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Curriculum & technology symbiosis

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Proposed structure for inclusion of new learning models in a curricular framework.

Proposed structure for inclusion of new learning models in a curricular framework.

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    Curriculum & technology symbiosis Curriculum & technology symbiosis Presentation Transcript

    • Curriculum &Technology SymbiosisMOOCs, edupunks, and virtual badges
    • DirectionsAs you experience this presentation, click on thehyperlinked videos to watch the explanations ofMOOCs and virtual badgesThink about how technology-leveraged curricularstructures may be a disruptive force in highereducationReview the application and experimentation plan forTri-C, and reflect on whether you think any part ofthis might work in your institution.
    • Directions ContinuedThen… discuss:How do you think these new models of technology-leveraged education will impact higher education?Consider the following:Do you think the “average” college student will be impactedby these influences?Do you think the “nontraditional” college student will beimpacted?Do you think institutions of higher education will be forcedto adapt and change as a result of these disruptive models?Is this kind of learning more or less real-world?Is this kind of learning more or less valuable than atraditional college education?
    • MOOCsScaling Disruptive Innovation
    • What are MOOCs?MassiveOpenOnlineCourse
    • Historical Perspective…from 2010
    • Historical Perspective…from 2010
    • Historical Perspective…from 2010
    • Historical Perspective…from 2010
    • Wikipedia’s historicalperspectivefrom http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massive_open_online_course, retrieved March22, 2013.
    • Disruptive Innovationand the MOOC Model“While the hype about MOOCs presaging arevolution in higher education has focused on theirscale, the real revolution is that universities withscarcity at the heart of their business models areembracing openness” (Daniel, 2012, p. 1).“The competition inherent in the gadarene rush tooffer MOOCs will create a sea change by obligingparticipating institutions to revisit their missions andfocus on teaching quality and students as neverbefore. It could also create a welcome deflationarytrend in the costs of higher education” (Daniel, 2012,p. 1).
    • MOOCs and EducationEvolving ModelFirst documented course thatwas massive was in 2008(2,300 students)2012 “The Year of the MOOC”saw an explosion in MOOC-related offerings fromproviders:CourseraEdXUdacityCourseSitescMOOCConstructivist/ConnectivistxMOOCTraditional (aka “Broadcast”)tMOOCTask-Oriented
    • Why MOOCs?Ability to impact many students at one timeAbility to build quality courses with high qualitycontent that can be scaledAbility to leverage talented instructorsIncreases access to higher education while preparingstudents for completion by setting them up forsuccess
    • Open Teaching, MOOCs“The open teaching model has also been applied tostructured learning experiences that did not begin asuniversity courses. These tend to be gathered under themoniker “Massive Open Online Course,” or MOOC. Anexample of a MOOC is Welcome to Change: Education,Learning, and Technology (http://change.mooc.ca).MOOCs are typically based on a “connectivist” philosophythat eschews educator-specified learning goals andsupports each per- son in learning something different.One way of understanding the MOOC design is to say thatit applies the “open” ethos to course outcomes. In otherwords, students are empowered to learn what theyneed/want to learn, and the journey of learning is oftenmore important than any predefined learning outcomes”(Wiley & Green, 2012, p. 88).
    • Participation in MOOCsPARTICIPANTSActive contributorsEngage in discussions &AssignmentsCreate collaborative workproductActively participate as astudentCONSUMERSPrimarily consumption-based behaviorFinding and using resourcesObserving and readingwhat others are doing
    • Limitations of MOOC ModelFacilitationThe small number of facilitators . . .available to supportlearners in the MOOCs raised concerns about theirlevel of interaction, participation, and engagement(Kop, Fournier & Sui, 2011, p. 86).Lack of coherent structure (cMOOC)“The lack of a coherent and centralized structure and alack of summary around learning in the MOOCs alsopresented challenges for some participants, inparticular the novice learners” (Kop, Fournier & Sui,2011, p. 86).Retention and success ratesMuch smaller than traditional online classes
    • The Future of MOOCsDisruptive innovation seeking sustainability
    • Potential Implications of MOOC-Related Learning ModelsTrending to exit-based funding insteadof entrance-basedStudents pay for the college credit after theysuccessfully complete a classStudents pay to take a proctored exam at a college oruniversity which entitles them to some sort of credit(for fee)Students pay for a low-cost certificate-based proof oftheir learning (EX: Open Courseware and OpenStudy =$30)
    • Potential Implications of MOOC-Related Learning ModelsBlended models –MOOCs in conjunctionwith face-to-facelearning, studygroups, facilitation,etc.Hyflex models withblended face-to-faceand onlineexperiences withdifferent groups ofstudents for differenttypes of credit
    • Potential Business ModelsData mining: Sell student information to potential employers oradvertisers.Cross- or up-sell: Course materials (e.g., videos) are freely available,but ancillary services like assignment grading, access to the socialnetworks, and discussions are fee-based.Advertising model: Courses have named sponsors.Tuition model: Students pay the originating institution for coursecredit.Spin off/licensing model: Sell the course, parts of the course, orcustomized versions of the course to institutions or businesses fortheir internal use; license institutional use of the MOOC platformitself.From What Campus Leaders Need to Know About MOOCs:http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/PUB4005.pdf
    • Other Potential ModelsUse as an outreach tool to increase enrollment forinstitutionsIncreased creation & use of adaptive learning modelswithin (and without of MOOCs)Push the dial on institutions granting credit for non-institution-originating learning experiences (see DIY U)New, yet-to-be-determined experimental models
    • Current Providersfrom http://publications.cetis.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/MOOCs-and-Open-Education.pdf , retrieved March 22, 2013.
    • In the news… March 14,2013“The bill. . . would force all the state’s colleges – fromcommunity colleges to the University of California atBerkeley – to reduce overcrowding by allowing studentsto enroll in dozens of outsourced classes. The ideaimmediately captured attention not just among educators,but among pundits and politicians -- and not just inCalifornia”from Inside Higher Ed re: Californias SB 520http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/03/14/california-educational-factions-eye-plan-offer-mooc-credit-public-colleges#ixzz2OD2DtDZx
    • EdupunksDo-It-Yourself Credentials Infringe on Traditional Post-Secondary Education
    • DIYU & Edupunks
    • What is DIYU all about?Kamenetz, A. (2011). The edupunks guide to a DIY credential. Retrievedfrom http://www.scribd.com/doc/60954896/EdupunksGuide
    • Write a PersonalLearning Plan1. Set a goal and choose adeadline.2. List current status of yourlearning with respect tothat goal.3. Determine learning steps:• Type of credential• Content and skills you’llneed• Institutions to involve• Prior learning credits• Specific books, videos &websites to include4. Social experiences topursue as part of yourlearning.5. Who can help with this?6. Concrete next steps foryour plan.
    • Virtual BadgesFor the Scout in All of Us
    • Get a Badge“A “badge” is a symbol or indicator of anaccomplishment, skill, quality, or interest. From theBoy and Girl Scouts to PADI diving instruction, to themore recently popular geolocation game Foursquare,badges have been successfully used to set goals,motivate behaviors, represent achievements, andcommunicate success in many contexts” (Knight &Casilli, 2012, p. 279).
    • What are virtual ordigital badges?
    • Does learning look differentnow?“In today’s world, learning can look very differentfrom how it was traditionally imagined. Learninghas evolved from simple “seat time” withinschools to extend across multiple contexts,experiences, and interactions. It is no longer justan isolated or individual concept, but is insteadinclusive, social, in- formal, participatory, creative,and lifelong” (Knight & Casilli, 2012, p. 279).
    • Employers & Competencies“Our conversations with employers have revealedthat they are looking for a new, more granularevidence-based system to help them better vetemployees and understand their skill sets,particularly their social skills. Our pilot efforts havedemonstrated that badges can motivate learning andbuild reputation within communities. And, thecombination of overwhelming demand and positivefeedback we have received tells us that there isinterest in exploring this initiative further.” (Knight &Casilli, 2012, p. 283).
    • New Type of LearningEcologyAlternative way to earnrecognition for learningCompetency-basedReflective of a new modelof learning:ParticipatorySocialTechnology-leveragedSupported by technologyinfrastructure“The Open Badge Infrastructure(OBI) will provide theunderlying open technologyand standardization to supportbadge issuers and badgedisplayers, while also providinga repository for badgecollection and management foreach learner” (Knight & Casilli,2012, p. 282).
    • New Learning Models forContemporaryCurriculumA Proposed Structure for Cuyahoga Community College
    • New Learning Models for Contemporary CurriculumA Proposal for Application at Tri-CStrategic Focus 1:Access &EngagementMOOCsDIY UBadgesStrategic Focus 2:Quality &InnovationStrategic Focus 3:Completion &Success
    • New Learning Models for Contemporary CurriculumA Proposal for Application at Tri-CStrategic Focus 1:Expand/enhance links withemployers, the workforce system,K-12 and universitiesMOOCsDIY UBadges
    • New Learning Models for Contemporary CurriculumA Proposal for Application at Tri-CStrategic Focus 2:Improve the alignment among allinstructional and training programs tosupport continuous learningMOOCsDIY UBadges
    • New Learning Models for Contemporary CurriculumA Proposal for Application at Tri-CStrategic Focus 3:Develop systems for seamlesstransitions to transfer or jobopportunitiesMOOCsDIY UBadges
    • New Learning Models for Contemporary CurriculumA Proposal for Application at Tri-C• Engage morestudents• Accelerate DevEd ProgressMOOCsDIY UBadges• Competency-based model• Credentialing totransition to jobmarket
    • DirectionsAs you experience this presentation, click on thehyperlinked videos to watch the explanations ofMOOCs and virtual badgesThink about how technology-leveraged curricularstructures may be a disruptive force in highereducationReview the application and experimentation plan forTri-C, and reflect on whether you think any part ofthis might work in your institution.
    • Directions ContinuedThen… discuss:How do you think these new models of technology-leveraged education will impact higher education?Consider the following:Do you think the “average” college student will be impactedby these influences?Do you think the “nontraditional” college student will beimpacted?Do you think institutions of higher education will be forcedto adapt and change as a result of these disruptive models?Is this kind of learning more or less real-world?Is this kind of learning more or less valuable than atraditional college education?
    • ReferencesKamenetz, A. (2010). DIY U: Edupunks, edupreneurs, and the coming transformation of highereducation. White River Junction, Vt: Chelsea Green Pub.Kamenetz, A. (2011). The edupunks guide to a DIY credential. Retrieved fromhttp://www.scribd.com/doc/60954896/EdupunksGuideOblinger, D., & EDUCAUSE (Association). Game changers: Education and information technologies.Washington, D.C.: EDUCAUSE.Jacobi, Ria (Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences); Jelgerheuis, Hester (SURF); van der Woert,N. (Radboud U. N. M. C. (2013). Trend Report : Open Educational Resources 2013. Retrieved fromwww.surf.nl/trendreportOER2013Wiley, D. & Green, C. (2012). Why openness in education? In Game changers: Education andinformation technologies (6). Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/research-publications/books/game-changers-education-and-information-technologies.Knight, E. & Casilli, C. (2012). Mozilla open badges. In Game changers: Education and informationtechnologies (6). Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/research-publications/books/game-changers-education-and-information-technologies.
    • ReferencesFrank, S. (2012). Review: MITxs online circuit and analysis course [Education]. IEEE Spectrum, 49(9),27-28.Kop, R., Fournier, H., & Mak, J. (2011). A Pedagogy of Abundance or a Pedagogy to Support HumanBeings? Participant Support on Massive Open Online Courses. International Review Of Research InOpen And Distance Learning, 12(7), 74-93.Nagel, L., & Kotze, T. G. (2010). Supersizing E-Learning: What a CoI Survey Reveals about TeachingPresence in a Large Online Class. Internet And Higher Education, 13(1-2), 45-51.Steinkuehler, C., & Duncan, S. (2008). Scientific Habits of Mind in Virtual Worlds. Journal Of ScienceEducation & Technology, 17(6), 530-543.Azzawi, M., & Dawson, M. M. (2007). The Effectiveness of Lecture-Integrated, Web- Supported CaseStudies in Large Group Teaching. Bioscience Education E- Journal, 10.Griffin, T., & Rankine, L. (2010). Affordances for Academics: Using Learning Management Systemsto Effectively Manage Large-Enrolment Units in Higher Education. International Journal On E-Learning, 9(4), 505-528.Parscal, T., & Riemer, D. (2010). Assuring Quality in Large-Scale Online Course Development. OnlineJournal Of Distance Learning Administration, 13(2).Schultz, M. (2011). Sustainable Assessment for Large Science Classes: Non-Multiple Choice,Randomised Assignments through a Learning Management System. Journal Of Learning Design,4(3), 50-62.
    • ReferencesDaniel, J. (n.d.). Making Sense of MOOCs: Musings in a Maze of Myth, Paradox andPossibility. Retrieved from Academic Partnerships website:http://www.academicpartnerships.com/research/white-paper-making-sense-of-moocs.Educause’s “7 Things You Should Know About MOOCs”http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7078.pdfNext Step for MOOCs: Helping with Remedial Math in eCampus Newshttp://www.ecampusnews.com/curriculum/next-step-for-moocs-helping-with-remedial-math/What You Need to Know About MOOCs in The Chronicle of Higher Educationhttp://chronicle.com/article/What-You-Need-to-Know-About/133475/Making Sense of MOOCs: Musings in a Maze of Myth, Paradox and Possibilityhttp://blog4222.blogspot.ca/2012/09/making-sense-of-moocs-musings-in-maze.html
    • ReferencesMassive Open Online Courses: Legal and Policy Issues for Research Librarieshttp://www.arl.org/bm~doc/issuebrief-mooc-22oct12.pdfMOOCs: What Role Do They Have in Higher Education? Duke Center for InstructionalTechnologyhttp://cit.duke.edu/blog/2012/09/moocs-what-role-do-they-have-in-higher-education/Sebastian Thrun’s Keynote Address on Democratizing Higher Education at the 2012SLOAN-C Conferencehttp://events.mediasite.com/Mediasite/Play/82b693c44d94441ba4b9c08c75df31351dExplore a New Learning Frontier: MOOCs from Learning Solutions Magazinehttp://www.learningsolutionsmag.com/articles/721/explore-a-new-learning-frontier-moocThe MOOC Guide by Stephen Downeshttps://sites.google.com/site/themoocguide/