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This presentation describes the process of food irradiation and the packaging materials used for irrradiated food.

This presentation describes the process of food irradiation and the packaging materials used for irrradiated food.

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Food Irradiation_S.K.Saravana Presentation Transcript

  • 1. FOOD IRRADIATION S.K.SARAVANA Post Graduation - Packaging Technology Diploma – Supply Chain Management Six Sigma Green Belt Bsc. (Chemistry)
  • 2. HISTORY OF FOOD PRESERVATION OLD METHODS NEWER METHODS - Drying - Refrigeration - Fermenting - Freezing - Salting - Canning - Smoking - Preservatives Latest Method: IRRADIATION S.K.SARAVANA sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 3. FOOD IRRADIATION• Food Exposed to Controlled Energy (Ionizing Radiation) – Gamma Rays (bulk foods on shipping pallets) – X Rays (deep penetration, requires shield) – Electron Beam Radiation (shallow penetration)• Radiation Kills Microorganisms w/o Raising Food Temperature• Does not and cannot make foods radioactive S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 4. HISTORY OF FOOD IRRADIATION• Approved for potatoes by Canada in 1960• 1963 First FDA approval for insect control in wheat flour• 1964 - Dehydrated vegetable seasoning• 1986 - Fruit and vegetable ripening• 1990 - Fresh and frozen poultry to control salmonella and other pathogens S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 5. HOW IS FOOD IRRADIATED? S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 6. EFFECTS OF FOOD IRRADIATION• Prevent Food Poisoning By Reducing – E. Coli )157:H7 (Beef) – Salmonella (Poultry) – Campylobacter (Poultry) – Parasites• Prevent Spoilage by Destroying Molds, Bacteria and Yeast• Control Insects and Parasite Infestation• Increase Shelf Life by Slowing Ripening of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 7. WHAT ARE THE FOOD IRRADIATOR SOURCES?• Cobalt-60 and Cesium-137 – Emit gamma rays – Sealed in container - never touches food – Can be recycled• Beta or X-rays – Produces no waste outside of the machine used to produce the radiation S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 8. IRRADIATION PROCESSES• Sterilization• Pasteurization• Disinfestation• Sprout Inhibition• Delay of Ripening• Physical Improvements S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 9. IRRADIATION STERILIZATION• Very high dose used to kill all organisms• Sterilization of > 50% disposable medical instruments• Food sterilization – NASA & BARC S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 10. IRRADIATION PASTEURIZATION• Reduces remaining number of living organisms• Prevent growth of mold• Kills bacteria and parasites S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 11. RADIATION DISINFESTATION• Kills insects and parasites in grains and other stored foods• Fewer chemical residues on fruits and vegetables• Does not prevent against re-infestation S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 12. PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS• Inhibit sprouting of potatoes, onions and garlic• Delay of ripening for strawberries, mangoes, bananas, tomatoes, etc.• Improvement in fruit texture and meat color S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 13. IS IRRADIATED FOOD ACCEPTED? S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 14. • Affected by Irradiation label declaration• Tested by consumer surveys, limited market testing and retail sales• Affected by perception that irradiation equals radioactive• 72% of consumers have heard of irradiation but 30% of those think irradiated foods are radioactive (American Survey)• Survey found that education increases acceptance S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 15. IS IRRADIATED FOOD SAFE TO USE?• Food is not radioactive at energies used in irradiation• Below 10 kGy there are no known toxicological, microbiological, or nutritional problems S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 16. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF FOOD IRRADIATION?• Disease causing germs are reduced or eliminated• Nutritional value of the food is preserved• Decreases incidence of food borne illness• Reduced spoilage in global food supply• Increased level of quality assurance S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 17. SYMBOL FOR FOOD IRRADIATION S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 18. IRRADIATION USE BY COUNTRYS.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 19. U.S. FOOD & DRUG ADMINISTRATION APPROVALS FOR IRRADIATED FOODS FOOD APPROVED USE Maximum DoseSpices and dry vegetable Decontaminates and controls insects 30 kGyseasoning and microorganismsDry or dehydrated 10 kGy Controls insects and microorganismsenzyme preparations 1 kGyAll foods Controls insects 1 kGyFresh foods Delays maturation Controls disease-causing 3 kGyPoultry microorganisms 4.5 kGy (fresh), 7Red meat (such as beef, Controls spoilage and disease- kGy (frozen)lamb and pork) causing microorganisms S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.comGy=1 Gray, or 100 rad (radiation absorbed dose)/kilogram. kGy=1000 Grays.
  • 20. PACKING MATERIALS Packaging Materials Max Dose [kGy]Nitrocellulose- 10coated cellophaneGlassine paper 10Wax-coated 10paperboardPolyolefin film 10Kraft paper 0.5Polyethylene 10terephthalate filmPolystyrene film 10Rubber hydrochloride 10filmVinylidene chloride- 10vinyl chloridecopolymer film S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 21. PACKING MATERIALSPackaging Materials Max Dose [kGy]Ethylene-vinyl 30acetate copolymer 60Vegetable parchmentPolyethylene film 60Polyethylene 60terephthalate film 60Nylon 6 [polyamide-6] 60Vinyl chloride-vinylacetate copolymer film S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 22. TRADE ISSUES & IRRADIATION• Lack of Approval or Positive Approval Lists• Different Regulations Among Countries• Misinformation• Cost• Skepticism About the ‘Science’• Need for Better Data on What is Traded S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 23. FOOD IRRADIATION – THE FUTURE• Implementing irradiation in meat and poultry• Processing industries• Develop suitable packaging• Develop methods to detect irradiated foods• Education of public• Additional research S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 24. CONCLUSION• Regulatory Approvals Will Dominate in Near Term• Consumer Acceptance May Be Major Issue in Some Countries• Cost Impacts on International Competitiveness Could Reduce Trade• No Definitive Policy In Many Countries, Especially Africa, Limit Use & Acceptance S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com
  • 25. THANK YOU S.K.Saravana sarvanpackaging@gmail.com