Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
WGST 303 Day 13 Natives and Immigrants
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

WGST 303 Day 13 Natives and Immigrants

90
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
90
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/21/ponka-we-victors-native-american-kansas-immigration-kris-kobach_n_2924096.html
  • Transcript

    • 1. Dr. Sara Diaz WGST 303: The *isms: Race, Class, and Gender Gonzaga University Which Came First?
    • 2. The House You Lived In • Do some investigating and then critically reflect on how the physical place you called home is connected to larger social institutions and historical events, especially as they relate to race, class, and gender. • How did your family come to live in that house? Did they rent or own? • Who lived there prior to your family? • Who were the original inhabitants of that neighborhood and region? Did you live in a place that was once legally segregated (do a little research)? Who were the people who built your house? • What social institutions supported your family's ability to reside in that place? Did someone in your family history (grandparents, great- grandparents) receive an FHA or VA loan? Did your grandparents, or great- grandparents benefit from the GI bill? • What privileges allowed you to live in that place as opposed to others? OR What oppression relegated you to living in that place as opposed to others? • Who was missing in your community and why? • Treat questions as a place to start thinking about how race, class and gender relate to your childhood home.
    • 3. Nuts and Bolts • Paper due Sunday 3/1 at midnight on blackboard • Your paper should not simply answer the questions asked but weave them together to form a cohesive narrative • Use at least three readings from the first 7 weeks of class. • Make sure to put yourself in conversation with them by engaging with the authors' central arguments and key terms (like meritocracy, American Dream, color blindness, etc). • The paper should be no less than 4 and no more than 6 pages, double-spaced, with typical margins. • Give your paper a creative title.