job market over the years. Predictions have been formulating for some time now about big changes in careers and the traditional workforce. The experts forecast an exponentialgrowthinthenumberofself-employed, independent service firms, “solopreneurs,” and temporary workers by 2020 with 40 percent or sixty-five million people who will not work in traditional jobs as we know them today. What does this mean for you? You could be affected in two ways: (1) from the employee view of managing this new workforce, and (2) for yourself personally, your flexibility/ability to market yourself as a one-person company if necessary. Let’s look at three key points: 1. Create your personal brand. This concept is sometimes the hardest for job seekers to grasp. They typically don’t think of themselves as a “brand.” It has been proven that people who land the best opportunities are those who understand the value of marketing themselves. The most important marketing message that you can relay to a prospective employer is who you are (your unique value proposition) and what you can do for them (focusing on their issues and needs). 2. Create your niche. It is easier to separate yourself from the masses by clarifying your expertise and showcasing it in your job search documents and interview materials. What we know is that every company has problems. Recruiters and hiring managers are looking for people who are able to solve those problems. Make it easy for the recruiter or hiring manager to see you as the go-to person for X. Are you prepared to answer this question that almost always comes up in an interview? Be sure that you know your brand and your unique value. Your brand should be transparent across all career collateral, both on- and offline. Jill Grindle
  13. 13. 4 Introduction “How are you more qualified to do this job than the other applicants?” 3. Follow industry trends. Up to now, you may have been sustaining an insular approach to your job and focusing only on your company. It’s time to evaluate what’s going on industry-wide, whether you intend to stay in your current industry or move on. Incorporate industry research into your job search activities to find the trends. Joining online groups (LinkedIn is a great source for online forums and groups) and networking will also help you verify the information that is circulating about your industry and trends. This will help you circumvent concerns that may come up about key issues that are stumping your competitors. Social networks are perfect forums to engage with people you might not have otherwise met. Establish connections, learn about the needs of others, and share your expertise as well. Building relationships is still essential in job search. The writing is on the wall: The job market and career opportunities are changing! The facts are clear. Over the last decade, job seekers want a career change because they are dissatisfied with their job/industry, unhappy with their salary, insecure about longevity of job, work in an obsolete industry, or a victim of corporate downsizing. Maybe you are among nearly 50 percent of job seekers rethinking their career path. Recognize that jobs typically last for only two to four years, not a lifetime. Develop an outstanding plan, including strategy and tactics. If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else. —Yogi Berra
  14. 14. Chapter 1: Focus and Set Goals 5 C h a p t e r Career Audit Are you ready for change? When was the last time you took a serious look at your career direction? Where are you now? Where do you want to be? Not sure? As a job seeker, you know that being proactive is a must in this fast-moving world. And many job seekers are just too wrapped up in the day-to-day job activities to take a pulse reading of where they are in their own career. If you answer yes to these statements, you may need a career direction evaluation: 1. Your job lacks challenge and excitement for you. 2. You are feeling unappreciated. 3. Your promotional and/or development oppor- tunities are limited. 4. You are no longer having fun. 5. Learning is replaced with routine. 6. You sense that your skills and talents are being wasted. 7. You are suffering from stress or depression. Individuals often take on the burden of having to know all and be all and lose themselves in that thinking. However, today, senior management is stretched beyond their capabilities at times, Many people think that if they keep their job-search options “open,” they will land a job sooner. Quite the opposite is true: With a target job in mind, you are far more likely to prepare properly - from resume to company research - and land the job of your dreams. Debra O’Reilly Focus and Set Goals 1
  15. 15. 6 WIN Interviews causing one or more of the statements above to be true. How do you get back on track? 1. Start with a career action plan. Yes, you may already have one, but if it is dated or not working for you, it may need some revisions or a fresh approach in a new direction. 2. Assessments or personality inventory may be helpful as tools to help you discover your strengths, preferred way of working, people relations and commonalities, etc. 3. Resume, cover letter, professional bio, LinkedIn profile, references, and other career documents may need to be updated. 4. Work with a career coach who can be extremely helpful in supporting you through this process. Coaches are perfect sounding boards for brainstorming ideas, formulating a strategy, and creating steps to help you implement it. Don’t wait. Get started now!
  16. 16. Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search 7 C h a p t e r Career Action Plan What’s standing in your way? Out of about 6,580 professionals polled globally; 89 percent said they could not accomplish all the tasks on daily to-do lists. That’s huge! What’s amazing is with all the available information (articles, blogs, websites, etc.), helpful tools and technology, only a little over 10 percent of employees end the day having finished their task list. No wonder people in job search mode are challenged trying to fit in their career action plan the mix of everyday duties and responsibilities of work and life. Creating a career action plan and strategy to implement the multiple pieces of that plan is essential. For most job seekers looking at a twenty- four-hour period, there isn’t much time left over after their current job, extended working hours for special projects, family time, continuing professional development, sports/health, and any other activities the person is involved in. So where do you draw the line and make the commitment to job search? 1. What do you really want? (If you get stuck on this one, what would your twin say you really want?) 2. What’s your role in making that happen? 3. What gets in your way? 4. What is your biggest fear around this? 5. What are three steps you can take to achieve your goal? Develop a plan that is multi- faceted, creative, and includes both online and offline networking and resources. Don’t forget how valuable your local librarian(s) can be in the search process. Jill Grindle Your career needs a roadmap. Be sure to establish your goals, create steps to achieve both short- and long-term objectives, and develop metrics to measure your progress. It’s so much easier to find your way to your career goal when your C-GPS (Career-Goal Positioning System) is programmed properly! Debra O’Reilly Preparing for Job Search 2
  17. 17. 8 WIN Interviews These questions generally get a person thinking about what’s most important and what they can put aside temporarily to work towards their job search goal. Sometimes a few more questions are helpful to drill down a little further. 1. What do you really need right now? 2. What kind of support would be helpful? 3. What is your strategy? 4. What is currently motivating you? 5. What are you just tolerating? Thesetypesofquestionsarenotalwayseasy to answer and should be given a reasonable amount of attention to contemplate the answers that support your intentions. Being honest with yourself and your circumstances can sometimes uncover what’s standing in your way of accomplishing what you need to do to work on your career action plan. If you are not ready to make your job search a priority, then what can you do in the interim to move things along? If you are ready to jump into the job search arena with both feet, then understand that there will be roadblocks and challenges at times that will sidetrack your progress. However, recognizing your level of commitment can help you stay motivated. The most focused and dedicated individuals are the most successful. Identify Career Focus and Job Target Thinking about changing industries? Consider the following: 1. Where is your target company in its industry? In the broader marketplace? 2. What business and economic trends are affecting that industry and its markets? 3. If that industry is shrinking, which industries are growing? When you create a job search marketing plan, be sure to include the Six Pillars of Job Search: traditional networking; social networking; direct mail campaign, in which you send an ROI letter to employers; surveying posted jobs on aggregator sites like Indeed.com and niche sites; approaching recruiters; and building your online footprint to attract recruiter searches. Jean Cummings
  18. 18. Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search 9 Create a Job Search Marketing Plan We have all heard the phrase “start with the end in mind.” Well, that is exactly what you can do with your Job Search Marketing Plan. Even before you begin to rewrite your resume, sign up for associations and groups, attend networking events, interact with recruiters, or search online job boards—you must know what type of career is right for you. A clear direction is critical to your success in finding the perfect next job. Step 1: Have a Clear Direction Many people reach a crossroad in their career where they want to considertheiroptions:What’snext? Do I want to stay in manufacturing? Move into high tech ? Or should I consider the biomedical field? So the question becomes what is your ideal career? Have you taken the time to think about it? If not, the time is now. To help you define, try this exercise. Create a spreadsheet or, on a piece of paper, create three columns. Title them Job, Traits, and Skills. Job Traits Skills Fill in the positions you are (or have been) interested in pursuing. Picture a person in this position and what traits make him/her successful. Fill these in this column. Be specific. Is he/she a leader, team player, creative, flexible, self-motivated, independent, etc.? Fill in the skills or qualifications the position requires— the clear requisite skills and education one needs to have. This step may require a bit of research. If you’re not sure of the skills required, look up job descriptions or listings on corporate career centers to find the requirements. The single biggest mistake job seekers make is sidestepping that critical first step of identifying and researching employers or organizations that are a mutual good fit for them. Instead, they dive right into personal branding, and updating or creating their resume. Skipping over this critical first step dooms job seekers when they create a generic resume, trying to cover too many bases that probably won’t hit home with anyone. Meg Guiseppi Job creation is growing fastest in the STEM areas: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. If you’re in the market for new knowledge and training, consider one of these career paths. Debra O’Reilly
  19. 19. 10 WIN Interviews Once you have completed this chart, you can begin to evaluate where you stand in relation to the positions you are considering. Can you pinpoint two or three career paths that match your current talents and skills? Is there a certain career path you’d love to pursue but need additional education or experience for? Use this collected information to define a clear direction for your job search. Step 2: Market Research Market research is an important step in a job search. In order to properly market your product (you) to your audience (employers), you must know who they are, where they are, and how they think. So how do you get this information? The following are questions that will help get you started: Identify people in your desired position. Research their professional and educational backgrounds to determine what made them desirable to be chosen for their current position. Informational interviewing is extremely helpful to gather this information. However, most executives today are too busy to accept casual phone calls from people they don’t know. Can you speak to a friend or colleague who knows that person so you can ask what he likes about his job, what a typical day is like, etc.? Identify target companies. Finding the right companies to target is somewhat essential at this stage of the job search. After all, you will be spending more time at the company during your working career than you will at home, so you want to make sure there is a good match between you and your next employer. A few questions to ask yourself to get started: 1. Who do you know within the company? 2. Who do you know that can introduce you to someone within the company? 3. What is their company culture? Is it one that matches your personality? 4. What challenges are they facing? Do you offer any solutions? 5. What new products or services have they recently released? 6. Has there been new regulation affecting the industry?
  20. 20. Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search 11 Identify where your target industry hangs out. Having the opportunity to connect with people in your target industry is key. You most likely won’t run into these professionals hanging out on the street corner or in a café. So how do you find these people? Join an industry-related LinkedIn group, Ning.com site, forum, etc., where other professionals contribute to conversations and networking. Is there a chapter of your industry association in your area? Is there a meetup group for professionals in your field? Consider all the ways you can branch out to connect. What do you do if you identified a field that you know requires further education? In this case, your next steps could include researching schools and training programs, speaking with alumni, admission offices, etc. Step 3: Marketing Collateral Even if you have the best network, have done due diligence with researching companies and career direction, your job search will be slowed down or severely hindered if you don’t have great marketing collaterals that highlight your talents and skills and support your career achievements. The Must-Haves: 1. Resume – A well-written, concise resume. 2. Cover Letter/e-letter – Customized to highlight why you are perfect for the position. 3. Professional E-mail Address – A simple and professional-mail, i.e., yourname@gmail.com (never use current company e-mail address.) 4. Phone Number – Cell or personal number with a professional- sounding voicemail and no children answering the phone. 5. References Document – This document guides interviewers in asking professional references questions that emphasize your successes. 6. ElevatorPitch–Preparedandrehearsedthirty-second“commercial” about who you are and what you can do for an organization. 7. LinkedIn Profile (and other online profiles) – Updated content with recommendations and key skills that support other collateral materials to help you achieve digital distinction in today’s competitive job market. The Good-to-Haves: 1. Professional Bio – Often requested by recruiters and hiring managers, your bio should reveal your personal brand: your unique
  21. 21. 12 WIN Interviews promise of value, attributes, competitive advantage blended with your successful history. 2. E-Career Portfolio – The results of your professional career come to life with an e-career portfolio that summarizes your achievements, talents, and education. It is an innovative and technology-savvy 3-D presentation of the value of your professional talent. 3. One-Page Networking Resume – A great tool to use in networking conversations, recruiters and employers often seek a one-page snapshot of your background. 4. Networking Cards – Business card–type networking cards with just your personal contact information printed. Never hand out a business card from a previous employer. 5. QR Code – Create a QR code specifically for job search through http://vizibility.com. 6. Twitter Profile – Depending on your industry, building a network on Twitter may get you noticed by the right people. 7. Blog – A blog is a fantastic way to establish yourself and your knowledge of your industry. Just be sure to keep it professional. Make sure you have a consistent look and tone to all materials you are using in your job search. You want to convey a strong brand and message so that a potential employer is never confused about you, your knowledge, and personality. Making a Career Move Superheroes abound on TV today. Each one has a set of arsenals at his fingertips—super strength, X-ray vision, ability to morph into a deadly weapon, the list goes on. Superheroes know intuitively that if they jump so high and so far, they can land on their opponent, surprise attack, and win the battle. They have strategized the right moves at the right time and used the right weapons. Job seekers are really no different—they need their own set of tools and strategies. Even if you have a great resume, it is just one tool in the arsenal. Job seekers are oftentimes thought of as having superpowers or being the superhero of an organization. So you may already possess the talent and skill that is necessary when making a career move. What job strategies do you need to be a superhero in your job search campaign? Network - You may be tired of hearing about networking, as it is constantly being brought up as the most effective job search strategy. Each networking article reports slightly different figures of success, but
  22. 22. Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search 13 all point to a rate of more than 60 percent of jobs being found through networking. Just imagine Spiderman with his web spread across many buildings, enabling him to maneuver in spaces that others don’t have access to. What does that mean to you? Networking can be your web to people and organizations that your competition does not. If you want to boost your chances, you need to be networking! Research - In the old days, when the world was more aligned with the “Clark Kent/Superman” scenario, companies did not expect a candidate to come into an interview fully knowledgeable about the company. Part of the interview process was filling the candidate in on the operations, products, staff, etc. Today, candidates are expected to have done their research and to walk into an interview equipped with information about the organization, the mission statement, products, competition, and executive team. Yes, it takes time; but if you are truly interested in acquiring a position with a potential organization, it is definitely worth your time to present yourself as an informed candidate. Prioritize - Since job search can be equated to a full-time job, a candidate needs to prioritize, especially if he is currently employed. This can be challenging—to put yourself first when you have obligations to your job, family, friends, and various other responsibilities of life. Aquaman comes to mind here; one of his superpowers is that he can breathe underwater. It may seem at times that you are barely keeping your head above water when in the midst of a job search. Making priorities fit your needs is of utmost importance. Schedule dedicated time each week/each day to devote to your job search campaign—whether it is checking online job boards, networking, sending out resumes, or researching companies. Fill the oxygen tank and dive into the depths of organizing your plan and next steps. These are just a few strategies to get you started. Remember that some superheroes have partners to help them accomplish their super feats— such as Batman and Robin or the Fantastic Four. Consider who your partner might be to help you navigate through this career transition. Passion - “Do something you love, and you will never work a day in your life.” —Confucius Do you look at your passion as an asset or hobby? You can turn your passion into a career. Of course you have to be realistic and look at all the factors that contribute to success and failure when changing career focus to a new job. Research the viability of the industry or business you want to transition into. Part of that research could be volunteering on a board of directors to get an inside view of business challenges and successes, or joining associations or social groups to network with others in the industry. You can learn a lot by asking “informational interview” questions in the course
  23. 23. 14 WIN Interviews of conversations. Don’t forget social media, checking company/people profiles on LinkedIn and Facebook. Groups and question sections in these social networking sites also have valuable information for career changers. Money - Many people have grown accustomed to living on a high-salary and bonus structure. They need to take a hard look at what type of money/salary will be available for the first few years in a new position. If moving to a lower-level job in another industry, the salary may be significantly less the first few years. What are you willing to do to make this dream job a reality? Are there others in your family who need to be taken into consideration when making this decision? You may have to downsize your lifestyle in order to live on a smaller salary while the business builds and while you build new skills and develop talents. Are you in a position to live off savings or obtain a loan to manage finances while the business gets off the ground? Will you need to work or consult on the side or find other revenue streams to keep finances afloat? One good resource for compensation analysis is PayScale.com, which analyzed the thirty biggest industries to show how pay changes as you gain experience. Take a look at the industries where you have the best potential to make up for career change. Skills and Talent - How do your current skills and talents translate to the new career? Leverage your strongest skills that transfer across any business or industry. You may need to return to school or pursue certifications to update or build new skills. Take advantage of opportunities your current employer offers for professional development. Updating skills can be expensive if you are footing the entire cost of reeducation. A few examples of job seekers who have taken this next step: Chief financial officer turned hobby of gourmet cooking into new career as chef/restaurateur; cardiovascular surgeon used medical background to become a medical malpractice expert; marketing executive left corporate world to run statewide nonprofit food share program. These tips just tap the surface. Hopefully, they give you a window into some challenges that need to be taken into consideration when contemplating a career change. Today’s hypercompetitive market Time for a career transition? Think first of the similarities between your past work and your intended career. Transferrable skills are one of the links that help convince a potential employer that you will make a positive difference in the new company, industry or job category. Debra O’Reilly
  24. 24. Chapter 2: Preparing for Job Search 15 is looking for job seekers who think out of the box and discover what opportunities might be the next best move. Like any other major life change, reevaluate career options. Don’t go back to the same job for the wrong reason. It is not a life-sustaining move, and often people find themselves unhappy and leave the job quickly. Company Culture - The Internet has made easy work of finding potential candidates through social networking sites like LinkedIn and Facebook. Membership sites have thrived in the last ten years, providing job seekers with job search information and recruiters with a database of well-defined and targeted candidates. And are you aware that most job seekers today are Googled before being contacted for a prescreen or interview? How much time and effort do you put into checking out a prospective company before applying to an organization or considering accepting an offer on a potential position? If you are a manager or executive, you already know that a large percentage of success when hiring new employees is how well they fit into the company culture. But how does a prospective employee learn what he needs to know to determine if he is a good fit with any one organization? 1. If the company is local, drive to their offices and do a little surveillance. Observe the people going to work. Do they appear happy? Are they conversing with fellow employees? What about at the end of the day—is the parking lot still full at 6:00 or 7:00 p.m.? Do you notice people leaving the offices looking worn-out or frustrated? By checking the people coming and going in the morning and leaving work in the evening, you can gain some insights. 2. Teams and teamwork are important points when considering a company culture. How does the organization get things done? Are there several levels of hierarchy to get a decision made? Are teams already in place? And if so, how would you fit with the other team members? Would stepping into a position of leadership create resentment with an existing team? If given an opportunity during the interview stage, request a meeting with the team you would be leading or part of to get a sense of the member dynamics and current functionality. 3. Who do you know who knows the company you are considering as your next employer? Tap into your network and ask questions from people outside the organization to find out what they know. These contacts could be customers or suppliers to the company or even ex-employees. Their experiences will create different perspectives, which can be helpful when looking at the potential company from all sides.
  25. 25. 16 WIN Interviews 4. It goes without saying that checking the company out on Google is helpful as well. You can find if there are outstanding lawsuits, disgruntled reviews from unhappy customers, bankruptcies, bad and good information that can help you evaluate the company. Learning some of these things early in the search can save you time should you determine there is not a good fit. You may have had a dream at one time in your life to work for Disneyland or Coke, and that unfulfilled fantasy may still be lurking in the back of your brain, pushing you towards an organization that may not be a good match for you at this stage in your career. Yet, you continue to want to pursue the company. Be realistic and diligent in your research to make sure the critical factors that are important to you are present in that organization. Of course, no one really knows the full effects of fitting into a company until one actually starts a job, gets grounded, and gets to know the people and processes. Avoid disappointment in a new job by getting as much information as you can to understand the company culture.
  26. 26. Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 17 C h a p t e r So what is your brand? At its core, your brand is your unique promise of value that you give to everyone you meet, work for, and with whom you have any sort of relationship. Kim Schneiderman Deliver your “elevator speech” in a few minutes. The listener—whether a recruiter, hiring manager, or interviewer—will appreciate that you know yourself well enough to articulate it succinctly. Prepare several short branding statements that relay critical information, such as your key skills and a quick rundown of your most recent employment successes. Create Your Professional Brand By Telling Your Story Think of Coca-Cola. Do you have a picture of a can of Coca-Cola clearly in your mind? What do you see? Red and white/silver aluminum can with distinctive lettering. Now picture a glass of Coke, just an ordinary glass with a dark-colored beverage inside. It could be Coke, but it could also be Pepsi; it could even be root beer. If the resume of Coca- Cola just talked about a carbonated soft drink in general terms and didn’t relay the unique taste, the secret formula that creates the taste, the color of the can, and distinctive script that identifies the Coca-Cola brand, the general public would murmur a collective sigh of “‘ho-hum.” There are many carbonated soft drinks on the market today. Why should they try Coca-Cola? Hiring managers might feel the same way about candidates if they are not strategically showcasing their unique talents and skills in the resume. Job Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 3 Because stories are much more memorable than isolated facts, use an overarching storyline to explain your career, and individual stories to communicate your accomplishments. Being memorable is good! Jean Cummings
  27. 27. 18 WIN Interviews seekers need to clearly communicate their professional brand—the impressive things they have done and the unique person they are. A successful resume has everything to do with branding. Understanding a candidate’s personal brand is key to helping one get the job he or she wants because it distinguishes him or her from others. A good branding statement in a resume should include exclusive value, attributes, and competitive advantage blended with a successful work history. How do you create a branding statement? By telling your story in a succinct way that captures your value. Let’s go back to Coca-Cola. Their brand has developed from marketing a single product to multiple products and, as important, the ethics and standards that the business represents. With your brand, companies and hiring managers are buying the standards you have set and consistently delivered. Paint a picture in the mind of the reader with your success stories. Three additional benefits to creating your brand by telling your story: 1. Leverage the information in an interview. These same stories can carry a candidate through some of the most challenging interview questions, because you already have the answers (or a portion thereof) in your back pocket. You have a story to tell that can help you present yourself as a solution to a company’s problem. 2. Social Media Profiles. Candidates can use a professional branding statement as a basis for a social media profile. It should not be exactly the same as in the resume, however, it can be the starting point for the creation of a strong online profile. 3. Professional Bio. The foundation of a professional bio can be seeded from the professional branding statement. In developing your brand, consider answering these questions to help you extrapolate additional key talents that bring value to a potential employer: Management Style: 1. How do you handle coworker conflicts? 2. What goals have you put in place for your team in the past? 3. How do you delegate assignments? 4. How do you evaluate employees? 5. What do you look for in a cohesive team? Individual member value? Define and communicate personal brand around the unique value you offer your target employers – driving strengths, personal attributes, passions, and other good-fit qualities. Meg Guiseppi
  28. 28. Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 19 Leadership Style: 1. How do you motivate others? 2. How do you mentor and train others? Marketing Style: 1. How do you determine marketing strategies? 2. What marketing tools have you developed or used? A good stand-alone brand statement is quite versatile. Creating a professional brand will increase your market value. Personal Brand YOU Developing your brand will help you in all stages of your job search. Do you have a rock solid brand message that clearly and concisely is achieving the results you desire? Or have you just started your career transition and haven’t created a “public face” yet? Either way, the best time to tighten up or create your personal brand is now. 1. What do you have to offer? If you don’t know your strengths, skills, and talents and how to showcase them, how do you expect others to get to know these things about you? Sometimes we are too close to see the whole picture. Career brand strategists can help you extract what you don’t see and leverage your attributes in a compelling manner and get attention. 2. Be your authentic self. Confidence comes from within as we all know. When you are honest with yourself and present yourself to others in an authentic way, you will be showing your courage and confidence about who you are and what you can accomplish. This can do more for you in an interview than you might think. People notice the confidence that shows in your face and body language, without you saying a word. 3. Unique value. What’s unique about you that sets you apart from your competition? The question many hiring managers ask at some point in the interview is, “All things being equal (education, years of experience, etc.), why should I hire you over the other top Tom Peters is still right, after nearly two decades: Brand You rules. Know Thyself, and market your skills in the context of the current market. Be prepared to seek contract and/or part-time jobs, and alter your resume/CV to indicate your employment flexibility. Debbi O’Reilly
  29. 29. 20 WIN Interviews candidates?” Consider the answer to that question as something that should be included in your personal brand statement. 4. Adopt the right mind-set. Be aware of how people do business today and what’s most important for hiring managers to know about you. Even as few as five to ten years ago, personal branding was different from today. Social media has had a huge impact on how job seekers’ online presence affects their personal brand. Candidates are being Google-searched, so LinkedIn profile, Facebook page, and tweets are vital pieces of a personal brand. Watch out for the digital dirt that could exist and ruin your reputation/brand. 5. Focus. With messages becoming shorter and shorter (like 140-character tweets), job seekers need to be able to laser in on their achievements, milestones, and skills in a sound bite. A recent study indicated that the first seventy-five to eighty characters are what people really read. Likewise, a strong brand would include the most significant part of the message up front. These tips should help you create a clear brand message that you can express in verbal or written communications during your job search. Now that you are on your way to creating your brand, putting some of this information into an elevator pitch of thirty to sixty seconds is important. Ultimately, you want to be able to present a message that is clear, targeted, and easy for anyone to understand. There are five key components of an effective self-marketing profile or pitch. Create thirty- and sixty- second sound bites. You can tailor them depending on the situation—networking meeting, answer to the “tell me about yourself” question, etc. 1. Create a professional identity. This point has been covered previously. Incorporate who you are into this brief message, a shortened version of your unique value to a company. 2. Showcase three areas of expertise. Highlight three areas of competency that show your value and differentiate you from the competition. Choose strengths that can easily be coupled with proof of performance of how you have helped organizations make money, save money, save time, maintain the business, or grow the business. Hiring managers look for three things: reasons to hire (personal brand, target skills, and achievement stories); a match to their open job requirements; and your employers, titles, and lengths of tenure, all in only a six-second read. So convey your brand, speak to the job requirements, and use visual elements to emphasize only the key information you want to communicate. Jean Cummings
  30. 30. Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 21 3. Use accomplishment-focused, metrics-driven examples to support your strengths. Just like the resume , the marketing profile must include proof of success. Pair a strength with a specific example to illustrate that you are accomplished at what you do. Quantify accomplishments using numbers, percentages, and dollars whenever possible. 4. Discuss your background as it relates to the target function or industry. Draw on your past experiences from several positions to solidify the scope of your skill set, show career progression, and build the business case for your candidacy. Also include relevant education, if applicable, such as a job-related or advanced academic degree, industry certifications, advanced technological skills, or leadership roles within a professional organization to showcase the diversity of your experiences and to position yourself as a unique contributor. Make the match between your experience and the skills needed for a particular job function or industry. Bring the conversation full circle by relating your qualifications back to the needs of the employer or the needs of a particular industry. By doing so, you prove relevancy and demonstrate why your skills are a good fit for a certain type of position. Online Reputation Management When searching for a job, it’s very common for employers nowadays to look at your online profile. This information isn’t just used to rule out candidates—finding a broad online presence can also improve your chances of getting the job by increasing your “know, like, and trust” factor. What a company finds about you online should reassure them about your qualifications and suitability as a prospective employee, not raise red flags. But it’s the negative information that can hurt your chances of getting the job. A recent survey found that 79 percent of hiring managers in the United States researched candidates online before making a hiring decision. Another survey found that 70 percent of recruiters and hiring managers It is impossible to overestimate the importance of continually building your brand’s online footprint. Tomorrow’s hires may well depend on how much high- value, on-brand, relevant material they find about you online. If you don’t have a solid presence on three-plus social media sites, like LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, you may be dropped from consideration for the job. Jean Cummings
  31. 31. 22 WIN Interviews eliminated candidates after they found negative information about them from online sites like Facebook. More and more companies are reviewing the Facebook profiles of job applicants, either as a first step in the screening process (to narrow down the pool of applicants) or before inviting a candidate to an interview. Prospective employers will make judgments about you based on what they find out about you online. You want to come across as committed, competent, skilled, and of strong character and integrity. You can manage the impression others have about you through your online presence. However, it is essential that your online professional image is also authentic and credible. It is also important to note that if you aren’t managing your personal brand online, it’s still being formed (but without your input). Your online identity is determined not only by what you post, but also by what others post about you—whether a mention in a blog post, a photo tag, or a reply to a public status update. When someone searches for your name on a search engine like Google, the results that appear are a combination of information you’ve posted and information published by others. You can have more control of your online identity by taking a strategic, proactive approach to managing your online presence. What is online about you is more important than ever, and you must be proactive in managing your online presence as it relates to the job search. Assess Your Presence The first step is to see what’s out there already. Monitoring your online presence is easy if you know which tools to use. Many of these are free. Start by Googling yourself. On the Google homepage (http://www. google.com), type in your name. Note: If you have a Google account (i.e., Gmail or YouTube), you will find that you get different results if you are logged in to your Google account when you conduct your search. Log out of Google before conducting your search so you can see what others see when they Google your name. If you have a common name, you will want to see what information is broadly available through a simple name search, but then also narrow it by your profession or geographic location. (For example: “Jane Jobseeker Public Relations” or “Jane Jobseeker Omaha.”) You will want to note how many search results are returned, but you will primarily be looking at the first two to three pages of search results.
  32. 32. Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 23 Google Alerts You should also set up Google Alerts for your name so that you can be alerted when new information is posted online about you. http://www.google.com/alerts Use your name as the search query and determine what information you want searched (Everything, News, Blogs, Video, Discussions, Book), how often you want to receive e-mail alerts, how broad you want the results to be (Everything, Only the best results), and where you want the alerts sent.
  33. 33. 24 WIN Interviews Use quotation marks to make your search more specific. You will get a preview of the search results in a box on the right-hand side of the page, which will help you further refine your search query. For example, using quotation marks results in these sample search results: Removing the quotation marks makes it more likely that you will receive results that are irrelevant. You can modify these alerts at any time, so start with broad results and you can refine them over time. Me on the Web Me on the Web is Google’s way of helping people manage their online brands. Using Me on the Web, you can create a profile to put your best foot forward, set up alerts to help you figure out when people are talking about you, and attempt to remove negative items related to your online presence.
  34. 34. Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 25 Access Google’s Me on the Web here: https://www.google.com/dashboard/b/0/ You will need to sign in to your Google account (or create one) to access the tools. Google recommends keeping your profile updated so people who are searching for you will be able to find precisely the information you want them to find. To change your profile, click “Edit profile” in your dashboard. Then just click an area to edit your profile. One of the main features of Me on the Web is the ability to alert you when something changes with the results that come up when you search your name. Click “Set up search alerts for your data” under Me on the Web in your Google Dashboard to create your alerts.
  35. 35. 26 WIN Interviews A new screen will pop up where you can choose what you want to be alerted for. Typically, Google will alert you whenever the results for your name or e-mail address change. You can also set up custom alerts. For your job search, you can set up alerts whenever a company you want to work for is mentioned. Just click “Add alert” and add in as many custom alerts as you want. Me on the Web helps inform you when you’re mentioned online with Google Alerts and helps you choose what information is displayed to the public with Google Profile. Twitter Monitoring You can also set up an application called IFTTT (If This Then That) to send you an e-mail whenever you are mentioned on Twitter. Sign up for a free account at http://ifttt.com/ and use recipe number 19739 (http://ifttt.com/recipes/19739). Replace “MyCompany” with your name, and you will receive instant e-mail notifications every time someone mentions your name on Twitter. You can also use a free service like TOPSY to create alerts and monitor your online presence.
  36. 36. Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 27 You can also subscribe to online services to monitor and manage your online reputation. Reputation.com You can sign up for a free reputation snapshot. You will likely see some of the same results as you’ve found through your earlier search efforts. Reputation.com also offers additional (paid) services to help you monitor and manage your online presence. For as little as $9.95/month, the company’s MyReputation Discovery will search the “Deep Web” for information about you: http://www.reputation.com/myreputationdiscovery You can also measure your social influence using a site like Klout.com (http://klout.com/home). KLOUT creates a Klout Score that measures your online influence (on a scale of 1 to 100). Scrubbing Your Digital Dirt Negative information about you online is referred to as “digital dirt.” Like its physical counterpart, it can be messy and difficult to get rid of. However, one effective strategy for managing your online reputation is to “bury” your digital dirt.
  37. 37. 28 WIN Interviews Although your Google search results may have returned thousands (or hundreds of thousands) of results, it’s what is in the first three to five pages of results that is most important. There are two steps to managing your online presence: (1) removal and/ or correction of incorrect or inappropriate information, and (2) posting new content that will move the unfavorable information lower in your search results. One of the strongest ways to create positive online content is through social media. Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn often appear prominently in Google search results. Your Facebook Profile Facebook is increasingly being used by job seekers—and employers— in the job search. More than eighteen million Americans credit Facebook as the source of how they found their current job. A 2011 Jobvite study found that 84 percent of job seekers had profiles on Facebook. Having a Facebook account will also give you access to Facebook- related applications (apps), such as BeKnown, Glassdoor, and BranchOut, which use your Facebook network to help you connect to job opportunities. These tools allow you to leverage your network for you to find job openings and insider connections into the companies you want to work for. It is very important to check out your privacy settings on Facebook. Restricting the information you show to the public is important—but don’t just set it and forget it. Facebook occasionally updates its privacy settings, so you should review your settings regularly. Learn more about Facebook privacy settings here: http://www.facebook.com/settings/?tab=privacy
  38. 38. Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 29 Another key setting is Past Post Visibility. When you click on the “Manage Past Post Visibility” link, it will open a new box asking you to confirm that you want to change all of your past status updates to “Friends Only” visibility. If you click “Limit Old Posts,” it will automatically reset all your previous posts to a more private setting. If you choose not to change the visibility of all your old posts, you can change the visibility of individual posts by clicking on each post. (This can be quite time-consuming if you have a lot of posts.)
  39. 39. 30 WIN Interviews Another important step is to see how the public views your profile. You can check this with Facebook’s “View As . . .” option under “Edit Profile.” http://www.facebook.com/editprofile.php Finally, be aware that when you comment on other people’s posts, the information may be more public than you were aware. Be sure to post content related to your profession or career on your Facebook page—and make those posts public. Share content you find in industry publications, traditional media, and blogs. Comment thoughtfully on the content. Post inspirational quotes from business leaders and relevant facts, figures, and infographics. Keep in mind, however, the “golden rule” in posting any information online: If you don’t want your mom (or grandmother or sister) to see it, don’t post it. Anyone who has access to your private profile can take a screenshot and post it publicly. In addition, some employers are asking for access to Facebook accounts. They ask the job seeker to log in to his account and then peek over his shoulder as he scrolls through the account. In this instance, if you change post settings to “Only Me,” those will still be visible if you are logged in to your account, and the hiring manager will be able to see them on your page. You are better off deleting controversial content—or not posting it in the first place. As the old saying goes, “Sometimes the best offense is a best defense.” Requesting Removal of Online Information If you find information online that you don’t want to be public, first, determine who controls the content. For example, if the photo you want to hide is on your Facebook profile, you can change the visibility settings
  40. 40. Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 31 of that photo. If, however, the unwanted content resides on a website or page you don’t control, you can request that it be removed. Note: Google won’t remove the content for you. Google’s company policy is that they will not change search results to cater to individual people. (If, however, the site in question is publishing your confidential personal information, Google will intervene. This includes your social security or government ID number, bank account or credit card number, an image of your handwritten signature, or your name if it is associated with a porn site.) To get an item removed, you need to first contact the website’s owner to get them to change it. You want the information removed at the source because if it isn’t removed from the original website, people will still be able to see it, even if it doesn’t appear in Google’s search results. And remember, removing content from Google’s search results doesn’t remove it from other search engines (e.g., Bing, Yahoo). After the webmaster has made the change, the negative result will still show up in Google for some time until Google updates their index. Note: If the content has not been removed from the website, the content will reappear in Google’s search results when that site is indexed again in the future. If you’ve removed a negative item and need Google’s index to reflect that immediately, you can go through Google’s removal procedures to have that item taken out of the index. Here’s how. Start by going to the removal request page: http://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/removals Click “New removal request.” Enter the URL you want removed.
  41. 41. 32 WIN Interviews Finally, select the reason you want it removed and hit the “Request” button. Make sure you choose the right reason for your situation. Populating Your Online Presence You can distinguish yourself online by using your middle name or middle initial online (and then be sure to use the same name on your career marketing documents). Own Your Name (Vanity URL) One of the best things you can do is register your name as a domain name, also known as a vanity URL. You should also claim your name on social media accounts. Social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn offer vanity URLs, where your username is in the URL. You can then create a simple website or blog, which provides links to all of your online accounts—especially the ones you want to direct a prospective employer to review. If you use your real name as your handle on social network sites, you will rank higher in Google search results. Claim Your Profile (Or Remove Your Profile) There are numerous “people search” sites that take publicly available information and aggregate it online. You have two choices with these sites—beat ’em or join ’em. You can either ask to have your information removed from the site, or you can claim your profile and create an account (usually free) to ensure the information listed is accurate. Here are some of the most popular free “people search” sites: http://www.spokeo.com/ http://www.whitepages.com/ http://www.411.com/ http://www.intelius.com/ http://www.mylife.com/ http://www.phonebook.com/ http://www.peoplesmart.com/ http://www.addresses.com/ http://www.emailfinder.com/ http://www.freephonetracer.com/ http://www.phonedetective.com/ http://www.archives.com/
  42. 42. Chapter 3: Define Professional Brand and Value to Employers 33 “People search” sites make money by selling your personal information online, which means they don’t like to remove that information. You can often find instructions for submitting your request for removal on the website (sometimes it’s hidden under “Privacy” or “Terms of Service” at the bottom of the website), but they may make you jump through hoops to do so, requiring you to fax a request or send a copy of your identification. Requesting removal once also won’t guarantee that the information won’t reappear in the future. Because many of these companies acquire their data from a variety of public sources, it’s likely that your name will reappear when they re-index their database. Other Ways to Create Content Postings on blogs and news sites often appear in search results. Writing constructive comments can be a good way to create new content for Google to associate with your name. An extremely powerful way to create new content for your Google search results is by blogging. A personal or business blog—if you are committed to it—can provide a solid online presence. If you don’t like to write, you can shoot videos and publish it on your blog. Posting content on these sites will also show up prominently in search results: • YouTube • Twitter • LinkedIn • Flickr • Google+ • About.me • bigsight Reviews you post on Amazon.com will also show up in your Google search results. Also, while we’re at it, ensure that your LinkedIn profile aligns with your resume. Many recruiting managers and hiring managers compare the two.
  43. 43. 34 WIN Interviews Reputation Management is Not a One-Time Thing Social recruiting isn’t going away. A 2011 Jobvite Social Recruiting Survey found that 89 percent of employers surveyed said they would recruit using social media in 2012, and nearly 55 percent of those surveyed said they are increasing their budgets for social recruiting. With the increasing emphasis on social recruiting, online reputation management is even more critical. Some of the steps involved in online reputation management can be done quickly, but the Internet has a long memory, so be aware that it will take time for your new content to begin replacing old content, and even more time for your old information to disappear from your search results. Most important, the need for ongoing online reputation management is vital. Continue to monitor your online presence, even when you’re not in active job search mode.
  44. 44. Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors 35 C h a p t e r What Hiring Managers and Recruiters Look for in Resumes and Cover Letters There has also been a lot of spin about how long or short a resume should be. From my perspective as a recruiter, a resume should be as long as necessary. For example, a candidate with five years of experience should not require a three- page resume. Or a candidate with eighteen years of experience should not be reduced to a one- page resume. Length of resume depends entirely on each individual situation. There is no formula or rule etched in stone. If a recruiter is working with a PhD candidate, then a resume may be three, four, or five pages or even longer. So be it. If it’s relevant, promote it. If you’re pontificating, don’t. —Tim Dermady, President, ExecutiveFit Recruitment If you’ve been fretting over age-old questions such as resume length and other issues related to what hiring professionals actually look for in resumes and cover letters, then wonder no more. A survey of more than 2,500 randomly selected members of the Society for Human Resource Management as well as Fortune 500 companies known for favorable work environments responded to pertinent questions that affect job seekers. These companies represented a cross section of diverse industries and ranged from fewer than Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors 4
  45. 45. 36 WIN Interviews one hundred employees (29%) to more than five thousand employees (4%) in the following categories: business and professional services (23%); manufacturing (20%); finance, insurance, and real estate (13%); nonprofit (9%); and health services (6%). Below are responses that will help you shape more effective resumes and letters. How long should a resume be? One page . . . 20% Two pages . . . 30% Depends on the level of the position . . . 60% No preference . . . 0% Which resume format or style do you prefer? Traditional (reverse chronological) . . . 40% Functional (skills based) . . . 10% Some combination of the above . . . 50% No preference . . . 0% How do you prefer to receive resumes? By mail . . . 10% By attachment as a Microsoft Word document to an e-mail . . . 60% By text in the body of an e-mail . . . 20% By fax . . . 10% No preference . . . 20% Do you want a cover letter? Not necessarily . . . 20% Personalized cover letters only . . . 60% Form letters are acceptable . . . 20% No preference . . .10% Howmanyyearsofrelatedbackgroundwouldyouliketoseeinaresume? Zero to five years . . . 30% Six to ten years . . . 40% Eleven to twenty years . . . 10% More than twenty years . . . 20% Should applicants explain gaps in employment or job-hopping? Valid explanations of employment gaps or job-hopping are welcome . . . 74% Don’t trust explanations of employment gaps . . . 22% Unsure . . . 4% What single item is most valuable in a resume? Verifiable accomplishments . . . 88% There is no single item that is most valuable . . . 12% Does proofing and format count? Managers who remove an application if they find typos or grammatical errors . . . 76% Managers who prefer reverse chronological resumes . . . 75% Managers who prefer white or off-white¬–colored paper . . . 83%
  46. 46. Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors 37 How long does your organization keep resumes on file? Zero to one month . . . 0% One to three months . . . 0% Three to six months . . . 30% More than six months . . . 70% Does your organization use a scanning or database system to manage resumes? Yes . . . 50% No . . . 50% What do you wish job seekers to do that they do not seem to be doing now? Typical comments included: “Send a cover letter telling me what they really want to do and follow up. Call me if they take another position and are no longer available.” “I would like them all to be really definite about what they do and don’t want to do in their job/career. Don’t be wishy-washy! New grads are the worst offenders in this respect. If you want to start at the bottom and eventually work your way up in sales, marketing, finance, IT, or any field, say so!” “Research the company—know something about a company’s type of business.” “Send detailed resumes, with dates and current information.” The Fundamentals of a Winning Resume The right resume is the catalyst for a successful job search, one that culminates in ultimate career satisfaction. It should showcase your talents and skills and translate your qualifications into marketable resume content. Your resume is not working for you if you are not getting called for interviews about great job opportunities that match your career goals. A good resume is not an option; you have too much riding on its success to grab the reader’s attention. Design and Format The design and format of your resume needs to convey a professional look and feel. Good design does more than create a pretty page; it creates a positive first impression (before anyone reads one word), guides readers through the document, and draws attention to the most important information. The font should be a reasonable size, never smaller than 10 point or larger than 12 point in the general text. Variation in type size (e.g., larger font point for headings) is okay, and other variations are helpful to emphasize Resumes, LinkedIn profiles, and other career communications provide the information executive recruiters and hiring decision makers need to qualify candidates. Meg Guiseppi
  47. 47. 38 WIN Interviews points for the quick skim resumes receive. Boldface type emphasizes titles and key strengths. There should be plenty of white space between bulleted statements and sections. Styles There are three types of resume styles commonly used. The overall tone and style need to match your personality, your industry, and your culture. Chronological/Traditional – Traditional-style resumes have been around a long time. Typically, this style of resume starts with Contact Information, then Experience, Education, and miscellaneous other sections such as Honors and Awards, Publications, Associations, Community Activities, etc. In the Experience section, the listings are presented in reverse chronological order and show company, position title, dates worked, a summary of responsibilities, and then a bulleted area that highlights accomplishments.   Name 555.555.5555 E-mail: client@comcast.net 555 Washington Avenue City, State zip code Regional Sales Manager Delivering consistent and sustainable revenue gains, profit growth and market-share increases through strategic sales regional leadership. Valued offered: Driver of innovative programs that provide a competitive edge and establish company as a full-service market leader. Proactive, creative problem solver who develops solutions that save time, cut costs and ensure consistent product quality. Empowering leader who recruits, develops, coaches, motivates and inspires sales teams to top performance. Innovative in developing and implementing win-win solutions to maximize account expansion, retention and satisfaction. Selected Career Achievements COMPANY City, State 2000 to 2010 Regional Manager Impact: Reinvigorated the regional sales organization, growing sales from $18.5M to $45M, doubling account base to 482 and increasing market share 15%. Built, coached and managed sales team of 10 recognized as the top-performing team nationwide. Established new performance benchmark and trained sales force on implementing sales-building customer inventory rationalization programs. Revitalized and restored profitability of 2 underperforming territories by coaching and developing territory reps. Penetrated 2 new markets and secured a lucrative market niche in abrasive products. Staffed, opened and managed the 2 branch locations in New Jersey—one of which alone produced $12M+ over 3 years. Initiated and advanced the skills of sales force to effectively promote and sell increasingly technical product lines in response to changing market demands. Increased profit margins and dollar volume through product mix diversification and expansion. Created product catalogs and marketing literature. Ensured that the company maintained its competitive edge in the marketplace by initiating value-add programs to meet customer needs. Led highly profitable product introduction with a 40% profit margin that produced $100K annually in new business. COMPANY City, State 1990 to 2000 Sales Manager Impact: Turned around stagnant sales territory and customer perception by cultivating exceptional relationships through solutions-based selling and delivering value-added service. Recognized as a peak performer company-wide who consistently ranked #1 in sales and #1 in profits. Positioned and established company as a full-service supplier to drive sales revenues by translating customer needs to product solutions. More than doubled territory sales from $700K to $11.5M during tenure and grew account base from 80 to 125 through new market penetration. Landed and managed 3 of company’s 6 largest accounts and grew remaining 3. Captured a lucrative account and drove annual sales from $100K in the first year to $5M in 3 years—outperforming the competition without any price-cutting. Mentored new and existing territory reps on customer relationship management, solutions-selling strategies, advanced product knowledge and customer programs. Education B.S. in Business Management—University, City, State
  48. 48. Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors 39 Functional – This style of resume showcases accomplishments and qualifications differently than a traditional resume. This type of resume is best used for career changers, consultants, and interim executives. We would not recommend using this style of resume for a traditional job search as, generally, recruiters don’t like this style of resume as well as the traditional and multinational styles. JAMES LANG Office (616) 782-3363 | LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jameslang | Email: james.lang@gmail.com Consultant Interim Executive Operations / Finance / Risk / Change Leadership Change leader known for integrity/honesty and right hand/advisor to senior management. Qualified by operations, finance, risk management, and human capital/team dynamics expertise developed over 25 years, particularly in the alternative asset class. Vast international business experience working in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Expertise Turnkey operations and financial leadership that saves time and money for startups. Provide cost-efficient administrative, operational and financial services, enabling management to focus on product and market development. Guide succession planning as well as sourcing and vetting of high caliber executive candidates as the enterprise grows. Deep-dive, on-site operational reviews on behalf of institutional investors and fund managers. Orchestrate uncommonly thorough due diligence of all risk, operations and human capital areas with recommendations for improvement and reinvestment. Diagnose and implement solutions to issues that would prevent further funding for growing companies and alternative asset management funds. Wind-down management. Enable PE and VC firms to discharge their responsibilities to limited partners while maintaining optimal cash flow throughout the wind-down and liquidation process by consolidating and outsourcing mid- and back-office services, ensuring seamless and transparent support while substantially reducing costs. Representative Results  Architected and implemented operations for an international VC fund. Successful in creating a lean global investment framework on 5 continents on an aggressive timeline.  Established scale-able operations and finance infrastructure/systems that supported unfettered growth for an early stage, VC- backed energy startup. Crafted grant proposals that won 38% of total funding for the company.  Turned around a struggling eCommerce start up, rebuilt senior management team, and negotiated cash sale of company in the midst of dotcom crash.  Turned around a graduate school from near financial demise to $2.9M operating surplus in 15 months.  Kept share price of an investment banking firm from falling dangerously, retaining buy-hold recommendations from analysts during a financial and PR crisis. Career Track Chief Operating Partner * GMA Capital (well-established VC fund manager), Seattle, WA 2005-2013 COO / CFO * Manning Company (global financial services firm), Seattle, WA 2002-2006 CFO / Investing Partner * Western Financial (VC Fund), Bellevue, WA 2000-2002 CFO * Sanford Media, Inc. * (VC-backed internet startup), Bellevue, WA 1999-2000 EVP / CFO * Washington Power Corp (VC-backed energy startup), Seattle, WA 1997-1999 Turnaround Consultant * Washington Institute of Integral Studies (university), Seattle, WA 1996-1997 Vice President * Bankers Fund, New York, NY 1989-1996 Assistant Vive President * Charles Schwab, New York, NY 1987-1989 Manager * Deloitte Touche, Dallas, TX; Dublin, IRE; New York, NY 1982-1987 Education Graduate Studies, Finance and Business Administration – Notre Dame, North Bend, IN 1995-1996 Bachelor of Business Administration, Accounting Finance – Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 1981 Leveraging successful background in C-level management, banking, and “Big 4” consulting to: Develop and execute strategy … Originate fresh ideas and novel solutions grounded in practicality… Pinpoint and eliminate barriers to success and funding … Prevent wasted time and money … Expertly navigate crises For startup, turnaround, and established VC and PE-backed companies, alternative fund managers and instructional investors.
  49. 49. 40 WIN Interviews Combination/Multinational – This style combines some of the features of a chronological and functional resume. The summary, or profile area, is prominent and captures the reader’s attention in the first ten seconds with career highlights. If you will be competing with other job seekers who are using this more assertive multinational style, you may want to use this style. JOHN JONES 565 Spicer Street (555) 503-9768 Austin, TX 78750 jjones@gmail.com CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER • CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER Change agent driving unprecedented industry-leading revenue and market share results for technology products and services in the U.S. and internationally through astute PL management, incisive problem solving, innovative marketing and product development, and adept people/team leadership. Career history of revitalizing failing business units, resolving critical business challenges, and delivering breakthrough results in executive marketing, sales and divisional roles for a $2 billion global technology leader. Built and lead a highly respected, 120-member team that innovated several industry firsts frequently adopted by competitors. Consummate leader and coach known for finding and developing exceptional talent and creating motivating work environments where people grow and thrive. Top-rated in company for succession planning – hired and mentored 8 of the organization's top 10 performers. Persuasive negotiator who secured benchmark partnership agreements with industry leaders such as Apple, Inc., Google and Cisco Systems. Core Strengths:  Strategic Planning Execution  PL Performance Improvement  Global Brand Marketing Management  Sales Marketing Management  Talent Acquisition, Development Management  Strategic Product Development  Corporate Restructuring Reengineering  International Distributor Development  Vendor Agency Management CAREER ACHIEVEMENTS AUSTIN TECH SYSTEMS, Austin, TX – 1996 to Present Global leader in the manufacture of sophisticated printing technology and delivery of digital and service solutions for the Print Media industry. Headquartered in Germany with production and development sites in 7 countries and 275 sales and service units in 150+ countries; 18,000 employees; $2.5 billion/year in revenues.  Snapshot: Promoted rapidly to senior marketing executive for the U.S. headquarters and a $550 million division of products, services and consumables. Distinguished record of delivering pivotal business-building results while leading organization through successful restructurings, acquisitions, divisional start-ups and growth strategies. Hold multiple concurrent roles: CME, SVP-Product Management, SVP-Consumable Sales. SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT / CHIEF MARKETING EXECUTIVE (2007 to Present) SCOPE: Executive Board member since 2004. Direct global marketing (advertising, creative services, PR, CRM, e-commerce, social media, events, internal communications) and product lifecycle management (PL for 8 product lines, 400 products). Lead 125-person team through 5 VPs, 10 directors, 5 sales managers and 8 department managers in U.S., Canada and Mexico. Negotiate agreements and manage vendor/agency relations with Evans Group Americas, and other strategic partners. IMPACT: Returned company to market dominance after recessions in 2004 and 2010 and built a marketing and product management organization recognized as the preeminent industry leader. SIGNATURE RESULTS:  Reorganized field sales and service organization and North America headquarters. Delivered $55 million in cost savings and improved morale despite 30% headcount reduction. Market share exceeded 50%.  Outperformed all competitors in social media results, including integrated online/print with QR-code advertising programs, YouTube channels, Facebook subscribers, SEO, Twitter accounts and followers.  Invented the “Magalog,” a combination magazine and product catalog which effectively decreased direct mail expenditures 85% while increasing participation levels to over 35,000 subscribers.  Delivered 35% reduction in overall advertising, marketing and trade show event costs without negative impact and reduced expenditures by more than $12 million. New PR strategy yielded annual audience reach/impressions of 33 million, 500+ articles, and the industry’s highest favorability rating at 66%+.  Led team that set the industry standard for ROI tools utilization to create quantifiable success metrics for advertising, PR, event-based programs, and internet search and advertising activities.
  50. 50. Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors 41 JOHN JONES  Page 2 SENIOR V.P., PRODUCT MANAGEMENT (2009 to Present) SCOPE: PL and strategic leadership for the industry’s largest and most successful product portfolios consisting of hardware, software and consumables with 35% to over 67% market share. Oversee the industry’s largest Customer Experience Center (NAPPTC), a 55,000 sq. ft. facility offering 2,500 customer demos per year, as well as product training and testing, where success ratio of demo-to-close exceeds 73%. IMPACT: Restructured the product management organization, driving tactics and partnerships that solidified company's reputation as the technology-dominant market leader in hardware, software consumables and services. Launched 28 hardware, software and service products; opened industry’s largest demonstration facility. RESULTS: Reduced time-to-market of new product launches 32%+. Six products received the InterTECH Technology Award, the industry's most prestigious honor for major industry impact. Led team to create the industry’s largest and most successful customer events – Packaging Event, PMDC Launch Event, and historic launches of the XYM and CMC products. SENIOR V.P. – CONSUMABLE SALES / DIVISION MANAGER (2002 to Present) SCOPE: Pioneered Consumables business line from inception to a $45 million per year division. Created sales organization, opened a national call-center, developed an online store, and implemented a nationwide logistics/delivery network. Managed PL, overall operations, product development and testing, logistics and vendor relationships for the highly profitable division. IMPACT: Strategically grew consumables/supplies revenue and margins making Austin Tech Systems more than just an equipment supplier for the first time in its history. RESULTS: Web Store performance surpassed $165 million in sales, 125,000 orders, and over 48,000 customers. National Call Center has generated over $165 million in product, accessories and service sales since 2004. SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING (2005 to 2007) VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING (2002 to 2005) Completely reorganized a fragmented Marketing department, renegotiated long-term vendor agreements, developed an in- house Creative Services department, and established formal budgets and procedures. IMPACT: Elevated company's image, brand reputation and recognition as the industry's leading solution supplier while improving marketing cost structure and efficiency. RESULTS: Reduced staff 37% while improving efficiency 77% to deliver $15 million savings over 5 years. Trade Show department managed 75+ events annually with budgets ranging from $1.5 million to $24 million, including the single largest trade show booth ever constructed in the US. In-house Creative Services department saved over $1.65 million per year. CORPORATE VICE PRESIDENT DIRECT MARKETING SALES (1999 to 2002) IMPACT: Established both a National Development Sales Organization and company's first direct marketing call center. Designed a complete sales training program and recruited 16 sales reps and 5 sales managers. RESULTS: Successfully placed 100% of first recruitment class into field sales positions. Call center generated over 3,200 leads annually resulting in $50 million in equipment sales. DIVISIONAL V.P. INTERNATIONAL SALES, PRODUCT MANAGEMENT – PUBLISHING SERVICES (1996 to 1999) IMPACT: Redesigned U.S. sales, technical support and marketing organization into an efficient global sales and distribution company. Opened 190 distributors in 90+ countries. Negotiated 3 strategic vendor relationships and led vital patent rights purchase. RESULTS: International sales grew from $7 million to $15 million in 3 years making company the global leader in its space. New software sales increased 53%+ in 2 years. Decreased time-to-market 40% to fewer than 16 months. PRIOR (1991 to 1996): Progressive sales and marketing experience with Johnson Linotype (acquired by Austin Tech). EDUCATION Bachelor of Arts, Political Science, International Law  University of Texas at Austin Business Administration and Marketing  Georgetown University International Executive Development Program  Austin Tech Board member of numerous leading industry associations and frequent invited speaker (see addendum)
  51. 51. 42 WIN Interviews JOHN JONES  Page 3 RESUME ADDENDUM Industry Leadership / Board Memberships: Chair, Board of Directors: Smith University Majors Institute of Packaging Graphic Design (2010–Present) Advisory Board Member: Cal Poly University (2006–Present) Chair, Supplier Advisory Board: Printing Industries of America (2009–Present) Executive Board Member: Printing Industries of America (2008–Present) Executive Board Member: Association for Suppliers of Printing, Publishing and Converting Technologies (2006–Present) Treasurer: Association for Suppliers of Printing, Publishing and Converting Technologies (2008–2009) Board Member/Treasurer: Graphic Arts Show Company (2008–2009) Board Member: Association for Suppliers of Printing, Publishing and Converting Technologies (2005–2006) Presentations: Keynote: The Call, Click, Print -- Marketing Concepts – International Print Week – San Jose University (2010, 2011) Guest Lecturer: Integrated Marketing Strategies –MBA School of Business, University of Austin (2010) Guest Lecturer: International Brand Management – MBA School of Business, Stanislaw University (2008, 2009) Keynote: The Business of Marketing to Millennials – Mexico Bureau of International Tourism and Trade (2008) Keynote Panel: Value of Print in the New Marketing Mix – Chicago Print Production Association (2005) Executive Instructor: Executive Time Management - Franklin Covey (1996 – 2009) Awards: Clemson University Award – Corporate Appreciation Award (2011) Printing Industries of America’s – InterTECH Technology Award (2010) Clemson University Award – Corporate Appreciation Award (2009) Induction into the Soderstrom Society (2009) Printing Industries of America’s – InterTECH Technology Award (2009) Printing Industries of America’s – InterTECH Technology Award (2008) Printing Industries of America’s – InterTECH Technology Award (2007) Printing Industries of America’s – InterTECH Technology Award (2005) PREMIER Print Award – “ Speedmaster Book” (2006) PREMIER Print Award – “ Passion For Print” (2005) Printing Industries of America’s – InterTECH Technology Award (2005) CINE Golden Eagle – “Extraordinary Performance in Video and Filmmaking” (2004) TELLY Award – “Premier Performance in Video and Filmmaking” (2003) Resume Sections Profile/Summary – Consider a headline that tells readers instantly who you are. For instance: “VICE PRESIDENT: Sales and Marketing.” The summary should clearly communicate who you are and what you have accomplished in your career. It helps to clearly set you in the mindofthereadersothattheyarethinking of you in that context as they read the rest of the resume. This area is a good place to showcase the keywords that relate to The profile section is a valuable tool for you. It helps you tell a perspective employer exactly who you are professionally and how you fit into their organization. When you have a strong profile section on your resume, an employer can immediately start to visualize you working for the company. Kim Schneiderman
  52. 52. Chapter 4: Career Marketing Documents: The Tools That Open Doors 43 your expertise and industry. Languages, degrees, or certifications may be mentioned here as well. Details should remain in appropriate sections. Experience – Highlight the last twelve to fifteen years in the Experience area of the resume. Whenever possible, include “context” information to help readers understand your value. A rich context lets readers better understand and absorb what you did. • What was going on at each company when you took the job? • Why were you hired or promoted? •  What goals were you given? •  What challenges did you face? •  What obstacles did you encounter? After a brief summary of job scope and duties, a bulleted section should follow that highlights your achievements. Do not mingle job scope/duties with accomplishments. This is confusing to the reader and diminishes the impact of your accomplishments. These bullets are the most important part of the resume because they contain your specific and unique achievements. The content in a bullet should show result, action, and challenge if possible. Front loading the bullet with the result will help the reader grab the essence of the bullet at a glance. How you achieved the result is important as well and can be stated after the result because, ultimately, the reader will want to know how you did it. Of course, the challenge is a contributing factor to the whole picture because, in itself, the challenge can be overwhelming circumstances that give more weight to the results. Education This section should include your college degrees, certifications, licenses, or anything that contributes to your ongoing professional development. Additional Sections Professional and Community Activities – List your roles in leadership, on committees, or general contributions to the organizations. Honors and Awards – List professional recognitions you received that include honors, awards, and recognitions. A few of these can be highlighted in the career profile area and details stated in this section. Technology Qualifications – In most resumes today, a brief listing of technology expertise is listed in the career profile; however, if your industry is technology, there may need to be a lengthier section to list additional technology knowledge. If possible, visually separate and emphasize one overarching contribution you’ve made to your organization for each job. That way, recruiters can see at a glance the standout value you bring to the table. Jean Cummings

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