Weavingprocess

734 views
731 views

Published on

Published in: Lifestyle, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
734
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
11
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
52
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Weavingprocess

  1. 1. HANDLOOM WEAVING PROCESS: SILK YARN MAKING: Silk is an animal protein fiber produced by certain insects to build their cocoons and webs. Sericulture Cultivation of the silkworm is known as sericulture. Although many insects produce silk, only the  filament produced by Bombyx mori, the mulberry silk moth and a few others in the same genus, is  used by the commercial silk industry.
  2. 2. Hatching the Eggs:    The first stage of silk production is the laying of silkworm eggs, in a controlled environment such  as an aluminum box, which are then examined to ensure they are free from disease. The female  deposits 300 to 400 eggs at a time.    The Feeding Period:    Once hatched, the larvae are placed under a fine layer of gauze and fed huge amounts of chopped  mulberry leaves during which time they shed their skin four times. The larvae may also feed on  Osage orange or lettuce. Larvae fed on mulberry leaves produce the very finest silk. The larva will  eat 50,000 times its initial weight in plant material.
  3. 3. Spinning the Cocoon    The silkworm attaches itself to a compartmented frame, twig, tree or shrub in a rearing house to  spin   a   silk   cocoon   over   a   3   to   8   day   period.   This   period   is   termed   pupating. Reeling the Filament   At this stage, the cocoon is treated with hot air, steam, or boiling water. The silk is then unbound  from the cocoon by softening the sericin and then delicately and carefully unwinding, or 'reeling' the  filaments from 4 ­ 8 cocoons at once, sometimes with a slight twist, to create a single strand.
  4. 4. Rorolling:
  5. 5. Silk Saree Weaving: Coloring:     The process starts with dyeing the silk/cotton material. We have specially dedicated experts for  this process. In short the coloring process includes dipping the material repeatedly in the boiled  color water. We take the utmost care while dyeing the silk/cotton to make sure that the color is  uniform throughout the material and it doesn't affect the quality of the material.
  6. 6. Dying:    After coloring the silk is dried in shade. Drying the material in sunny can harm the material.  Rolling:     After the silk is dried, it is rolled over small sticks (called kandis locally). 
  7. 7.   Weaving:    The design required on the saree is initially drafted on a graph paper and then the required setup to  weave that design is implemented on the handloom machine using the sheet. We have experts for  implementing these innovative designs on borders, body and pallu. All the required setup is made  on the handloom machine by our experts before weaving the saree. 

×