BP304 Become a Social Business:                    Leverage User Adoption Through Gamification                    Sasja Be...
Agenda       About me                                             What motivates us?       What is gamification ?      ...
About me    e-office 1970             sasja.beerendonk@e-office.com    history teacher           twitter.com/sbeerendonk...
What do you think of at the word gamification? Gamification is the use of game elements and game design techniques  (mech...
Gamification is everywhere In consumer areas
Greener energy Utilities company Nissan Leaf6
And also business-like LinkedIn7
Gartner Research•   By 2014, more than 70% of Global 2000 organizations will have at least one    gamified application•   ...
Statistics and research      how many of you are   is playing games a           gamers?            waste of time?      wha...
2012 gaming research                                                   33,6 million gamers                              55...
2012 gaming research                                                  157 million gamers                             271.0...
What do you see?           urgency        ‘anxiety’      concentration                     optimism         surprise12   P...
Time spent gaming                                                              training                                   ...
How does gamification leverage user-adoption ?              The way                                   The way        The w...
Make social collaboration possible       knowledge | information | everywhere         process | control | predictable     ...
Yellow & Blue16
What motivates us ? from Maslow’s Need to Pink’s Drive17   Source: Michael Wu, Ph.D.
Changing behavior - Fogg’s Behavior Model (FBM)                                                                  trigger  ...
Encourage to engage in desired behavior19   Source: Vancouver Island Assistance Dogs on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/wa...
Clicker training – Teaching a chain of actions Small steps                                                               ...
How does gamification leverage user-adoption ?              The way                                   The way        The w...
How does gamification work ?     measure         Set goals, levels, points and measure if they are met.      reward       ...
Encourage users to engage in desired behavior        game mechanics       behaviour motivators        points              ...
Drive engagement with game design techniques      rapid/instant feedback     clear goals and rules                        ...
Some roadblocks to change Fear of the unknown Comfort with the status quo Pushback on being forced to change           ...
How then? Profile progress     – Photo     – About me     – Tags     – Network     – Tag others     – Status updates26
27
28
expert                advanced     beginner29
Sticks and carrots: path to sustained adoption                                                                            ...
About motivation and rewards                           extrinsic rewards                                                  ...
Behaviour loop                        desire                      incentive                      challenge                ...
Is gamification a long-term approach?            gamification                                        extrinsic rewards    ...
Gamification in social software Badgeville for Yammer + Jive + IBM Connections ® Bunchball Level Up for IBM Connections ...
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IBM partner     On-premise environment     Focused on first steps and long-term     Integration with other tools     Custo...
Q&A Questions ?                                                Need more? Get the whitepaper                            ...
Legal disclaimer     © IBM Corporation 2013. All Rights Reserved.     The information contained in this publication is pro...
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BP304 Become a social business: leverage user-adoption through gamification

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User adoption is key to success when implementing social software within your organization. When confronted with social software, employees often find themselves clueless about how to get started, because it requires a different work manner, behavior and attitude. Step-by-step gamification guides employees into the right direction and takes them to a higher level of understanding and usage. This session covers topics such as: What is gamification? Is it suitable for my organization? What motivates people? From "Maslow's Need" to "Pink's Drive", you'll understand the basic concepts of motivation that gamification uses. we'll also show a demo on gamification for IBM Connections and the metrics used to measure and stimulate desired behavior.

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  • What I do is help organizations and users embedding the software in their organization so that work processes will be more efficient, resistance to the change will be managed and planning and communication of the change is managed.Which helps employees to actually adopt the software quicker.The benefit to my clients/customers are a successful implementation and use of new software within the organization, making sure it will enhance their business goals.
  • game elements = toolboxpoints, quests, badges, levels, progression, rewards, social graph, leaderboardgame techniques (mechanics) there is more to games than elements! = Think like a game designerlistening to what games can teach uslearning from game design, and psychology, management, marketing, ewconomicsappreciating funnon-game contextSome objective other than success in the game
  • UKTotal population: 42,7 millionActive internet poulation 10-65: 50,1 million+9% year-on-yeargrowthTotal hoursspent per day: 55 million +19% year-on-yeargrowth
  • USstrong growth in Social (+37%) and Mobile gaming (+37%) Read more at http://www.newzoo.com/press-releases/total-us-games-market-in-2011-21-6bn/#i6wzl8AXRhJAypeA.99 Total population: 313 millionActive internet poulation 10-65: 233 millionActive gamers: 157 million, +8% year-on-yeargrowthTotal hoursspent per day: 271 million +26% year-on-yeargrowthThe averageage of a gamer is 30 (in 2011 this was 37, and is graduallydowngrading)there are more female gamers over age 18 (30% of those surveyed) than there are male gamers under the age of 17 (18% of respondents).Casual andsocial games:87% of gamersaged 10-65 play games on online casual websites or socialnetworks (126 million)Online casual and social gaming takes 39% of all 215 million hours spent on gaming each day44% female / 56% male in online casual andsocial games53%aged 21-35, 16% aged 36-50
  • Thisphoto was made by Phil Toledano. He wantedtocapture the emotions of gamers. For a non-gamer: some nuances mightbe lost. Theyusuallyseesomeurgency, and a tad of anxietyandalso the deepconcentrationthatmakesyouthink he is solving a hugeproblem. For gamers: youmightrecognize the twist around the eyesandmouthwhich is a sign of optimism. The eyebrows are up, which is a sign of surprise. This person is on the verse of an ‘’epic win’’.An epic win is a resultthat is soexceptionallypositiveyoudidn’tknowit was possibleuntilyoureach it. Andwhenyoureachit, you’resurprisedit was possible.
  • peopledon’tread the manualtraining is expensive (time&money)time spent on games or gamifiedactivities: 10.000 hoursuntil 21, which is equalto time spent on primaryeducation.10.000 hrs is a remarkablenumber:‘’Outliers’’ byMalcomGladwell. The 10.000 hrs succes theory. Cognitivescientific research statesthatif we study hard for 10.000 hrs we becomevirtuosos. So we have a whole new generation of virtuosos!If we couldonlyengageour employees to put in as manyhourstolearnsocialcollaboration software such as IBM Connections!
  • Adoption is aboutchanging employees’behaviour. The new software allowsthemto do theirwork in a new way. Adoption can help themtransitionfrom the way they do theirworkinto a new way of working.
  • So, the purpose of gamification is toencouragepeopletoadopt, or toinfluence the usage of software.This is why e-office has always put focus on adoption of new software.In our approach we look at software implementationfrom 3 perspectives:  Human– What does thismeanfor employees ? How willit help them in theirdailywork? How willtheylearn features andhowcan we help themwith change?Organization– What is the goal for the organization of the new software? How does thisaddto the vision / mission of the organization?Technology – Whattechnologywillbeused? How willitbeapplied? What are the conditions?20th centurystructures of company processes, culture andstructure (blue) are not well-suitedto support ad-hoc, veryinteractive, alwayson-lineandvery virtual, collaborationandknowledge-sharing.Blue systems are proces-oriented, one must complete pre-defined steps. Steps are clearandeasilylearned.The 21st centuryorganisation must support ad-hoc, veryinteractive, alwayson-lineandvery virtual, collaborationandknowledge-sharing. We call thisYellow. Connections is the social software tool thatcanprovide the technological support. But employees andorganisations are not ready yettofullyadoptthis new way of socialcollaboration. New and different processesneedtobedefined, with the associatedbehaviorneeded.
  • The purposeand benefit of an adoption approach is to help employees andorganzationsunderstandandengage in both the socialcollaborationand the more process-drivencollaboration. Gamification can point employees into the right directiontoenhanceefficencyandeffectivenessthroughsocialcollaboration.Theyoftenfindthemselveswonderinghowto start, feel overwhelmed or don’tsee the benefit of a new way of working. What steps shouldbe taken to share knowledge? Gamification can point in the right direction, step-by-step.Bekende geluiden bij adoptie Connections:Ik weet niet waarover ik moet schrijvenIk heb daar geen tijd voor
  • Whyandhowcan game dynamicsstimulate change in actions/behaviour?3 factors for human behavioral change:MotivationAbilityTriggerThe FBM assertsthatfor a person toperform a target behavior, he or she must (1) besufficientlymotivated, (2) have the abilitytoperform the behavior, and (3) betriggeredtoperform the behavior. These three factors must occur at the same moment, else the behaviorwillnot happen.These twoaxesdefine a plane. In the upper right hand corner is a star thatrepresents the target behavior. The placement of this star is symbolic, meanttosuggestthat high motivationand high ability are typicallynecessaryfor a target behaviortooccur. Toemphasizethisrelationshipbetweenmotivation, abilityand target behavior, Figure 1 also has anarrowthatextendsdiagonallyacross the plane, from the bottomleft corner to the upper right. Thisarrow, as the words on the figure say, indicatesthat as a person has increasedmotivationandincreasedability, the more likelyit is that he or shewillperform the target behavior.The third factor in the FBM is a trigger. Without anappropriate trigger, behaviorwillnotoccur even ifbothmotivationandability are high.Whenall 3 factors are present AT THE SAME TIME, human behaviourcanbestimulatedto do certain actions. motivationability (time, attention, mentalcapacity, resources)trigger (timing, suggestion at the right moment)Toreach the desiredbehaviour, users needto have a minimum level of abilityandmotivation. This minimum is the activationthresholdfor the behaviour.
  • Whycan we make anelephant do what we want, even thoughit'sstrongerthanus?Provide a clearpath...Gamification worksby making technology more engaging, byencouraging users toengage in desiredbehaviors, byshowing a pathtomasteryandautonomy, andbytaking advantage of humans' psychologicalpredispositiontoengage in gamingandrespondtorewards.
  • A way of training animals by reinforcing the behaviours you like, so they’ll happen again.The "clicker" is a small noisemaker that makes a distinctive "click" sound when the metal tab is pressed. The clicker is intended to tell your dog when he or she does something correctly. Once you've trained your dog to associate the clicker with rewards, he or she will quickly learn that when she performs a behavior and you click, (s)he will receive a reward. This means that your dog will be an active participant in the training process, instead of just being forced into position.
  • Adoption is aboutchanging employees’behaviour. The new software allowsthemto do theirwork in a new way. Adoption can help themtransitionfrom the way they do theirworkinto a new way of working.
  • With gamification elementssuch as points, badges, missions, leaderboards, ratings – andofcoursefun – employees are motivatedtoworktowards a common goal with a desiredoutcome. Whiletheyworktheyreceivevisiblerewards, appreciation of theirpeersand managers, a sense thatthey matter, andbeing part of a bigger picture, andotherpsycho-socialrewardsthatcan lead to the apex of Maslow’shierarchy.
  • Gamification is abouttaking the things in games thatmotivateus, such as goals, competition, milestones, achievablechallengesandrewards, toencourageustobeproductiveandengage in one or more desiredbehaviors.With gamification mechanismssuch as points, badges, missions, leaderboards, ratings – andofcoursefun – employees are motivatedtoworktowards a common goal with a desiredoutcome. Whiletheyworktheyreceivevisiblerewards, appreciation of theirpeersand managers, a sense thatthey matter, andbeing part of a bigger picture, andotherpsycho-socialrewardsthatcan lead to the apex of Maslow’shierarchy.Game techniquescanencouragepeopletoperformchoresthattheyordinarilyconsider boring, such as completingsurveys, shopping, filling out tax forms, or reading web sites. Available data fromgamified websites, applications, andprocessesindicatepotentialimprovements in areaslike user engagement, ROI, data quality, timeliness, or learning.
  • driving engagement with game design techniques, byproviding:Rapid or even instant feedback — Traditional businesses feedback cycles are muchlonger - monthly, quarterly or even annual, whichmayresult in employees losing focus on their goals.Clear goals andrules — In all but the simplest environments, there are lots of “greyareas” whendetermininghowtoachieve goals or whatshouldbedone, whichcanbe frustrating.A compellingnarrative — Participants in a game receive incentives toachievetheir goal in additiontotheirinternalmotivation.Tasksthat are challenging but achievable
  • change is a process, notan eventdoesn’t happen in an instant. there is a processtobeworkedthroughchange takes timepeople have to re-wire the way theywork, and re-factor the habitsthey have internalizedabouthowwork is donechange is socialthe right peoplecan have a large impact on the introduction of change. Early opinion leaders who model the desired change, and win earlyconverts, canfundamentallyrewire the way groupsandcommunitiesworktogether.change is made real bywhatpeople doChange starts as anidea (future state) andbecomesincreasingly real through a process of discussion, exploration, experimentation, learningandmid-course corrections.
  • What games do very well is encourage hard work. Kudos Badges providesstep-by-stepguidanceandstimulationforsomeonetobecome more involvedandactivelyparticipate in the platform. One of the keyconcepts in games, andtherefore gamification is having the right challengewhichcanbeattainedbyworking hard. Bytaking small steps, startingwithfilling out your profile andexpandingyournetwork, itcan help employees overcomecoldfeet. Or preventan employee frombeingoverwhelmedby the wide range of possibilities in Connections. Gamification shows what small steps youmay take at any time. Anditalso shows what the value of these steps is: of both the work in Connectionsitself as in measurable points. Gamification givesyou the visualrewardwhenyou have finished the actions required (youreceive a Badge, you get a notification in yournewsfeed, it shows yourposition in the Leaderboard).A user is constantly taken to a higher level, to continue, to do more. There is no failure. Youcanalwaystryto get the points again. Failure is thereforejustan incentive towork even harder!
  • Case study on the user adoption of salesforceThe threat of punishment is the highestmotivatorfor short-term change, followedby the promise of financial reward, but bothdeliveronly short-term gains.For long-term change, increasedutility is the highestmotivator.Taken from Michael sampson – User Adoption Strategies 2nd edition.What games do very well is encourage hard work. Gamification providesstep-by-stepguidanceandstimulationforsomeonetobecome more involvedandactivelyparticipate in the platform. One of the keyconcepts in games, andtherefore gamification is having the right challengewhichcanbeattainedbyworking hard. Bytaking small steps, startingwithfilling out your profile andexpandingyournetwork, itcan help employees overcomecoldfeet. Or preventan employee frombeingoverwhelmedby the wide range of possibilities in Connections. Gamification shows what small steps youmay take at any time. Anditalso shows what the value of these steps is: of both the work in Connectionsitself as in measurable points. Gamification givesyou the visualrewardwhenyou have finished the actions required (youreceive a Badge, you get a notification in yournewsfeed, it shows yourposition in the Leaderboard).A user is constantly taken to a higher level, to continue, to do more. There is no failure. Youcanalwaystryto get the points again. Failure is thereforejustan incentive towork even harder!
  • Is gamification a long term strategy?points en badges are extrinsicrewards.extrinsic incentives willultimatelydecrease a person’sintrinsicmotivationfor the gamifiedbehavior (a phenomenonknown as overjustification). Hoewel niet een gamification strategie duurzaam is, werkt het op de korte termijn. In feite werkt het zeer goed in een korte tijd (bijvoorbeeld bij adoptie).Hoe kun je de strategie zo lang mogelijk effectief laten zijn?bij het doen van de activiteit door de medewerker, creëert hij iets dat langdurig waarde heeft. Wanneer de speler deze waarden begint te beseffen, zal de extrinsieke beloning minder belangrijk worden. Het hele beloningssysteem wordt secundair en dient ter versterking van de waarde die de medewerker creëert, die vervolgens de belangrijkste motivator wordt.Vervolgens zal de op de lange termijn gecreëerde waarde (samen met de secundaire extrinsieke beloning) weer de gamified activiteit versterken. Hierdoor ontstaat een positieve feedback loop die uiteindelijk de gamified activiteit verandert in iets dat intrinsiek motiverend werkt.Bron: Michael Whu, Pd. D. http://lithosphere.lithium.com/t5/Building-Community-the-Platform/The-Gamification-Backlash-Two-Long-Term-Business-Strategies/ba-p/30891One of the biggestmistakesthatpeople make whendesigning engagement with gamification is toassumethat cash (or stuff) is the ultimate reward. Time and time again, evidence shows thattangiblerewards have serious deficits in an incentive scheme.Sowhat is the right reward schema? I have a simple approach thatI’ve been usingwith partners that – in most cases – willproduce the optimalresults. The mnemonic is easy toremember: SAPS.StatusAccessPowerStuff
  • Byapplying a system of incentives individualsandgroups are guidedtowrds a specific set of desiredbehavior, which in turn willinfluence a positiveoutcome (desiredresults /set goals).When gamification is appliedproperlyitbecomesan engagement mechanismforcollaborationbehaviorwhichovercomes the naturalincapacity of peopleandorganizationstoeffectivelycollaboratetowards a common goal.
  • Byapplying a system of incentives individualsandgroups are guidedtowrds a specific set of desiredbehavior, which in turn willinfluence a positiveoutcome (desiredresults /set goals).When gamification is appliedproperlyitbecomesan engagement mechanismforcollaborationbehaviorwhichovercomes the naturalincapacity of peopleandorganizationstoeffectivelycollaboratetowards a common goal.
  • Gamification partner
  • Gamification partnerHosted + cloud + on premise environmentCustomize levels andmissionsIntegration withother toolsFocused on training, first steps and long-term
  • Sharing ‘WOW moments’Focused on peer recognitionCustomawards, badges andachievements
  • http://www.bunchball.com/blog/post/813/gaming-the-systemGAMING THE SYSTEMByMollyKittle, Vice President, Digital Strategy, Bunchball molly.kittle@bunchball.com / @MolKittleIt exists in every aspect of our society: sports, gambling, personal relationships, video games, board games,education/academia, the healthcare system, taxes, dieting, politics, environmentalregulation, online communities,driving…  It seemsthatwhereverthere's a system designedtorewardpeopleforsuccess/goodbehavior, peoplewilltrytofind a way tomanipulateitfor personal gain.The spectrum of language we usetodescribevarious types of ‘cheating’ shows ourcollectivemoralambiguity on the subject.  Breaking the speed limit is against the law, but we'reallguilty of tryingto get toourdestinationfasterthan the law permits.  Cheatingmaybeexcusablewhenitcomestoourdiet, but not whenitcomestoourspouse.  Ifyoualready have tickets toan event, itmightbe ok tojump in line with a friend, but cuttingto the front of a line that is givingaway a finitenumber of entries means thatsomeoneelsewhowaited in line won't get in - sothat's not ok.  Whetherwe'rebending the rules, taking a short-cut, creatingourown solution, finding a loop-hole... the themehereseemstobethatwhen the impact of our actions is selfcontained, there'sthismoralwiggle-room and we can 'get awaywithit' but as soon as our actions have a negative impact on others, we'vegonetoo far.  As opposedto the previous real-worldexamples, in the context of gamification, someconsiderattempts at gaming a system tobe (dare I say) a positive indicator of extremely high engagement.  Afterall, it is a signthatpeople have a high level of affinitywithanexperienceand are willingto go togreatlengthstocome out on top.  This, of course, ignores the moralimplications of cheatingand the erosion of trust thatsuccessfulcheatingcreates.  The key is to make sure the experienceanticipates the ways in whichpeople are likelytotrytobend the rulesand put measures in placetopreventthoseattemptsfromimpactingotherpeople'sexperience.  Rules make a game fair.  Enforcement of thoserulesprovides comfort andmakesitworthplaying. Violation of ruleserodes the validity of the system you'vecreated - andoncepeoplecan't trust that a game is fair, theydon't want toplay.It's a concern I hearoften:  "Whatifpeopletryto game the system?"  It's my job to help peopleunderstandthat the question isn't will they, it's howwillthey, andthenfigure out howto take thatrealityintoconsideration as we make a plan.  Becausewhile we can't change the human tendencytofindcreative, morallyquestionablewaystomanipulate systems for personal gain, we canmitigate the impact of their actions on others.  For the remainder of this post - let's take the focus off of how we feel aboutcheatingand put the focus on what we can do about it. Chooserewardsthatresonatewithyourcoreaudience.  Make the rewardsomethingthatpeoplewhodon’t care aboutyour brand won’tbothercheatingfor.  Ifyou're a media company using a contestto rally youraudience, make sure the reward is somethingthatyour fans intrinsicallyvalue (an on-air call-out), ratherthan a rewardthat'sextrinsicallymotivatingto a broadaudience (money).  Ifyou’re a company onboarding new sales reps, put the focus on a rewardthattiesinto corporate culture andcareer – a lunch with the CEO, the opportunity formentorshipwith a respected leader.Put controls in place.  Look at the naturalactivity of youraudience over time.  How often are theynaturallydoing the thingsyou want themto do more of?  Onceyou have that baseline, thenthinkabouthowmuch of anincreaseyou'dliketoseeand set rewardfrequencylimitsaccordingly.Shake things up!  Make sureyou'recreating a system that has a variety of different earningopportunities.  Ratherthanrewardingpeopleforevery video theywatch, rewardthemforwatching a specific video on a certainday.Make themjumpthroughhoops.  Create pre-requisitesthatrequiresomeonetosatisfy a variety of different criteria within a certain timeframe.Focus on whatmatters – value vs. volume.  Rewardforqualityratherthanquantity, e.g. the achievementhappensforthemwhenothersratetheircomment as helpful, notwhentheysubmit the comment.Incorporate surprise anddelight.  Rewardsthat are discoveredratherthanannounced are an important part of the puzzle, so is randomization or jackpot type rewards.  Youcancreate a pattern in delivering these rewardsthatcanbefigured out – creating a feeling of satisfactionforhighlyengagedparticipants – make sureto cap the reward opportunity forthatactivity at a certainthreshold.Let themthinkthey have the upper hand.  Ifyou have a highlyengagedaudience, givethemopportunitiesto feel likethey've taken a shortcut or have received a benefit that no oneelse has.  Youcan do this via messaging and real time feedback, creating a special level or groupfor the top x% (based on non-cheat-able criteria such as a purchaseamount)  - withexclusiverewardsand/or recognition.Askfor help.  Run yourfinal thinking byyourlegaldepartment - theylikely have experienceandperspectivethatcan help.Choose the right tools.  Make sureyou have the abilitytomodifyyourinitial gamification solution, as needed, on anongoing basis, as the behaviorandneeds of your community shifts over time.Do yourdue diligence.  Implement A/B testingtoseewhichtacticsresonate best withyouraudienceandyour goals.In a nutshell:People willtrytofindcreativewaysto win - sosolveforthatrealityAnticipate the ways in whichthey'llbecraftyPut safeguards in placeforthosescenariostoprevent the cheatingfromhaving a negative impact on othersMaintain the integrity of the experienceforeveryone.Ifyou'reinterested in other info aboutwhypeople do whatthey do I alwaysenjoy reading Dan Arielly's blog.
  • BP304 Become a social business: leverage user-adoption through gamification

    1. 1. BP304 Become a Social Business: Leverage User Adoption Through Gamification Sasja Beerendonk | Collaboration consultant @ e-office© 2013 IBM Corporation
    2. 2. Agenda  About me  What motivates us?  What is gamification ?  Maslow – Pink – Fogg  Gamification is everywhere  How does gamification work?  Statistics and research  Measure, reward, enhance – desired behaviour  Gamification and adoption  Game techniques / Behaviour  10.000 hours motivators  NWOW  Roadblocks to change  Yellow&Blue  Extrinsic / Intrinsic behaviour  The path to social collaboration: change  Behaviour loop is social  Gamification for IBM® Connections®2 © 2013 IBM Corporation
    3. 3. About me e-office 1970  sasja.beerendonk@e-office.com history teacher  twitter.com/sbeerendonk collaboration  http://nl.linkedin.com/in/sbeerendonk consultant Rotterdam  http://thoughtsoncollaboration.com social IBM cooking  www.e-office.com adoption cats-and- dogs travel sci-fi spinach3
    4. 4. What do you think of at the word gamification? Gamification is the use of game elements and game design techniques (mechanics) to enhance non-games. Typically gamification applies to non-game applications and processes, in order to encourage people to adopt them, or to influence how they are used. It’s about meaning, not flair to pursue purpose, not leaderboard points Gamification wont solve your business problem it only solves your (short-term) engagement problem4 Source: Wikipedia
    5. 5. Gamification is everywhere In consumer areas
    6. 6. Greener energy Utilities company Nissan Leaf6
    7. 7. And also business-like LinkedIn7
    8. 8. Gartner Research• By 2014, more than 70% of Global 2000 organizations will have at least one gamified application• By 2015, more than 50 percent of organizations that manage innovation processes will gamify those processes8 http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1629214
    9. 9. Statistics and research how many of you are is playing games a gamers? waste of time? what is the average is it a boy thing? age of gamers?9
    10. 10. 2012 gaming research 33,6 million gamers 55.000.000 hours per day women little less hrs men little more hrs 53% men 47% women average age is 3010 Source: Newzoo, National Gaming Research 2012, UK
    11. 11. 2012 gaming research 157 million gamers 271.000.000 hours per day women little less hrs men little more hrs 53% men 47% women average age is 3011 Source: Newzoo, National Gaming Research 20112 US
    12. 12. What do you see? urgency ‘anxiety’ concentration optimism surprise12 Phil Toledano
    13. 13. Time spent gaming training 10,000 hrs! playing games If we could only engage our employees to put in as many hours learning …13 Outliers, Malcom Gladwell, The 10.000 hrs succes theory
    14. 14. How does gamification leverage user-adoption ? The way The way The way we work now we work new we work now ADOPTION14 Source: Michael Sampson User Adoption Strategies 2nd ed. 2012
    15. 15. Make social collaboration possible knowledge | information | everywhere process | control | predictable network | creativity | goal oriented manage | low costs | mechanical smart & flexible structure & process intrinsically | independent | trust 9 to 5 | no errors | internal focus collaborate | discipline | facilitate no change | control | process leading Social collaboration, how do I start?15
    16. 16. Yellow & Blue16
    17. 17. What motivates us ? from Maslow’s Need to Pink’s Drive17 Source: Michael Wu, Ph.D.
    18. 18. Changing behavior - Fogg’s Behavior Model (FBM) trigger high(engaging) target behaviour motivation activation threshold low low high (difficult behaviour) ability 18 Source: Michael Wu, Ph.D.
    19. 19. Encourage to engage in desired behavior19 Source: Vancouver Island Assistance Dogs on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjbGKXESh24
    20. 20. Clicker training – Teaching a chain of actions Small steps  Turning on the light switch Instant feedback  Touch the plate with her nose Positive rewards  Change the position of the plate  Position the plate on the wall  Jump on the chair (so she can reach the switch on the wall)  Put together the chair and the switch  The real switch  Put it all together: jump and switch20 Source: Vancouver Island Assistance Dogs on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjbGKXESh24
    21. 21. How does gamification leverage user-adoption ? The way The way The way we work now we work new we work now ADOPTION21 Source: Michael Sampson User Adoption Strategies 2nd ed. 2012
    22. 22. How does gamification work ? measure Set goals, levels, points and measure if they are met. reward Give feedback, give badges, show the best. enhance Indicate what needs to be done to go further, invite to use advanced functionality or show desired behaviour.22
    23. 23. Encourage users to engage in desired behavior game mechanics behaviour motivators points reward levels status badges achievement leaderboards competition challenges self-expression feedback altruism23
    24. 24. Drive engagement with game design techniques rapid/instant feedback clear goals and rules tasks that are challenging a compelling narrative but achievable24
    25. 25. Some roadblocks to change Fear of the unknown Comfort with the status quo Pushback on being forced to change Change is social ! No sense of the future possible benefit Being overwhelmed with possibilities Change is a process not an event Change takes time Change is made real by what people do25 Source: Michael Sampson User Adoption Strategies 2nd ed. 2012
    26. 26. How then? Profile progress – Photo – About me – Tags – Network – Tag others – Status updates26
    27. 27. 27
    28. 28. 28
    29. 29. expert advanced beginner29
    30. 30. Sticks and carrots: path to sustained adoption increased utility u s a g e financial rewards / carrots punishment / sticks time30 Source: John McGuigan, Fiberlink Communications
    31. 31. About motivation and rewards extrinsic rewards intrinsic rewards competetive: • being good at your job helping, giving, welcoming, • gather knowledge exchange, participate • autonomy • belonging • having fun explorative: • doing work that matters look at, search, collect, complement Source: Michael Whu, Pd. D., http://lithosphere.lithium.com/t5/Building-Community-the-Platform/The-Gamification-Backlash-Two-Long-Term-31 Business-Strategies/ba-p/30891
    32. 32. Behaviour loop desire incentive challenge achievement / reward social feedback mastery32
    33. 33. Is gamification a long-term approach? gamification extrinsic rewards intrinsic/long term33
    34. 34. Gamification in social software Badgeville for Yammer + Jive + IBM Connections ® Bunchball Level Up for IBM Connections ® ISW Kudos Badges for IBM Connections ® TemboSocial The Hive for IBM Connections ®34
    35. 35. 35
    36. 36. 36
    37. 37. 37
    38. 38. IBM partner On-premise environment Focused on first steps and long-term Integration with other tools Customize Badges, Ranks38
    39. 39. Q&A Questions ?  Need more? Get the whitepaper – ‘Measure, reward, enhance’ Contact me (NL or EN)  sasja.beerendonk@e-office.com – ‘Social Business’ (NL)  twitter.com/sbeerendonk  http://nl.linkedin.com/in/sbeerendonk  http://thoughtsoncollaboration.com  www.e-office.com Go see Jane McGonigal, author of Reality is Broken Wednesday 8:15 – Attend my webinar on february 13th AM Keynote 2013 http://bit.ly/Zw3Ylz40
    40. 40. Legal disclaimer © IBM Corporation 2013. All Rights Reserved. The information contained in this publication is provided for informational purposes only. While efforts were made to verify the completeness and accuracy of the information contained in this publication, it is provided AS IS without warranty of any kind, express or implied. In addition, this information is based on IBM’s current product plans and strategy, which are subject to change by IBM without notice. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this publication or any other materials. Nothing contained in this publication is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM or its suppliers or licensors, or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software. References in this presentation to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that they will be available in all countries in which IBM operates. Product release dates and/or capabilities referenced in this presentation may change at any time at IBM’s sole discretion based on market opportunities or other factors, and are not intended to be a commitment to future product or feature availability in any way. Nothing contained in these materials is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, stating or implying that any activities undertaken by you will result in any specific sales, revenue growth or other results.41 © 2013 IBM Corporation

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