The corporate blogging conundrum<br />Training thought leaders to blog vs. giving  bloggers a platform to develop expertis...
About SAS<br />Leader in business analytics software and services, delivering THE POWER TO KNOW®.<br />Unbroken track reco...
Presentation overview:<br />Defining thought leaders vs. natural bloggers<br />Comparing thought leaders vs. natural blogg...
Identifying thought leaders vs. bloggers<br />Thought leader traits<br />Natural Blogger traits<br />Book author<br />Paid...
People you know<br />Seth Godin<br />Chris Brogan <br />
The SAS version<br />Gary Cokins<br />Chris Hemedinger<br />
A blogging program that incorporates both types<br />Level  I – Global program blogs<br />Level  II – Key industry/solutio...
The SAS version continued<br />Gary Cokins: blogs.sas.com/cokins<br />Chris Hemedinger: blogs.sas.com/sasdummy<br />
Tips for training thought leaders to blog<br />Teach RSS.<br />Spoon feed links and ideas.<br />Explain the importance of ...
Things to avoid<br />Don’t over-commit.<br />Don’t do it alone.<br />Don’t be too pushy.<br />Don’t expect too much too so...
Is it worth it? <br />Introduced high-value thinkers to the now dominant channels for sharing ideas.<br />Familiarized PR ...
Additional info<br />Twitter: @sascomeditor<br />Email: alison.bolen@sas.com<br />sascom blog: http://blogs.sas.com/sascom...
Copyright © 2009, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.<br />
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The Corporate Blogging Conundrum

524 views
465 views

Published on

Teaching thought leaders to blog vs. giving natural bloggers a platform to develop and share expertise. How to create a blogging program that draws on skills of thought leaders and natural community builders.

Published in: Technology
2 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Thanks, delta40. Trying to do anything with social media in a large corporation requires lots and lots of patience.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Nice presentation. I especially like the comment on patience.
    Trying to sell back value from conversation is an iffy proposition however you slice it.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
524
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
2
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Chris has said that he spent years blogging without many readers at all before developing an avid following. He’s been active in social meida for more than a decade, and he’s one of the biggest advocates for participating actively with other bloggers: commenting on their blogs, linking to them, engaging on Twitter, etc. He also started these little conferences called podcamps. You may have heard of them.Because of the scale of their popularity, they’ve both transcended the definitions I’ve set up here. Seth is now a popular blogger and Chris is an author and speaker. But at their start in social media, they came to blogging from the two vantage points we’re discussing.
  • The Corporate Blogging Conundrum

    1. 1. The corporate blogging conundrum<br />Training thought leaders to blog vs. giving bloggers a platform to develop expertise<br />Presented by Alison Bolen (@sascomeditor)<br />
    2. 2. About SAS<br />Leader in business analytics software and services, delivering THE POWER TO KNOW®.<br />Unbroken track record of revenue growth every year since 1976 .<br />$2.26 billion worldwide revenue in 2008.<br />22 percent reinvestment in research and development in 2008.<br />More than 11,000 employees, 400 offices globally.<br />
    3. 3. Presentation overview:<br />Defining thought leaders vs. natural bloggers<br />Comparing thought leaders vs. natural bloggers<br />The SAS blogging program<br />How to support thought leaders<br />Is it worth it?<br />
    4. 4. Identifying thought leaders vs. bloggers<br />Thought leader traits<br />Natural Blogger traits<br />Book author<br />Paid speaker<br />Paid to consult <br />Sanctioned by PR<br />Often quoted in the press<br />Corporate photo on file<br />Participates in Forums<br />Loves Twitter<br />Paid by day job<br />Collects content<br />Already blogs <br />Snapshots available<br />
    5. 5. People you know<br />Seth Godin<br />Chris Brogan <br />
    6. 6. The SAS version<br />Gary Cokins<br />Chris Hemedinger<br />
    7. 7. A blogging program that incorporates both types<br />Level I – Global program blogs<br />Level II – Key industry/solution blogs<br />Level III – SAS Sponsorship blogs<br />Level IV – Independent bloggers <br />[Unclassified testing ground – sascom voices]<br />
    8. 8. The SAS version continued<br />Gary Cokins: blogs.sas.com/cokins<br />Chris Hemedinger: blogs.sas.com/sasdummy<br />
    9. 9. Tips for training thought leaders to blog<br />Teach RSS.<br />Spoon feed links and ideas.<br />Explain the importance of brevity.<br />Chat weekly.<br />Idea exchange with other bloggers.<br />Develop official training.<br />Repeat (practice extreme patience).<br />
    10. 10. Things to avoid<br />Don’t over-commit.<br />Don’t do it alone.<br />Don’t be too pushy.<br />Don’t expect too much too soon.<br />
    11. 11. Is it worth it? <br />Introduced high-value thinkers to the now dominant channels for sharing ideas.<br />Familiarized PR with blogging and social media.<br />Tapped into new networks and audiences.<br />Gained acceptance inside the company for blogging and social media.<br />Gained visibility for SAS as a forward-thinking company.<br />
    12. 12. Additional info<br />Twitter: @sascomeditor<br />Email: alison.bolen@sas.com<br />sascom blog: http://blogs.sas.com/sascom<br />SAS blogs: http://blogs.sas.com<br />Web 1.0 www.sas.com/sascom<br />
    13. 13. Copyright © 2009, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.<br />

    ×