Systems Thinking for LibrariansA State-of-the-Art ContinuingEducation Seminar: for theSpecial Libraries AssociationJune 6,...
Systems Thinking for Librarians n  Sponsored  by the SLA Engineering,     Biomedical & Life Sciences Divisions     and Ae...
Systems Thinking for Librariansn    Lorri Zipperer, Zipperer Project Management      lorri@zpm1.comn    Rebecca Corliss,...
Systems Thinking for Librarians  Our actions create our  reality. "                "                                 Peter...
Systems Thinking Class Objectivesn    Explore core concepts.n    Identify effects on information center interactions wit...
References and Toolsn    Senge, Peter M. The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook:      Strategies and tools for building a learnin...
Systems Thinking for LibrariansLogisticsn  Three section program 8am- noon      ¨  Both   lecture and group / team exerc...
Systems Thinking for LibrariansWill you please …n  Introduce yourselfn  Share one key reason for attending    the class ...
PART ONE 1.1 What is Systems Thinking 1.2 Am I A Systems Thinker? 1.3 Questions & Recap                                Zip...
What is Systems Thinking?n    Interconnectedness      ¨    A set of elements that interact to shape behaviorn    Learni...
Systems Thinking: Proven Valuen    Complex problems that involve helping many      actors see the connectedness of the bi...
Systems Thinking: Basic Conceptsn    Everything is connected to everything elsen    You can never do just one thingn   ...
Five Phases of Systems Thinking1.    Structure the problem2.    Understand causal loops and feedback3.    Model the dynami...
Systems Thinking for Librarians  How Does Systems Thinking Pertain to the   Library Profession?    ¨ Allows information w...
Systems Thinking for LibrariansFacilitates achievement of SLA Competenciesn    Will highlight a few todayn    http://www...
Systems Thinking for LibrariansProfessional Competencies:n    Aligning the information organization with key      stakeho...
Professional Competencies, con t n    Develops and maintains a portfolio of       effective and aligned information servi...
Personal SLA Competencies The special librarian: n  Sees the big picture n  Creates partnerships and alliances n  Emplo...
Barriers to Systems Thinkingn    Resources (financial and people)n    Cultural and value-basedn    Leadershipn    Know...
Systems Thinking for Librarians:Exploring ImpactStories of Engagementn  Lorrin  Rebeccan  SaraClass Section 1.2        ...
Are You a Systems Thinker?A Systems Thinker Perceives …   ¨  The  whole whose elements continually affect       each othe...
Systems Thinking Assessmentn  Complete  in five minutesn  Talley each columnn  Discuss results       There are no incor...
Systems Thinking for LibrariansReadiness Assessment - Continuum   F             O    S   R              N       Goal - Top...
Systems Thinking for Librarians Questions & Recap n  Basic concepts of systems thinking n  Why this class? n  Where are...
PART TWO: 2.1   Setting the Stage 2.2   Why Use Stories? 2.3   Problem Identification & Digging Deeper 2.4   Diagramming S...
A Typical Morning Conversation …Class Section 2.1           Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson                                SLA / ...
Does this Sound Familiar ?  n    Pflom and Meyer, established yet old-        fashioned firm  n    New librarian shut ou...
Value of Stories n  Illustratesa theory n  Allows listeners to empathize more     broadly n  Resonates with listeners  ...
Value of Stories  If you have chosen the right story and you tell that    story in a certain way, then not only do listene...
Identifying the Problemn    Problem Structure Modelingn    Digging Deeper / The Five WhysClass Section 2.3              ...
Problem Structure Modeling The problem is: n    Important n    Chronic n    Limited in scopeClass Section 2.3          ...
Exploring the Problem:The Five Whys n    Why X 5 to get at:       ¨    Who, What, When, Where, Why n    What are you tr...
The Five Whys                    Objective                     Why?         Object                 Subject         Why?   ...
Exercise: Pflom s ProblemAnd the problem is….n  Review the storyn  Identify key processes or issues that    resonate as ...
Pflom Problem: con t n    Individually assess the why s that may       have contributed to the situation n    Collect th...
A Picture is Worth aThousand Words …As a systems thinking tool,    diagrams:n  Illustrate cause and effect    relationshi...
Ways of Seeing Things Diagramming System Behavior n    Feedback n    Causal Diagrams       ¨  Several   sample techniqu...
Importance of Feedback               The practice of systems thinking                starts with understanding a          ...
Computer Diagrammingn    Tool for observing patterns in large, complex situationsn    Epidemiological in naturen    Sof...
Behavior Patterns1. Fixes that Fail   2. Limits to Growth   3. Shifting the Burden  TimeClass Section 2.4                 ...
The Role of Delay: n    Acknowledge delay as a factor in       decision making n    Respect delay as an element to      ...
The Role of Delay: Serving ACME                        n    Key project                        n    High                ...
The Role of Delay:                   ACME                                    requests              Adherence              ...
Visualizing the System:                                                                        Target orReinforcing and Ba...
Core Loops: a Few Examples1. Fixes that Fail                         2. Limits to Growth         B                        ...
Visualizing the System: Stepsin a Process n    Perform the exercise with a group       representing multiple disciplines ...
Steps in a Process, con tn    Identify key variablesn    Don t think of loops as stone tabletsn    Avoid focus on detai...
Pflom Story: Balancing Loop (-)                  +        Cost                         Recovery                           ...
Pflom Story: Reinforcing Loop (+)                       +                                Info gathering                   ...
Archetypes: Seeing Patterns  n    Accidental Adversaries  n    Fixes that Fail  n    Limits to Growth  n    Shifting t...
Archetypes: Why Bother?  n    Test mental models  n    Provide consistent representations of        hypotheses that cont...
Archetypes Exercise             +                                           The problem                                   ...
Fixes that Fail                 +     Cost recovery                         initiated                           The proble...
Archetypes: Making Change n    Visualize, study and implement       change projects n    Identify positive reinforcing l...
Systems Thinking for Librarians Questions & Recap n  Problem definition and the five whys n  Diagramming methods and dia...
PART THREE3.1 Intro and Personal Awareness3.2 Ladders of Inference3.3 Discussion and Dialogue3.4 Wrap Up                  ...
Role of Personal Awareness inSystems Thinking n    Mental Models n    Ladders of Inference n    Discussion and Dialogue...
Mental Modelsn    Are deeply ingrained assumptionsn    Are tacit, not explicitn    Can derail systems thinkingn    Nee...
Ladders of Inference n     A common mental pathway of       increasing abstraction, often leading to       misguided beli...
Ladders of Inference, con t  Ladder rests on:  1) observable data and  2) one s past experience - both are solid.  Rungs m...
Steps Toward Understanding 1st Rung: Select data to focus on 2nd Rung: Add own meaning to data 3rd Rung: Make assumptions ...
Steps Toward Understanding  Next Rung: Draw conclusions - can             be more than one rung  Next Rung: Develop, add t...
Climbing the Ladder: an Exercisen    Start from the bottom of the laddern    Build up – one assumption is usually based ...
Recap: Tool for Awarenessn    MUST      ¨  filter data,      ¨  decide what is important,      ¨  develop belief syste...
Systems Thinking for Librarians Discussion and Dialogue n    Constructive interaction with colleagues       promoted cont...
Goals of Conversing Stylesn    Advocacy      ¨  Marketing leverage      ¨  Arguing for one point of viewn    Discussio...
Setting the Stage for Dialoguen    Seek to catalyze insight and      discover the process of      thought.n    Encourage...
Setting the Stage for Dialoguen    Listen not only to participate but with an      openness to change.n    Be aware of y...
Dialogue at Pflomn  Step into the librarian s shoesn  Structure an opportunity for dialogueClass Section 3.3            ...
Systems Thinking for Librarians  Recap  n    Do you see a way you can apply systems        thinking and tools to your sit...
Systems Thinking for Librarians  Wrap Up  n    Refer back to desired goals from morning  n    Please fill out evaluation...
Continue the Conversationn  Lorri   Zipperer   ¨ lorri@zpm1.comn  Rebecca         Corliss   ¨ rcorliss@schiffhardin.co...
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Sla systems thinking ce presentation 2004

  1. 1. Systems Thinking for LibrariansA State-of-the-Art ContinuingEducation Seminar: for theSpecial Libraries AssociationJune 6, 2004, Nashville TN. Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  2. 2. Systems Thinking for Librarians n  Sponsored by the SLA Engineering, Biomedical & Life Sciences Divisions and Aerospace section of SLA-SNG n  Moderated by: Cynthia Bennington, SLA/ Eng n  Support from EBSCO Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  3. 3. Systems Thinking for Librariansn  Lorri Zipperer, Zipperer Project Management lorri@zpm1.comn  Rebecca Corliss, Schiff Hardin, LLP rcorliss@schiffhardin.comn  Sara Tompson, Packer Engineering, Inc. sarat57@msn.com Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  4. 4. Systems Thinking for Librarians Our actions create our reality. " " Peter Senge 5th Discipline, 1990 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  5. 5. Systems Thinking Class Objectivesn  Explore core concepts.n  Identify effects on information center interactions within an organization.n  Identify affects on librarian s interactions with all levels of the organization, immediate reports and exterior clients.n  Construct how acceptance changes an individual s decision-making.n  Determine how the tools affect librarian s strategic planning thought processes. Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  6. 6. References and Toolsn  Senge, Peter M. The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook: Strategies and tools for building a learning organization. 1994.n  Senge, Peter M. The Fifth Discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization. 1990.n  Select Bibliographyn  Glossary Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  7. 7. Systems Thinking for LibrariansLogisticsn  Three section program 8am- noon ¨  Both lecture and group / team exercisesn  Break 10:00 to 10:30 amn  Wrap up by noon Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  8. 8. Systems Thinking for LibrariansWill you please …n  Introduce yourselfn  Share one key reason for attending the class Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  9. 9. PART ONE 1.1 What is Systems Thinking 1.2 Am I A Systems Thinker? 1.3 Questions & Recap Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  10. 10. What is Systems Thinking?n  Interconnectedness ¨  A set of elements that interact to shape behaviorn  Learning Organizationn  Key movers ¨  Forrester (1961) ¨  Center for Organizational Learning / MIT (1989) ¨  Argyris (Teaching Smart People How to Learn, 1991) ¨  Senge (5th Discipline 1990) Class Section 1.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  11. 11. Systems Thinking: Proven Valuen  Complex problems that involve helping many actors see the connectedness of the big picture and not just their part of it.n  Recurring problems or those that have been made worse by past attempts to fix themn  Issues where action affects (or is affected by) the environment surrounding the issue.n  Problems whose solutions are not obviousClass Section 1.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  12. 12. Systems Thinking: Basic Conceptsn  Everything is connected to everything elsen  You can never do just one thingn  Different people in the same structure will produce similar resultsn  From either/or to both/andn  There is no away to throw things ton  The easiest way out is the fastest way back inn  Profound changes can take place in ways we cannot foretelln  The map is not the territoryn  An answer is a question s way of asking a new questionClass Section 1.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  13. 13. Five Phases of Systems Thinking1.  Structure the problem2.  Understand causal loops and feedback3.  Model the dynamic relationships4.  Use scenarios to plan and model affects of actions taken5.  Implement and share learnings with the organizationClass Section 1.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  14. 14. Systems Thinking for Librarians How Does Systems Thinking Pertain to the Library Profession? ¨ Allows information work to be effective and innovative, not isolated ¨ Situates the Information Center as proactive not reactiveClass Section 1.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  15. 15. Systems Thinking for LibrariansFacilitates achievement of SLA Competenciesn  Will highlight a few todayn  http://www.sla.org/content/learn/comp2003/index.cfmClass Section 1.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  16. 16. Systems Thinking for LibrariansProfessional Competencies:n  Aligning the information organization with key stakeholdersn  Assesses and communicates the value of the information organizationn  Builds a dynamic collection of information resources based on deep understanding of clientsClass Section 1.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  17. 17. Professional Competencies, con t n  Develops and maintains a portfolio of effective and aligned information services. n  Conducts market research to identify concepts for new or enhanced information solutions for these groups.Class Section 1.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  18. 18. Personal SLA Competencies The special librarian: n  Sees the big picture n  Creates partnerships and alliances n  Employs a team approach; recognizes the balance of collaborating, leading and followingClass Section 1.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  19. 19. Barriers to Systems Thinkingn  Resources (financial and people)n  Cultural and value-basedn  Leadershipn  Knowledge (ie identification of the problem)n  Process-orientedn  Time constraintsn  Strategic operation and planningn  ITClass Section 1.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  20. 20. Systems Thinking for Librarians:Exploring ImpactStories of Engagementn  Lorrin  Rebeccan  SaraClass Section 1.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  21. 21. Are You a Systems Thinker?A Systems Thinker Perceives … ¨  The whole whose elements continually affect each other over time and operate toward a common purpose. ¨  The Big Picture ¨  The interrelatedness of forces/nothing exists in a vacuum n  Info Center example ¨  Theinterdependencies means no single right answer Fieldbk, pg 90Class Section 1.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  22. 22. Systems Thinking Assessmentn  Complete in five minutesn  Talley each columnn  Discuss results There are no incorrect responses so be honest with yourselfClass Section 1.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  23. 23. Systems Thinking for LibrariansReadiness Assessment - Continuum F O S R N Goal - Top 2Class Section 1.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  24. 24. Systems Thinking for Librarians Questions & Recap n  Basic concepts of systems thinking n  Why this class? n  Where are we on the journey to systemsness ?Class Section 1.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  25. 25. PART TWO: 2.1 Setting the Stage 2.2 Why Use Stories? 2.3 Problem Identification & Digging Deeper 2.4 Diagramming System Influences 2.5 Questions & Recap Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  26. 26. A Typical Morning Conversation …Class Section 2.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  27. 27. Does this Sound Familiar ? n  Pflom and Meyer, established yet old- fashioned firm n  New librarian shut out n  Info gathering inefficient and unreliable n  Solutions require a new way of thinking ….Class Section 2.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  28. 28. Value of Stories n  Illustratesa theory n  Allows listeners to empathize more broadly n  Resonates with listeners ¨ SLA storytelling modelsClass Section 2.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  29. 29. Value of Stories If you have chosen the right story and you tell that story in a certain way, then not only do listeners understand the story ... but they also begin to imagine a story in their own life ... They begin to draw on their own experiences, their own knowledge, their own understanding, and they start to imagine possibilities for themselves. Making Change Happen: Steve Denning Tells the Story of Storytelling Information Outlook Vol. 5, January 2001Class Section 2.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  30. 30. Identifying the Problemn  Problem Structure Modelingn  Digging Deeper / The Five WhysClass Section 2.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  31. 31. Problem Structure Modeling The problem is: n  Important n  Chronic n  Limited in scopeClass Section 2.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  32. 32. Exploring the Problem:The Five Whys n  Why X 5 to get at: ¨  Who, What, When, Where, Why n  What are you trying to accomplish n  Determine the root cause n  Identify possible solutions n  Limitations of the 5 Whys FieldBk pages 108 - 112Class Section 2.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  33. 33. The Five Whys Objective Why? Object Subject Why? Why? Root Cause Place Time Why? Why? www.burton.co.uk/cit/images/cit02.gifClass Section 2.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  34. 34. Exercise: Pflom s ProblemAnd the problem is….n  Review the storyn  Identify key processes or issues that resonate as problematic and support the ineffective relationshipn  Post for further discussion to crystallize thoughtsClass Section 2.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  35. 35. Pflom Problem: con t n  Individually assess the why s that may have contributed to the situation n  Collect them for discussion to drill down to the root causeClass Section 2.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  36. 36. A Picture is Worth aThousand Words …As a systems thinking tool, diagrams:n  Illustrate cause and effect relationshipsn  Facilitate communicationn  Create the a-ha experienceClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  37. 37. Ways of Seeing Things Diagramming System Behavior n  Feedback n  Causal Diagrams ¨  Several sample techniques ¨  Key terms ¨  Illustrating a Story n  Archetypes ¨  Templates of BehaviorClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  38. 38. Importance of Feedback The practice of systems thinking starts with understanding a simple concept called feedback that shows how actions can reinforce or counteract each other. Peter SengeClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  39. 39. Computer Diagrammingn  Tool for observing patterns in large, complex situationsn  Epidemiological in naturen  Software availablen  Beyond the scope of this class www.imm.ecel.uwa.edu.au/ cmms/project_mngt.htmClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  40. 40. Behavior Patterns1. Fixes that Fail 2. Limits to Growth 3. Shifting the Burden TimeClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  41. 41. The Role of Delay: n  Acknowledge delay as a factor in decision making n  Respect delay as an element to understand success or failure n  Regard delay as a force in determining value of changeClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  42. 42. The Role of Delay: Serving ACME n  Key project n  High demand n  24/7 service n  Guaranteed 4 hour turn aroundClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  43. 43. The Role of Delay: ACME requests Adherence recorded hours/bills submitted ACME Time leaves!Class Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  44. 44. Visualizing the System: Target orReinforcing and Balancing Loops Goal Actual + performance Gap Actual ++ performance Gap Reinforcing Loop Balancing Loop Optional Corrective Optional Growing + Element Action Element Action + +Class Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  45. 45. Core Loops: a Few Examples1. Fixes that Fail 2. Limits to Growth B 3. Shifting Growth Limiting the Burden process processGrowth Process = Reinforces behavior RLimiting Process = Balances activityClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  46. 46. Visualizing the System: Stepsin a Process n  Perform the exercise with a group representing multiple disciplines n  Keep it manageable n  Start with a central element/service Adapted from: Kim D. Guidelines for Drawing Causal Loop Diagrams. Pegagus Communications, 1995Class Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  47. 47. Steps in a Process, con tn  Identify key variablesn  Don t think of loops as stone tabletsn  Avoid focus on detailsn  Air assumptions Adapted from: Kim D. Guidelines for Drawing Causal Loop Diagrams. Pegagus Communications, 1995Class Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  48. 48. Pflom Story: Balancing Loop (-) + Cost Recovery Key Element or Corrective ActionClient Activity Research Quality Leverage Expertise Client Bills Limiting constraints + Librarian isolation Growing Class Section 2.4 Action + Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  49. 49. Pflom Story: Reinforcing Loop (+) + Info gathering • Staff use services more • Info expertise applied more • More team involvement +Revenue Info Staff ++ integration Staff satisfaction Client Bills + Client • More support for Info projects satisfaction • More info resources • Business case for info + Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson staff improved SLA / June 6th / 2004
  50. 50. Archetypes: Seeing Patterns n  Accidental Adversaries n  Fixes that Fail n  Limits to Growth n  Shifting the Burden n  Tragedy of the CommonsClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  51. 51. Archetypes: Why Bother? n  Test mental models n  Provide consistent representations of hypotheses that contribute to complexity n  Explore hypotheses to illustrate organizational behavior in a variety of venues.Class Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  52. 52. Archetypes Exercise + The problem symptom + Archetype: Fixes that Fail + Unintended + Class Section 2.4 consequence Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  53. 53. Fixes that Fail + Cost recovery initiated The problem symptom Client leaves Quality+ Archetype: Fixes that Fail Expertise leveraged Client Bills + Isolation Unintended +Class Section 2.4 consequence Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  54. 54. Archetypes: Making Change n  Visualize, study and implement change projects n  Identify positive reinforcing loops n  Do s and Don ts ¨  Do: run small tests, learn from the experience, explore effectiveness regularly ¨  Don t: stop at the identification process, see loop as etched in stoneClass Section 2.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  55. 55. Systems Thinking for Librarians Questions & Recap n  Problem definition and the five whys n  Diagramming methods and dialogue n  What to do next?Class Section 2.5 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  56. 56. PART THREE3.1 Intro and Personal Awareness3.2 Ladders of Inference3.3 Discussion and Dialogue3.4 Wrap Up Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  57. 57. Role of Personal Awareness inSystems Thinking n  Mental Models n  Ladders of Inference n  Discussion and DialogueClass Section 3.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  58. 58. Mental Modelsn  Are deeply ingrained assumptionsn  Are tacit, not explicitn  Can derail systems thinkingn  Need tools to expose them ¨  Left hand column ¨  Ladders of inferenceClass Section 3.1 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  59. 59. Ladders of Inference n  A common mental pathway of increasing abstraction, often leading to misguided beliefs" Chris Argyris n  AKA Leap(s) of Abstraction Do NOT climb up the wrong ladder! Fieldbk, p. 243Class Section 3.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  60. 60. Ladders of Inference, con t Ladder rests on: 1) observable data and 2) one s past experience - both are solid. Rungs move further away from the concrete.Class Section 3.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  61. 61. Steps Toward Understanding 1st Rung: Select data to focus on 2nd Rung: Add own meaning to data 3rd Rung: Make assumptions re data - can be more than one rungClass Section 3.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  62. 62. Steps Toward Understanding Next Rung: Draw conclusions - can be more than one rung Next Rung: Develop, add to beliefs about world - worldview Top Rung: Take actions based on beliefsClass Section 3.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  63. 63. Climbing the Ladder: an Exercisen  Start from the bottom of the laddern  Build up – one assumption is usually based upon another and the inaccurate belief system grows.n  Brainstorm the corrective behaviorsn  Share tales from the front cases.Class Section 3.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  64. 64. Recap: Tool for Awarenessn  MUST ¨  filter data, ¨  decide what is important, ¨  develop belief system, and ¨  act upon it.n  HOWEVER, one can develop inaccurate/harmful, etc. belief systems and views.n  AWARENESS and PERSONAL MASTERY can keep you from climbing up the wrong ladder! Class Section 3.2 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  65. 65. Systems Thinking for Librarians Discussion and Dialogue n  Constructive interaction with colleagues promoted continued learning n  Librarians can apply reference interview skills to other interactions n  Modes of conversation have different elements and support different goalsClass Section 3.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  66. 66. Goals of Conversing Stylesn  Advocacy ¨  Marketing leverage ¨  Arguing for one point of viewn  Discussion ¨  Team consensus builder ¨  Goal oriented or task-based focusn  Dialogue ¨  Exploration and determining shared meaning ¨  Discovery and insight ¨  Collective inquiry and mindfulnessClass Section 3.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  67. 67. Setting the Stage for Dialoguen  Seek to catalyze insight and discover the process of thought.n  Encourage participants to develop a shared intention.n  Create a safe harbor environment where participants can say what they feel in a constructive manner.Class Section 3.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  68. 68. Setting the Stage for Dialoguen  Listen not only to participate but with an openness to change.n  Be aware of your own thinkingn  Manage conflict effectively and constructivelyn  Abandon the notion of the right answer Fieldbk, 375Class Section 3.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  69. 69. Dialogue at Pflomn  Step into the librarian s shoesn  Structure an opportunity for dialogueClass Section 3.3 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  70. 70. Systems Thinking for Librarians Recap n  Do you see a way you can apply systems thinking and tools to your situation right now? ¨  Stories and Scenarios ¨  5 Whys ¨  Causal Loop Diagrams ¨  ArchetypesClass Section 3.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  71. 71. Systems Thinking for Librarians Wrap Up n  Refer back to desired goals from morning n  Please fill out evaluation form n  Please leave cards if you are willing to give us feedback down the road. n  Presentation available at www.zpm1.com n  THANK YOU!Class Section 3.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004
  72. 72. Continue the Conversationn  Lorri Zipperer ¨ lorri@zpm1.comn  Rebecca Corliss ¨ rcorliss@schiffhardin.comn  Sara Tompson ¨ sarat57@msn.comClass Section 3.4 Zipperer/Corliss/Tompson SLA / June 6th / 2004

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