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WGST 303 Day 18 Reproductive Labor
WGST 303 Day 18 Reproductive Labor
WGST 303 Day 18 Reproductive Labor
WGST 303 Day 18 Reproductive Labor
WGST 303 Day 18 Reproductive Labor
WGST 303 Day 18 Reproductive Labor
WGST 303 Day 18 Reproductive Labor
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WGST 303 Day 18 Reproductive Labor

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  • Women who had been working got new opportunities to learn higher value skills
    Women who had been at home gained confidence that they could do hard “Men’s work”
  • Transcript

    • 1. Dr. Sara Diaz WGST 303: The *isms: Race, Class, and Gender Gonzaga University Reproductive Labor
    • 2. Work & Family • What is the institutional meaning of family in our lives? • At what intersections does family sit? • Housing • Wealth • Education • Desire/Love • Health • Reproduction • Functionalist approach—The function of family is reproduction. • Essentialist • Constructivist approach—The meaning of family varies across culture, class, history, etc. • Contextual • Race • Class • Gender • Sexuality • Ability • Nationality
    • 3. What is Reproductive Labor? • p. 325 note 1
    • 4. Women and Work • Women the world over have worked for millennia. • Until 1865, most black women in the US were in bondage and performed forced labor. • In the US, 19th C working class white women (many immigrants) worked in factory jobs. • In the PNW many Japanese American women worked in farming. • Countless women of many ethnicities and races worked at home caring for their families.
    • 5. Public/Private Spheres • Public/Private Binary – Feminist intervention • Dill: • Nation Building: White women’s role in building the new American republic was to mother the next generation of patriotic citizens within the private/domestic sphere. • White women were protected from patriarchal violence in the public sphere by the “cult of domesticity.” • “Racial-ethnic” women were not seen as having a role in nation building as mothers, but as laborers in the public sphere. Thus, the “cult of domesticity” did not protect them when they were in public.
    • 6. Importance of WWII • WWII manpower shortages • Work outside the home -> new skills and opportunities • Gained camaraderie with other women • eg) black women who had worked in isolation as domestic servants now had an opportunity work within a large community of women. • Unions-had to fight for workplace safety and equal pay issues.
    • 7. Free Write Reflect on your own family formation and its relationship to labor: • Who was responsible for productive (waged) and reproductive (non-waged) labor? • Was the reproductive work distributed to household members in traditionally or non-traditionally gendered ways? • How did your family’s class, race, sexuality impact the division of reproductive labor? • Do the histories Dill outlines have any bearing on your family’s division of labor? How so?

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